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The Fenian Cycle

The Fenian Cycle

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Published by Donnette Davis
The Fenian Cycle - An Irish Tale
The Fenian Cycle - An Irish Tale

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Published by: Donnette Davis on Mar 03, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/29/2013

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The Fenian CycleThe Fenian CycleThe Fenian CycleThe Fenian Cycle
Sources:
O' Grady,Standish,Hahyes,ed., trans.,
Transactions of the Ossianic Society,
(Dublin),III (1855/57),40-211. Ni Sh`eaghda,Nessa,Ed., trans.,,
T`oruigheacht Dhiarmada agus Ghr`ainne 
,Irish Texts Society. XLVIII) (Dublin,1967). Best, Richard I.
Bibliography of Irish Philology 
, I 102-103 (Dublin 1913). Cross, Tom Peete, and Clark HarrisSlover
Ancient Irish Tales,
Barnes and Noble, Inc.,1969
 
The Fenian Cycle www.staidenshomeschool.com
 
 Adapted www.staidenshomeschool.com 2007 please refer creditsNOT FOR RESALE
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 INTRODUCTION  INTRODUCTION  INTRODUCTION  INTRODUCTION  A large selection of the best  A large selection of the best  A large selection of the best  A large selection of the best----loved Irish legends are enjoyed  loved Irish legends are enjoyed  loved Irish legends are enjoyed  loved Irish legends are enjoyed  by children from generation to generation. They have been by children from generation to generation. They have been by children from generation to generation. They have been by children from generation to generation. They have beentold for hundreds of years and are part of Irish history.told for hundreds of years and are part of Irish history.told for hundreds of years and are part of Irish history.told for hundreds of years and are part of Irish history.With stories of great giants, clever warriors. Jealous With stories of great giants, clever warriors. Jealous With stories of great giants, clever warriors. Jealous With stories of great giants, clever warriors. Jealous  queens, leprechauns, fairies and magical and mystic  queens, leprechauns, fairies and magical and mystic  queens, leprechauns, fairies and magical and mystic  queens, leprechauns, fairies and magical and mystical  al  al  al  creatures, there is something for everyone to enjoy. creatures, there is something for everyone to enjoy. creatures, there is something for everyone to enjoy. creatures, there is something for everyone to enjoy. My fascination with Ireland, the Irish people and  My fascination with Ireland, the Irish people and  My fascination with Ireland, the Irish people and  My fascination with Ireland, the Irish people and ---- well  well  well  well  everything Irish has been with me for a lifetime, and so  everything Irish has been with me for a lifetime, and so  everything Irish has been with me for a lifetime, and so  everything Irish has been with me for a lifetime, and so  shall be and has been passed on to my own children, my  shall be and has been passed on to my own children, my  shall be and has been passed on to my own children, my  shall be and has been passed on to my own children, my  son having ‘half’ his roots i  son having ‘half’ his roots i  son having ‘half’ his roots i  son having ‘half’ his roots in Ireland. Ireland is a land of  n Ireland. Ireland is a land of  n Ireland. Ireland is a land of  n Ireland. Ireland is a land of  myth and fantasy and a subject I will ne’er become weary  myth and fantasy and a subject I will ne’er become weary  myth and fantasy and a subject I will ne’er become weary  myth and fantasy and a subject I will ne’er become weary  of. Enjoy this adaptation. For easier uploading, I have of. Enjoy this adaptation. For easier uploading, I have of. Enjoy this adaptation. For easier uploading, I have of. Enjoy this adaptation. For easier uploading, I have excluded pictures. I extend my thanks to all my sources, excluded pictures. I extend my thanks to all my sources, excluded pictures. I extend my thanks to all my sources, excluded pictures. I extend my thanks to all my sources, known and unknown and all those who made possible known and unknown and all those who made possible known and unknown and all those who made possible known and unknown and all those who made possible thethethethe research. research. research. research.DonnetteDonnetteDonnetteDonnette
 
Adapted by D E Davis 2007www.staidenshomeschool.com
NOT FOR RESALE
MAY BE DISTRIBUTED FREELY FOR EDUCATIONAL &RECREATIONAL PURPOSES
 
The Fenian Cycle www.staidenshomeschool.com
 
 Adapted www.staidenshomeschool.com 2007 please refer creditsNOT FOR RESALE
- 3 -
The Fenian CycleThe Fenian CycleThe Fenian CycleThe Fenian Cycle
The Pursuit of Diarmuid an The Pursuit of Diarmuid an The Pursuit of Diarmuid an The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Grainne d Grainne d Grainne d Grainne 
 
 
 Part One Part One Part One Part One---- The Flight The Flight The Flight The Flight 
In this the first part of the famous tale we learn much about the nature of the court of a celtic chief. We can follow Grainne for example from grassy area to the house of the women and into the court. We learn of wattle gates and of the arrangement of the hall. We also explore the central aspect of this tale- the relationship of loyalties- will one be loyal to the promises of love or the promises to one's chief and patron. We also take a look at feats of bravery- perhaps those practiced for entertainment and or training at court- Diarmuid leaping on the tips of his spears for example. As you read this story listen as it demonstrates and describes the nature of Celtic society. This is the latest of the ancient cycles. It is a cumulative effort - a layer cake if you will, of all of the traditions which have crossed the island of Ireland from earliest times.
 
Can you pick out the layers? They are it seems all there at least in part as lenses which color the tale.
 
O
n a certain day when Finn mac Cumaill rose at early morn in Almu, inLeinster, and sat upon the grass-green plain, having neither servant norattendant with him, there followed him two of his people; that is, Oisin theson of Minn, and Diorruing the son of Dobar O' Baoiscne. Oisin Spoke, andwhat he said was:"What is the cause of this early rising of thine, O Finn?" said he."Not without cause have I made this early rising," said Finn'"for I amwithout a wife since Maignes the daughter of Garad Glundub Mac Moirne

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An Irish legend to celebrate St. Patrick's Day.
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