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Ficha Phrasal-Prepositional Verbs

Ficha Phrasal-Prepositional Verbs

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Published by elsamax
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This is a worksheet that helps you develop your skills in this grammar item.

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Published by: elsamax on Mar 09, 2009
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05/10/2014

 
 
E
SCOLA
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ORMATIVE
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ORKSHEET
 
11
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MARCH 2009 1/5
Phrasal Verbs and other multi-word verbs
Analyse the table:
SINGLE
-
WORD VERB
look
 direct your eyes in a certaindirectionYou must
look
before you leap.
prepositional verbs look forlook at
 search for something orsomeonelook in the direction ofsomething or someoneI lost my keys. I must
look for
 them.I was
looking at
him when hesmiled.
phrasal verbs look uplook after
search for and findinformation in a referencebooktake care ofYou can
look up
my number inthe telephone directory.Who is
looking after
the baby?
MULTI
-
WORDVERBS
 phrasal-prepositionalverbslookforward to
 anticipate with pleasure I
look forward to
meeting you.
PP
HHRRAASSAALL 
VV
EERRBBSS
 
Phrasal verbs are made of
verb + adverb
 Phrasal verbs can be:
 
intransitive
(no direct object)
 
transitive
(direct object)Here are some examples of phrasal verbs:
examples
 
phrasal verbs
 
meaning
 
direct object
 
get up
 rise from bedI don't like to
get up
.intransitivephrasalverbs
break down
 cease to functionHe was late because his car
broke down
.
put off
 postponeWe will have to
put off
 the meeting.transitivephrasalverbs
turn down
 refuseThey
turned down
 my offer.Phrasal verbs are part of a large group of verbs called "
mmuullttii--wwoorrddvveerrbbss
".Phrasal verbs and other multi-word verbs are an important part of the English language. Multi-word verbs,including phrasal verbs, are very common, especially inssppookkeennEEnngglliisshh.A multi-word verb is a verb like "pick up", "turn on" or "get on with". For convenience, many people refer to allmulti-word verbs as phrasal verbs. These verbs consist of a
basic verb + another word or words
. The otherword(s) can be
prepositions and/or adverbs
. The two or three words that make up multi-word verbs form ashort "phrase" - which is why these verbs are often all called "phrasal verbs".The important thing to remember is that a multi-word verb is still a verb. "Get" is a verb. "Get up", is also a verb,a different verb. "Get" and "get up" are two different verbs. They do not have the same meaning. So you shouldtreat each multi-word verb as a separate verb, and learn it like any other verb.There are three types of multi-word verbs, including phrasal verbs:
 
phrasal verbs;
 
prepositional verbs;
 
phrasal-prepositional verbs..
 
 
E
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MARCH 2009 2/5
 
SS
EEPPAARRAABBLLEE 
PP
HHRRAASSAALL 
VV
EERRBBSS
 
When phrasal verbs are transitive (that is, they have a direct object), we can usually separate the two parts. Forexample, "turn down" is a
separable
phrasal verb. We can say: "
turn down
my offer" or "
turn
my offer
down
".Look at this table:They
turned
 
down
 my offer.transitive phrasal verbs are
separable
 They
turned
 my offer
down
.However, if the direct object is a
pronoun
, we have no choice. We
must
separate the phrasal verb and insert thepronoun between the two parts. Look at this example with the separable phrasal verb "switch on":
John
switched
 
on
 the radio.John
switched
 the radio
on
.John
switched
 it
on
.These are all possible.direct objectpronouns
must
gobetween thetwo parts oftransitivephrasal verbsJohn
switched
 
on
 it.This is
not
possible.
Separable or inseparable phrasal verbs?
Some dictionaries tell you when phrasal verbs are separable. If a dictionary writes "look (something) up", you knowthat the phrasal verb "look up" is separable, and you can say "look something up" and "look up something". It's agood idea to write "something/somebody" as appropriate in your vocabulary book when you learn a new phrasalverb, like this:
 
get up
 
 
break down
 
 
put
something/somebody
off
 
 
turn
sthg/sby
down
 This tells you whether the verb needs a direct object (and where to put it).
PP
RREEPPOOSSIITTIIOONNAALL 
VV
EERRBBSS
 
Prepositional verbs are made of: verb + preposition
Because a preposition always has an object,
all prepositional verbs have direct objects
, so all the prepositionalverbs are transitive.Here are some examples of prepositional verbs:
EEXXAAMMPPLLEESS
 
PPRREEPPOOSSIITTIIOONNAALLVVEERRBBSS
 
MMEEAANNIINNGG
 
direct object
 
believe in
 have faith in the existence ofI
believe in
 God.
look after
 take care ofHe is
looking after
 the dog.
talk about
 discussDid you
talk about
 me?
wait for
 awaitJohn is
waiting for
 Mary.
 
 
E
SCOLA
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ORMATIVE
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MARCH 2009 3/5
Prepositional verbs cannot be separated. That means that we cannot put the direct object between the two parts.For example, we must say "look after the baby". We cannot say "look the baby after":Who is
looking after
the baby?This is possible.prepositional verbs are
inseparable
 Who is
looking
the baby
after
? This is
not
possible.It is a good idea to write "something/somebody" in your vocabulary book when you learn a new prepositionalverb, like this:
 
believe in
something/somebody
 
look after
sthg/sbyThis reminds you that this verb needs a direct object (and where to put it).
PP
HHRRAASSAALL
--
PPRREEPPOOSSIITTIIOONNAALL 
VV
EERRBBSS
 
Phrasal-prepositional verbs are a small group of multi-word verbs made from a verb plus another word or words..Phrasal-prepositional verbs are made of:
verb + adverb + preposition
Look at these examples of phrasal-prepositional verbs:
examples
 
phrasal-prepositional verbs
 
meaning
 
direct object
 
get on with
 have a friendly relationship withHe doesn't
get on with
 his wife.
put up with
 tolerateI won't
put up with
 your attitude.
look forward to
 anticipate with pleasureI
look forward to
 seeing you.
run out of
 use up, exhaustWe have
run out of
 eggs.Because phrasal-prepositional verbs end with a preposition, there is always a
direct object
. And, like prepositionalverbs, phrasal-prepositional verbs cannot be separated. Look at these examples:We
ran out of
 fuel.phrasal-prepositional verbs are
inseparable
 We
ran out of
 it.
 
It is a good idea to write "something/somebody" in your vocabulary book when you learn a new phrasal-prepositional verb, like this:
 
get on with
somebody
 
put up with
sthg/sby
 
run out of
somethingThis reminds you that this verb needs a direct object (and where to put it).Source: englishclub.comOn the next page you can learn more about the prepositional verbs.Try to match each verb to the preposition, and then, using a dictionary, try to explain the meaning they convey (ortranslate them into Portuguese). Use the prepositions from each box placed above to fill in the table. Note that theremay be more than one possibility.

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