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An Info-Hippie's Manifesto

An Info-Hippie's Manifesto

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Published by Andrew
i felt the need to get some ideas out there into the ether about how information behaves in the digital age, how to treat it, and how we should interact with it. It's more or less a response to how angry I get every time I hear about The RIAA, the Movie industry, and the Author's Guild complain about copyright laws and pirates.
i felt the need to get some ideas out there into the ether about how information behaves in the digital age, how to treat it, and how we should interact with it. It's more or less a response to how angry I get every time I hear about The RIAA, the Movie industry, and the Author's Guild complain about copyright laws and pirates.

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Published by: Andrew on Mar 06, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/11/2014

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An Info-Hippie’s Manifesto 1.I.Information wants to be Free•In the new millennium information has come alive. Hyperlinks fire likesynapses across the new global mind, there is no stopping it. Memes spread fasterthen we can keep up. Trends spread across the globe in the blink of an eye. Newsstories seemingly reach everyone simultaneously. The spread of knowledge is thenew reality.•Any information that a person wants is at their fingertips. Intelligencecan no longer be measured by the amount of facts a person has memorized but onlyby patterns they see in that information. Everyone of us has access to the samefacts.•It is an impossibility to secure knowledge forever. The more locks placedon forbidden information, the more tempting it becomes to know. Curiosity is man’sdefining characteristic.II. Trust in the Crowds•A Person is confoundingly stupid. There is no exception. One mind canonly ever really see from one perspective. It is impossible for a man to know whatit is that he doesn't know. Reliant on imperfect sensory data, and a hiddenunconscious that continually eludes understanding, a man is forever shackled byhis own limitations•People are amazingly intelligent. Every person has individualexperiences, dreams, hopes, and skills. Through their collaborative use the sum ofour knowledge is greater then it’s individual parts. There is no problem greatenough, no challenge to difficult that humanity can not find the solution. Withenough resources at our disposal everything becomes trivial. The inevitable drivetowards omniscience is the Net’s reason for being.III. Fear the Mobs•One bad idea, one man to preach it. That’s all it takes to turn a wisecrowd into a raged mob. Book bannings, obscenity trials, censorship, surveillanceacts, genocide. These are the dangers we face. Yet the solution lies in theproblem, for the more members in the crowd, the more voices of dissent. This ishumanity’s immune system. Dissension causes discussion, discussions lead tothought, and thinking prevents mobs. The larger the crowd, the more difficult toform a mob.IV. Digitization is Preservation•Just as men can’t force themselves to forget something, neither can theNet. Once information has been digitized it will last in perpetuity, immortalizedfor everyone to know. It has joined with The Net, there is no erasing it.Information may become difficult to recall, seemingly forgotten, but it isn’t

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