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Democracy Promotion During and After Bush

Democracy Promotion During and After Bush

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Despite sweeping rhetoric about the global spread of democracy, the Bush administration has significantly damaged U.S. democracy promotion efforts and increased the number of close ties with “friendly tyrants.” Security interests, such as the war on terrorism, and U.S. energy needs have led the Bush Administration to maintain friendly, unchallenged relations with more than half of the forty-five “non-free” countries in the world.

The main U.S. presidential candidates have voiced support for democracy promotion, but not yet outlined plans to put it back on track.
Despite sweeping rhetoric about the global spread of democracy, the Bush administration has significantly damaged U.S. democracy promotion efforts and increased the number of close ties with “friendly tyrants.” Security interests, such as the war on terrorism, and U.S. energy needs have led the Bush Administration to maintain friendly, unchallenged relations with more than half of the forty-five “non-free” countries in the world.

The main U.S. presidential candidates have voiced support for democracy promotion, but not yet outlined plans to put it back on track.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace on Mar 10, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/20/2014

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Thomas Carothers
During and After Bush
 
U.S. Democracy Promotion During and After Bush
Thomas Carothers
 
© 2007 Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any meanswithout permission in writing from the Carnegie Endowment. The Carnegie Endowment normally does not take institutional positions on public policyissues; the views represented here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Endowment, itsstaff, or its trustees. For electronic copies of this report, visit www.CarnegieEndowment.org/pubs.Limited print copies are also available. To request a copy, send an e-mail to pubs@CarnegieEndowment.org.Carnegie Endowment for International Peace1779 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20036Phone: 202-483-7600Fax: 202-483-1840www.CarnegieEndowment.org ABOUT THE AUTHOR Thomas Carothers is vice president for studies—international politics and governance at theCarnegie Endowment for International Peace. A leading authority on democratization anddemocracy promotion, he has researched and worked on democracy-building programsaround the world for 20 years with many U.S., European, and international organizations. Hehas written numerous books on democracy promotion including most recently
Confrontingthe Weakest Link: Aiding Political Parties in New Democracies
and
Promoting the Rule of Law Abroad: The Problem of Knowledge.
The author wishes to thank Michael Grosack for his substantial research contributions to thisreport. He is also grateful to Matthew Frumin and Jennifer Windsor for their incisive com-ments on an early draft.
ii

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