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Claremont COURIER 3.15.13

Claremont COURIER 3.15.13

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Published by Claremont Courier
The Claremont Courier is the community newspaper for Claremont, CA. 3.15.13
The Claremont Courier is the community newspaper for Claremont, CA. 3.15.13

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Published by: Claremont Courier on Mar 15, 2013
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COURIER photos/Steven FelschundneffSolar panels are installed on a new covered parking area at the US Bank branch Tuesday on the corner of Foothill andIndian Hill Boulevards in Claremont. The bank leased the panels from Solar City as a way to offset their energy costsand create green power. Corey Fierro and Robert Franco of Champion Electric manage the installation.
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Friday, March 15, 2013
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claremont-courier.com
LETTINGTHE
sunshine in
 
SPORTS/
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20More news and photo galleriesevery day at:claremont-courier.comPOLICE BLOTTER/
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4OBITUARIES/
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Get lucky with Some Crust
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CHS girlssoftball hasrough startwith 5-0loss to LaHabra/
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Charter school applicant makes second plea/
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Claremontʼs Melanie Lauer warms up before going up tobat on Monday during girls softball action in West Covina.
 
Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013
2
The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. ClaremontBlvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postageis paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about sub-scriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Tele-phone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier
one hundred and fifth year, number 18
1
420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205BClaremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-4761Office hours: Monday-Friday9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Owner
Janis Weinberger
Publisher and Owner
Peter Weinberger
pweinberger@claremont-courier.com
Editor-in-Chief
Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com
Newsroom
City Reporter
Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com
Education Reporter/Obituaries
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Sports Reporter
Chris Oakley
sports@claremont-courier.com
Photo Editor/Staff Photographer
Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com
Reporter At Large
Pat Yarborough
Calendar Editor
Jenelle Renschcalendar@claremont-courier.com
Back Page
Sammy
sammy@claremont-courier.com
Production
Ad Design
Jenelle Rensch
Page Layout
Kathryn Dunn, Jenelle Rensch
Advertising
Advertising Director
Mary Rose
maryrose@claremont-courier.com
Classified Editor
Jessica Gustin
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Administration
Office Manager/ Legal Notices
Vickie Rosenberg
legalads@claremont-courier.com
Billing/Accounting Manager
Dee Proffitt
Distribution/Publications
Tom Smith
tomsmith@claremont-courier.com
Circulation/Subscriptions
subscriptions@claremont-courier.com
Intern
Open
City delays release of documents
Dear Editor:I am writing in response to Mayor LarrySchroeder’s letter to the editor (Friday,March 8) suggesting that the city has beenfully compliant with the intent and spirit of the California Public Records Act (PRA).The California Alliance to Protect Pri-vate Property Rights, a California privateproperty rights organization, respectivelydisagrees with the mayor’s assertion.For one, the city has not provided us allthe documents we requested, includingthose required by law. We know this to betrue because the city has been correspon-ding with other public agencies, and theseagencies have provided us the very samedocuments that the city of Claremont haschosen to withhold from our organizationand the public.Secondly, the city has violated the spiritof the law by employing delay tactics todelay even the simplest requests. Such tac-tics may be legal, but are designed to with-hold public information for the longestperiod possible.Claremont residents share our interestin an open and transparent government.Even if the city can legally withhold somedocuments, there is nothing prohibitingthe city from releasing a simple statementthat explains how they intend to financethe taking of Golden State Water Com-pany's private property by eminent do-main and whether such action will in factlead to lower water rates.We hope the mayor, city council andstaff reconsider their long held belief thatthe public is not entitled to know how thecity intends to use their tax dollars.
Nick Mirman
CAPPPR
Keep the Club trees
Dear Editor:I have lived in The Club for over 15years. The big, mature pine trees that linemy streets are one of the reasons my fam-ily move here. It’s also one of the reasonsthat the people who live here, and so manyothers from outside the neighborhood,drive through, walk their dogs, push theirstrollers, jog and run here, not because thesidewalks and streets are a challenge towalk on or unsafe.The removal of 59 trees now and othersin 4 years is because they are damaging thehardscape, not because they are diseased orat risk to fall. Their removal would drasti-cally change the appearance of our neigh-borhood and reduce the value of my home.The proposed “Tree Replacement Pro-gram” would destroy valuable environ-mental assets that will take generations ormore to replace, and it would also set abad precedent for other neighborhoodsthroughout the city of Claremont that arenow, or soon will be, facing the challengeof maintaining their mature trees.I do not support the views of my HOAand the city staff. I support the current treepolicy!
Laura Grochowski
Claremont
 
