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Table Of Contents

1.1 Introduction
1.2 Types of production
1.3 Manufacturing economics: time and cost estimates
1.4 Safety in manufacturing
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Casting
2.3 Moulding
2.4 Forging
2.5 Continuous extrusion
2.6 Rolling
2.7 Drawing
2.8 Blow moulding
2.9 Hydraulic forming
2.10 Rotational moulding
2.11 Moulding of reinforced materials
3.1 Vacuum forming
3.2 Rubber forming
3.3 Superplastic forming
3.4 Embossing
3.5 Shearing
3.6 Bending
3.7 Drawing
3.8 Practical application
3.9 Press load curves
3.10 Hydraulic presses
3.11 Other presstypes
3.12 Roll bending
3.13 Pipe bending
3.14 Spinning
3.15 Roll forming
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Turning
4.3 Moving tool machining
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Geometric form of engineering components
5.3 Kinematics in machine tools
5.4 Kinematics and machining geometric forms
5.5 Classification of generating systems
6.1 Basic features of a machine tool
6.2 Forces in a machine tool
6.3 Structural elements
6.4 Slides and slideways
6.5 Vibration and chatter
6.6 Machine-tool alignments
6.9 Rolling bearings
7.1 The need for automatic control
7.2 Mechanical control
7.3 Single spindle bar automatic lathe (SS Auto)
7.4 Multi-tooling
7.5 Economics of automatic lathes
7.6 Advantages of numerical control
7.7 Analysis of the functions of a CNC machine tool
7.8 Inputs to the machine control unit '
7.9 Program preparation
7.10 Classification of CNC machine types
7.11 Interpolation for contour generation
7.12 Displacement of machine tool slides
7.13 Manual programming
7.14 CAD/CAM links
7.15 Machine tool probing systems
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Chip formation
8.3 Machinability
8.4 Tool wear
9.1 Units and measurement
9.2 Cutting force analysis
9.3 Merchant's analysiS of metal cutting
10.2 Variables affecting metal-removal rate
10.3 Economic cutting speed
10.5 Cutting fluids
10.6 Other variables influencing the economics of cutting
11.1 Introduction
11.2 Selection of turning tools
11.3 The selection process
11.4 Milling
11.5 Peripheral milling - geometry of chip formation
11.6 Cutting forces and power
11.7 Character of the milled surface
12.1 Introduction
12.2 Sanding and finishing
12.3 Grinding
12.4 Creep feed grinding
12.5 Honing
12.6 Lapping
12.7 Ultrasonic machining
12.8 Barrel finishing (tumbling)
12.9 Grit (sand) blasting
13.1 Introduction to non-traditional machining
13.2 Electro-discharge machining (EDM)
13.3 Laser beam machining (LBM)
13.4 Ultrasonic machining (USM)
13.5 Water jet cutting
14.1 Introduction
14.2 Nomenclature and specification
14.3 Tolerance for ISO metric threads
14.4 Screw-thread gauging
14.5 Measurement of the effective diameter
15.1 Introduction
15.2 Length standards
15.3 Some sources of error in linear measurement
15.4 Angular measurement
15.5 Measurement of small linear displacements
15.6 Measurement of small angular displacements
15.7 Indirect measurement
15.8 Straightness testing
15.9 Roundness
15.10 Measurement of surface texture
15.11 Practical metrology
16.1 Specification and drawing
16.2 Interchangeable manufacture
16.3 Dimensioning
16.4 Tolerances
16.5 Economic aspects of tolerancing
16.6 Limit gauging
16.7 Gauging of tapers
16.8 Gauge making materials
16.9 Component tolerancing and gauge design
16.10 Alternatives to limit gauging
16.11 Multi-gauging based on comparators
16.12 In-process measurement
16.13 Co-ordinate measuring machines
17.1 Variability in manufacturing processes
17.2 Statistical concepts and variability
17.3 Normal curve of distribution
17.4 Causes of variation
17.5 Relationships between bulk and sample parameters
17.6 Control chart for sample average
17.7 Control to a specification
17.8 Control chart for attributes
17.9 Sampling of incoming goods
17.10 Tolerance "build-up" in assemblies
18.1 Introduction
18.2 Presentation
18.3 Reorientation of parts
18.4 Transfer
18.5 Location
18.6 Clamping
18.7 Foolproofing
18.8 Service features
19.1 Introduction
19.2 Automatic assembly
19.3 Factors to consider for automation
19.4 Feasibility study
19.5 Quality
19.6 Feeding and assembly
19.7 Machine layout
19.8 Economic assessment
19.9 Automatic assembly techniques
19.10 Servicing the assembly line
20.1 Introduction
20.2 The power press
20.3 The lathe
20.4 Advanced machining facilities
20.5 Tool changing
20.6 Tool code tagging
20.7 Probing
20.8 The turning centre
20.9 The machining centre
20.10 Assembly operations
20.11 Rapid response manufacturing
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86501571 Principles of Engineering Principles

86501571 Principles of Engineering Principles

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Published by: australianpaolo on Mar 14, 2013
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