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Military Commissions Act

Military Commissions Act

Ratings: (0)|Views: 67|Likes:
Published by Teleprison.com
The Military Commissions Act of 2006 gives the president absolute power to decide who is an enemy of our country and to imprison people indefinitely without charging them with a crime.


Eliminates due process.
This law removes the Constitutional due process right of habeas corpus for persons the president designates as unlawful enemy combatants. It allows our government to continue to hold hundreds of prisoners more than four years without charges, with no end in sight.

Rejects core American values.
Habeas corpus, the basic right to have a court decide if a person is being lawfully imprisoned, is what separates America from other countries. To do away with this American value makes us more like those we are fighting against. It is time to restore due process, defend the Constitution, and protect what makes us Americans.

The last Congress was asleep at the wheel.
The only thing scarier than a government that would take away our basic freedoms is a Congress that would let it happen. Congress must correct that mistake and restore habeas corpus and due process, and define enemy combatants as only those who engage in hostilities against the United States.

Permits coerced evidence.
The act permits convictions based on evidence that was literally beaten out of a witness, or obtained through other abuse by either the federal government or by other countries.

Turns a blind eye to past abuses.
Government officials who authorized or ordered illegal acts of torture and abuse would receive retroactive immunity for their crimes, providing them with a ‘get out of jail free' card.

Makes the president his own judge and jury.
Under the Military Commissions Act, the president has the power to define what is — and what is not — torture and abuse, even though the Geneva Conventions already provide us with a guide.

Congress must fix the Military Commissions Act.
By giving any president the unchallenged power to decide which non-citizen is an enemy of our country — and eliminating habeas corpus due process for them, we allow the government to imprison people indefinitely without charging them with a crime. It is time for Congress to restore due process, defend the Constitution and protect what makes us Americans.

The Military Commissions Act of 2006 gives the president absolute power to decide who is an enemy of our country and to imprison people indefinitely without charging them with a crime.


Eliminates due process.
This law removes the Constitutional due process right of habeas corpus for persons the president designates as unlawful enemy combatants. It allows our government to continue to hold hundreds of prisoners more than four years without charges, with no end in sight.

Rejects core American values.
Habeas corpus, the basic right to have a court decide if a person is being lawfully imprisoned, is what separates America from other countries. To do away with this American value makes us more like those we are fighting against. It is time to restore due process, defend the Constitution, and protect what makes us Americans.

The last Congress was asleep at the wheel.
The only thing scarier than a government that would take away our basic freedoms is a Congress that would let it happen. Congress must correct that mistake and restore habeas corpus and due process, and define enemy combatants as only those who engage in hostilities against the United States.

Permits coerced evidence.
The act permits convictions based on evidence that was literally beaten out of a witness, or obtained through other abuse by either the federal government or by other countries.

Turns a blind eye to past abuses.
Government officials who authorized or ordered illegal acts of torture and abuse would receive retroactive immunity for their crimes, providing them with a ‘get out of jail free' card.

Makes the president his own judge and jury.
Under the Military Commissions Act, the president has the power to define what is — and what is not — torture and abuse, even though the Geneva Conventions already provide us with a guide.

Congress must fix the Military Commissions Act.
By giving any president the unchallenged power to decide which non-citizen is an enemy of our country — and eliminating habeas corpus due process for them, we allow the government to imprison people indefinitely without charging them with a crime. It is time for Congress to restore due process, defend the Constitution and protect what makes us Americans.

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Published by: Teleprison.com on Mar 08, 2009
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03/24/2014

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S.3930
One Hundred Ninth Congressof theUnited States of America
 ATTHESECONDSESSION
 Begun and held at the City of Washington on Tuesday,the third day of January, two thousand and six
An Act
To authorize trial by military commission for violations of the law of war, andfor other purposes.
 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.
(a) S
HORT
T
ITLE
.—This Act may be cited as the ‘‘MilitaryCommissions Act of 2006’’.(b) T
 ABLE OF
C
ONTENTS
.—The table of contents for this Actis as follows:
Sec.1.Short title; table of contents.Sec.2.Construction of Presidential authority to establish military commissions.Sec.3.Military commissions.Sec.4.Amendments to Uniform Code of Military Justice.Sec.5.Treaty obligations not establishing grounds for certain claims.Sec.6.Implementation of treaty obligations.Sec.7.Habeas corpus matters.Sec.8.Revisions to Detainee Treatment Act of 2005 relating to protection of certainUnited States Government personnel.Sec.9.Review of judgments of military commissions.Sec.10.Detention covered by review of decisions of Combatant Status Review Tri-bunals of propriety of detention.
SEC. 2. CONSTRUCTION OF PRESIDENTIAL AUTHORITY TO ESTABLISHMILITARY COMMISSIONS.
The authority to establish military commissions under chapter47A of title 10, United States Code, as added by section 3(a),may not be construed to alter or limit the authority of the Presidentunder the Constitution of the United States and laws of the UnitedStates to establish military commissions for areas declared to beunder martial law or in occupied territories should circumstancesso require.
SEC. 3. MILITARY COMMISSIONS.
(a) M
ILITARY 
C
OMMISSIONS
.—(1) I
N GENERAL
.—Subtitle A of title 10, United States Code,is amended by inserting after chapter 47 the following newchapter:
‘‘CHAPTER 47A—MILITARY COMMISSIONS
‘‘Subchapter‘‘I. General Provisions............................................................................................948a‘‘II. Composition of Military Commissions...........................................................948h‘‘III. Pre-Trial Procedure........................................................................................948q‘‘IV. Trial Procedure...............................................................................................949a‘‘V. Sentences..........................................................................................................949s
 
