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Environmental risks of the shale gas industry need constant monitoring

Environmental risks of the shale gas industry need constant monitoring

Ratings: (0)|Views: 19 |Likes:
Published by amandaferreire
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/letters/9893190/Environmental-risks-of-the-shale-gas-industry-need-constant-monitoring.html

crown capital eco management environmental risks gas boilers

SIR – Peter Foster argues that in Britain we should all pay attention to the story of shale gas extraction in Pennsylvania, where public fear centres on environmental pollution issues (“Now for the downside of fracking”, Comment, February 20).

I am chairman of a joint working group of The Royal Academy of Engineering and The Royal Society that published a joint review last year of the health, safety and environmental risks associated with hydraulic fracturing. The report concluded that these risks can be managed in Britain, but only if operational best practices are implemented and enforced through strong regulation. The Department of Energy and Climate Change has now accepted all of the review’s recommendations, including making environmental risk assessments mandatory for all shale gas operations.
Environmental risks must be assessed across the life cycle of shale gas operations, including water use and waste disposal, seismicity, and the abandonment of wells after operations have ceased. Local communities must participate in these assessments from the outset.

Your article referred to the widespread concern in America about the environmental impact of fracking, and noted cases of improper operational practices. Poorly constructed wells could lead to instances of contamination. That is why our joint academies’ review also recommended improvements to Britain’s independent regulation of well design and construction to ensure the highest levels of well integrity.

The review also stressed that the current scale of operations in Britain is significantly smaller than those in America. None the less, Britain must monitor how risks would scale up should a shale gas industry grow nationwide. Britain’s regulators must be well co-ordinated and sufficient regulatory capacity be ensured so that environmental risks can continue to be managed effectively.

Prof Robert Mair

Cambridge

SIR – We are concerned about the environmental risks associated with fracking such as water contamination and radioactive radon gas, which is in shale gas, and which could be piped and released into our boilers, heaters and other domestic gas appliances.

The Government is so unclear about this risk it has asked the Health Protection Agency to investigate, and we urge no shale gas development until these health risks are fully considered. Our view is that shale gas, like new nuclear build, is an unwanted distraction which the British and Irish governments should avoid.

Green biogas and geothermal energy is a much better alternative, along with a wide range of renewables, energy efficiency and microgeneration. With shale gas, like new nuclear, there are so many unpleasant side effects that we should not go forward with it now, or in the future.

Councillor Mark Hackett

Chairman, Nuclear Free Local Authorities
Manchester

Credit rating agencies
SIR – Why is every utterance of the credit rating agencies treated as if it had come straight from the Delphic Oracle (“Credit rating cut 'puts pound at risk’, report, February 25)? Furthermore, who, if anybody, rates the rating agencies?

Michael Cox

Gravesend, Kent

SIR – Our politicians debate gay marriage while welfare spending is out of control, our energy policy is a shambles and our “progressive” tax system acts as a disincentive to hard work and enterprise.

The loss of our AAA credit rating should come as no surprise.

Mark W Wilken

Dundee

SIR – George Osborne made the retention of our top credit rating one of the most important aims of his chancellorship.

Now we have lost this rating should not the Chancellor consider his position?

Valerie Crews

Beckenham, Kent

SIR – We seem to be obsessed with growth measured by gross domestic product statistics. As I understand
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/letters/9893190/Environmental-risks-of-the-shale-gas-industry-need-constant-monitoring.html

crown capital eco management environmental risks gas boilers

SIR – Peter Foster argues that in Britain we should all pay attention to the story of shale gas extraction in Pennsylvania, where public fear centres on environmental pollution issues (“Now for the downside of fracking”, Comment, February 20).

I am chairman of a joint working group of The Royal Academy of Engineering and The Royal Society that published a joint review last year of the health, safety and environmental risks associated with hydraulic fracturing. The report concluded that these risks can be managed in Britain, but only if operational best practices are implemented and enforced through strong regulation. The Department of Energy and Climate Change has now accepted all of the review’s recommendations, including making environmental risk assessments mandatory for all shale gas operations.
Environmental risks must be assessed across the life cycle of shale gas operations, including water use and waste disposal, seismicity, and the abandonment of wells after operations have ceased. Local communities must participate in these assessments from the outset.

Your article referred to the widespread concern in America about the environmental impact of fracking, and noted cases of improper operational practices. Poorly constructed wells could lead to instances of contamination. That is why our joint academies’ review also recommended improvements to Britain’s independent regulation of well design and construction to ensure the highest levels of well integrity.

The review also stressed that the current scale of operations in Britain is significantly smaller than those in America. None the less, Britain must monitor how risks would scale up should a shale gas industry grow nationwide. Britain’s regulators must be well co-ordinated and sufficient regulatory capacity be ensured so that environmental risks can continue to be managed effectively.

Prof Robert Mair

Cambridge

SIR – We are concerned about the environmental risks associated with fracking such as water contamination and radioactive radon gas, which is in shale gas, and which could be piped and released into our boilers, heaters and other domestic gas appliances.

The Government is so unclear about this risk it has asked the Health Protection Agency to investigate, and we urge no shale gas development until these health risks are fully considered. Our view is that shale gas, like new nuclear build, is an unwanted distraction which the British and Irish governments should avoid.

Green biogas and geothermal energy is a much better alternative, along with a wide range of renewables, energy efficiency and microgeneration. With shale gas, like new nuclear, there are so many unpleasant side effects that we should not go forward with it now, or in the future.

Councillor Mark Hackett

Chairman, Nuclear Free Local Authorities
Manchester

Credit rating agencies
SIR – Why is every utterance of the credit rating agencies treated as if it had come straight from the Delphic Oracle (“Credit rating cut 'puts pound at risk’, report, February 25)? Furthermore, who, if anybody, rates the rating agencies?

Michael Cox

Gravesend, Kent

SIR – Our politicians debate gay marriage while welfare spending is out of control, our energy policy is a shambles and our “progressive” tax system acts as a disincentive to hard work and enterprise.

The loss of our AAA credit rating should come as no surprise.

Mark W Wilken

Dundee

SIR – George Osborne made the retention of our top credit rating one of the most important aims of his chancellorship.

Now we have lost this rating should not the Chancellor consider his position?

Valerie Crews

Beckenham, Kent

SIR – We seem to be obsessed with growth measured by gross domestic product statistics. As I understand

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Categories:Business/Law
Published by: amandaferreire on Mar 13, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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04/03/2013

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Environmental risks of the shale gasindustry need constant monitoring
- Crown Capital Eco Management
 
Page 2
SIR 
Peter Foster argues that in Britain weshould all pay attention to the story of shale gasextraction in Pennsylvania, where public fearcentres on environmental pollution issues
(“Now 
for the downside of 
fracking”,
Comment,February 20).
 
Page 3
I am chairman of a joint working group of The Royal Academy of Engineering and The Royal Society that published a joint review last year of the health, safety and environmental risks associated withhydraulic fracturing. The report concluded that these risks can bemanaged in Britain, but only if operational best practices areimplemented and enforced through strong regulation. TheDepartment of Energy and Climate Change has now accepted all of the
review’s
recommendations, including making environmentalrisk assessments mandatory for all shale gas operations.Environmental risks must be assessed across the life cycle of shalegas operations, including water use and waste disposal, seismicity,and the abandonment of wells after operations have ceased. Localcommunities must participate in these assessments from the outset.

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