READERS’ COMMENTS
 ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
Convivial cave, Loaves, a bottle—what a friend We have in cheeses.
—D. J. Kraemer
Haiku submissions should reflect upon life orevents in Claremont. Please email entries toeditor@claremont-courier.com.
 Agendas for city meetings are avail-able at www.ci.claremont.ca.us
GOVERNINGOURSELVES
Tuesday, March 19
City Council, Special MeetingCouncil Chamber, 5:30 p.m.
Thursday, March 21
CUSD Board of EducationKirkendall Center, 6:30 p.m.
Monday, March 25
Tree CommitteeCouncil Chamber, 6 p.m.
READERS’ COMMENTS
Please send readers’ comments via email toeditor@claremont-courier.com or by mail orhand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste.205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline forsubmission is Tuesday at 5 p.m.The COURIER cannot guarantee publicationof every letter. Letters are the opinion of thewriter, not a reflection of the COURIER. We re-serve the right to edit letters.
 Letters should not exceed 250 words
.
The Claremont City Council will hold aspecial meeting on Tuesday, March 19 toselect the new mayor and mayor pro tem.In contrast to other cities, Claremont haslong-held a tradition of councilmembers se-lecting the mayor, as opposed to it being anelected position. Mayor Larry Schroederwill pass the torch after a year as Clare-mont’s mayor.Also, Mr. Schroeder and Councilmem-ber Corey Calaycay will be sworn back intooffice following their re-election. The cere-mony takes place at 5:30 p.m. in the CityCouncil Chamber, 225. W. Second St.
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claremont-courier.com
E
 VER
F
RIDAY IN PRINT
...
EVERY DAY ONLINE
909-621-4761
For $52 a year ($47 for seniors):
• Our print edition is mailed to your home• Full access to our award-winning website• Our popular mid-week newsletter emailwith the latest news and photos
 
Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013
3
CITY NEWS
After 2 hours of back-and-forth de-bate, the Claremont City Council de-cided not to vote on gun control, at leastfor another couple weeks.With Sam Pedroza absent from theTuesday night meeting, the council sup-ported refraining froma vote adopting a reso-lution in support of theAssault Weapons Banof 2013 until all were present. The deci-sion was made with a 3-1 vote. MayorPro Tem Opanyi Nasiali cast the dissent-ing vote because he believed the councilwas ready to make its decision.With the same 3-1 vote, Mayor LarrySchroeder will also hold off on addinghis name to the Mayors Against IllegalGuns. Voting on the resolution and peti-tion is expected to take place at the nextcouncil meeting on March 26.The assault weapons ban is currentlybeing considered by the US Congress inresponse to recent mass shootings. If ap-proved, the ban would stop “the sale,transfer, importation and manufacturingof military-style assault weapons andhigh-capacity ammunition feeding de-vices,” according to Senator Dianne Fe-instein, author of the bill.Refraining from a vote may not havebeen popular with all in the room, but themajority of the council, even with its dif-ference of opinion on the topic, left thevote undecided without qualms.“Whether you are a Democrat, a Re-publican, Libertarian, Tea Partier or de-cline to state, having a public debate of sorts that we had tonight is a win-win sit-uation,” said Mayor Larry Schroeder. “Itairs the viewpoints of everybody.”The crowd amassed at City Hall wasreflective of the nation’s divison, withequal debate from all sides of the issue.There was standing room only in theCity Council Chamber despite the rela-tively light council agenda. And notwithout reason. Issues of gun controlhave been a dominant area of debate asClaremonters and citizens across thecountry ponder the recent succession of mass shootings. In the wake of the tragicevents in Aurora, Colorado and New-town, Connecticut among others, the na-tion has remained divided on the topic of guns—is stricter gun control the answerto the problem or would it only infringeupon the Constitutional right to bearfirearms? Should guns be banned orproper gun education encouraged?These were among the questionsposed to the city council before a deci-sion would be made. Claremont resi-dents came to the meeting equipped withtheir own array of answers, from thosecalling for support of the ban to thosecalling for the city to give it a rest whenit comes to localizing national issues.“What would be appropriate is tohave a discussion, in a different venueof course, on firearms and the SecondAmendment,” suggested Claremontresident Douglas Lyon. “What is not
Council shelves vote on gun control resolution
COURIER photo/Steven FelschundneffWith a show of hands, residents indicate which side of the assault weapon ban they support during the Claremont City Councilmeeting Tuesday evening. People on both sides of the issue voiced their opinions about a resolution that would include Claremontamong cities in California that support the Assault Weapons Ban of 2013, authored by Senator Dianne Feinstein. The council de-cided to delay voting on the issue until its next meeting due to the absence of Councilmember Sam Pedroza.
CITYCOUNCIL
W
hile Claremont residents havecome to know and appreciatethe historic nature of the USBank building on the corner of Indian Hilland Foothill boulevards, there is a new as-pect to the old architecture that’s grabbingattention.
It comes in the form of photovoltaic paneling. Clare-mont’s US bank is going solar.Last month, the city approved the bank’s request to in-stall 200 solar panels on the roof and on the attached,shaded carport areas to the rear of the business, whichare expected to generate 185 kilowatts of energy per day.That’s enough to power much of the bank’s solar needson sunny days, according to bank spokesperson NicoleGarrison-Sprenger.Each solar panel is comprised of a series of reflectivephotovoltaic cells, which absorb the sun’s energy. Theenergy absorbed is then transmitted through a wire to aninverter box within the building, which converts that en-ergy to make it compatible with household appliances.Claremont’s branch is one of 4 southern California USBanks jumping on the solar bandwagon. In addition toClaremont, installations have begun in Downey, LosAlamitos and Rancho Cucamonga. The bank hopes tohave 9 banks fitted with solar panels by the end of Aprilas part of its effort to cut back on energy costs.
Bank’s use of solar panels part of ongoing movement
COURIER photo/Steven FelschundneffRobert Franco of Champion Electric installs solar panels on a new covered parking area Tuesday at the US Bankbranch on the corner of Foothill and Indian Hill boulevards in Claremont. The bank leased the panels from So-lar City as a way to offset their energy costs and create green power.ASSAULT WEAPONS BAN
continues on the next page
SOLAR PANELS
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