S.3930
2
‘‘
 VI. Post-Trial Procedure and Review of Military Commissions........................950a
‘‘
 VII. Punitive Matters...........................................................................................950p
‘‘
SUBCHAPTER I
GENERAL PROVISIONS
‘‘
Sec.
‘‘
948a. Definitions.
‘‘
948b. Military commissions generally.
‘‘
948c. Persons subject to military commissions.
‘‘
948d. Jurisdiction of military commissions.
‘‘
948e. Annual report to congressional committees.
‘‘§
948a. Definitions
‘‘
In this chapter:
‘‘
(1) U
NLAWFUL ENEMY COMBATANT
.
(A) The term
unlaw-ful enemy combatant
 means
‘‘
(i) a person who has engaged in hostilities or whohas purposefully and materially supported hostilitiesagainst the United States or its co-belligerents who isnot a lawful enemy combatant (including a person whois part of the Taliban, al Qaeda, or associated forces);or
‘‘
(ii) a person who, before, on, or after the date of the enactment of the Military Commissions Act of 2006,has been determined to be an unlawful enemy combatantby a Combatant Status Review Tribunal or another com-petent tribunal established under the authority of thePresident or the Secretary of Defense.
‘‘
(B) C
O
-
BELLIGERENT
.
In this paragraph, the term
co-belligerent
, with respect to the United States, means any Stateor armed force joining and directly engaged with the UnitedStates in hostilities or directly supporting hostilities againsta common enemy.
‘‘
(2) L
 AWFUL ENEMY COMBATANT
.
The term
lawful enemycombatant
 means a person who is
‘‘
(A) a member of the regular forces of a State partyengaged in hostilities against the United States;
‘‘
(B) a member of a militia, volunteer corps, or orga-nized resistance movement belonging to a State partyengaged in such hostilities, which are under responsiblecommand, wear a fixed distinctive sign recognizable ata distance, carry their arms openly, and abide by thelaw of war; or
‘‘
(C) a member of a regular armed force who professesallegiance to a government engaged in such hostilities,but not recognized by the United States.
‘‘
(3) A 
LIEN
.
The term
alien
 means a person who is nota citizen of the United States.
‘‘
(4) C
LASSIFIED INFORMATION
.
The term
classifiedinformation
 means the following:
‘‘
(A) Any information or material that has been deter-mined by the United States Government pursuant tostatute, Executive order, or regulation to require protectionagainst unauthorized disclosure for reasons of nationalsecurity.
‘‘
(B) Any restricted data, as that term is defined insection 11 y. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C.2014(y)).
 
S.3930
3
‘‘
(5) G
ENEVA CONVENTIONS
.
The term
Geneva Conven-tions
 means the international conventions signed at Genevaon August 12, 1949.
‘‘§
948b. Military commissions generally
‘‘
(a) P
URPOSE
.
This chapter establishes procedures governing the use of military commissions to try alien unlawful enemy combat-ants engaged in hostilities against the United States for violationsof the law of war and other offenses triable by military commission.
‘‘
(b) A 
UTHORITY FOR
M
ILITARY 
C
OMMISSIONS
U
NDER
T
HIS
C
HAPTER
.
The President is authorized to establish militarycommissions under this chapter for offenses triable by militarycommission as provided in this chapter.
‘‘
(c) C
ONSTRUCTION OF
P
ROVISIONS
.
The procedures for mili-tary commissions set forth in this chapter are based upon theprocedures for trial by general courts-martial under chapter 47of this title (the Uniform Code of Military Justice). Chapter 47of this title does not, by its terms, apply to trial by military commis-sion except as specifically provided in this chapter. The judicialconstruction and application of that chapter are not binding onmilitary commissions established under this chapter.
‘‘
(d) I
NAPPLICABILITY OF
C
ERTAIN
P
ROVISIONS
.
(1) The fol-lowing provisions of this title shall not apply to trial by militarycommission under this chapter:
‘‘
(A) Section 810 (article 10 of the Uniform Code of MilitaryJustice), relating to speedy trial, including any rule of courts-martial relating to speedy trial.
‘‘
(B) Sections 831(a), (b), and (d) (articles 31(a), (b), and(d) of the Uniform Code of Military Justice), relating to compul-sory self-incrimination.
‘‘
(C) Section 832 (article 32 of the Uniform Code of MilitaryJustice), relating to pretrial investigation.
‘‘
(2) Other provisions of chapter 47 of this title shall applyto trial by military commission under this chapter only to theextent provided by this chapter.
‘‘
(e) T
REATMENT OF
R
ULINGS AND
P
RECEDENTS
.
The findings,holdings, interpretations, and other precedents of military commis-sions under this chapter may not be introduced or considered inany hearing, trial, or other proceeding of a court-martial convenedunder chapter 47 of this title. The findings, holdings, interpreta-tions, and other precedents of military commissions under thischapter may not form the basis of any holding, decision, or otherdetermination of a court-martial convened under that chapter.
‘‘
(f) S
TATUS OF
C
OMMISSIONS
U
NDER
C
OMMON
 A 
RTICLE
3.
 A military commission established under this chapter is a regularlyconstituted court, affording all the necessary
 judicial guaranteeswhich are recognized as indispensable by civilized peoples
 for pur-poses of common Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions.
‘‘
(g) G
ENEVA 
C
ONVENTIONS
N
OT
E
STABLISHING
S
OURCE OF
R
IGHTS
.
No alien unlawful enemy combatant subject to trial bymilitary commission under this chapter may invoke the GenevaConventions as a source of rights.
‘‘§
948c. Persons subject to military commissions
‘‘
 Any alien unlawful enemy combatant is subject to trial bymilitary commission under this chapter.

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