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Gargiulo Stories and Project Management

Gargiulo Stories and Project Management

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Published by Terrence Gargiulo
Stories are how we communicate and make sense of the world around us. Becoming more aware and purposeful in how we elicit people’s stories leads to more effective project communications during all phases of a project. In this first article we examined three aspects of the Initiation Phase of projects touched by stories; stakeholder analysis, initial scoping of a project, and selling the project charter. In our next article we will look at the role stories play in the Planning Phase.

Article by Camper Bull, Founding Partner & Principal, Armiger International & Terrence Gargiulo, President, MAKINGSTORIES.net
Stories are how we communicate and make sense of the world around us. Becoming more aware and purposeful in how we elicit people’s stories leads to more effective project communications during all phases of a project. In this first article we examined three aspects of the Initiation Phase of projects touched by stories; stakeholder analysis, initial scoping of a project, and selling the project charter. In our next article we will look at the role stories play in the Planning Phase.

Article by Camper Bull, Founding Partner & Principal, Armiger International & Terrence Gargiulo, President, MAKINGSTORIES.net

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Published by: Terrence Gargiulo on Mar 10, 2009
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05/24/2012

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PROJECT
 
MANAGEMENT
 
&
 
STORIES
 
By 
 
Camper 
 
Bull,
 
Founding
 
Partner 
 
&
 
Principle
 
 Armiger 
 
International 
 
&
 
Terrence
 
Gargiulo,
 
President,
 
MAKINGSTORIES.net 
 
Projects
 
are
 
devoid
 
of 
 
meaning
 
without
 
the
 
ongoing
 
role
 
of 
 
sense
 
making.
 
Let
 
me
 
start
 
by
 
telling
 
you
 
a
 
story…
 
 A
 
group
 
of 
 
top
 
notch
 
 project 
 
managers
 
like
 
you
 
climbed 
 
a
 
mountain.
 
 After 
 
a
 
rigorous
 
day 
 
of 
 
hiking
 
all 
 
day,
 
the
 
team’s
 
objectives
 
of 
 
reaching
 
the
 
summit 
 
had 
 
been
 
met 
 
with
 
 flying
 
colors.
 
Every 
 
milestone
 
hit 
 
and 
 
every 
 
critical 
 
success
 
 factor 
 
 pointing
 
to
 
a
 
complete
 
success.
 
 After 
 
adequate
 
celebration
 
and 
 
the
 
 filing
 
of 
 
the
 
all 
 
closure
 
artifacts
 
with
 
the
 
Project 
 
Management 
 
Office
 
it 
 
was
 
time
 
to
 
get 
 
off 
 
the
 
mountain.
 
With
 
the
 
sun
 
setting
 
 fast 
 
 people
 
began
 
to
 
look 
 
 for 
 
the
 
 path
 
leading
 
down
 
the
 
mountain.
 
Confusion
 
engulfed 
 
our 
 
team
 
of 
 
mighty 
 
adventurers.
 
No
 
one
 
had 
 
any 
 
idea
 
of 
 
what 
 
 path
 
to
 
take
 
and 
 
internal 
 
in
 fighting
 
threatened 
 
to
 
wreak 
 
complete
 
havoc
 
on
 
the
 
team
 
until 
 
one
 
of 
 
the
 
team
 
members
 
 pulled 
 
a
 
map
 
 from
 
their 
 
backpack.
 
Chaos
 
was
 
replaced 
 
with
 
a
 
calm
 
resolve
 
a
 
 plan
 
worthy 
 
of 
 
the
 
highest 
 
 praise
 
 from
 
even
 
the
 
Project 
 
Management 
 
Institute.
 
The
 
team
 
made
 
its
 
way 
 
down
 
the
 
mountain
 
and 
 
when
 
the
 
sun
 
rose
 
the
 
next 
 
day 
 
 people
 
glanced 
 
at 
 
the
 
map
 
only 
 
to
 
realize
 
it 
 
wasn’t 
 
a
 
map
 
of 
 
the
 
mountain.
 
Sound
 
familiar?
 
The
 
map
 
was
 
a
 
vehicle
 
of 
 
sense
 
making.
 
Whether
 
it
 
was
 
right
 
or
 
wrong
 
was
 
inconsequential
 
(at
 
least
 
in
 
our
 
story).
 
The
 
map
 
gave
 
people
 
a
 
sense
 
of 
 
purpose,
 
direction,
 
and
 
action
 
tied
 
to
 
the
 
map.
 
Everyone
 
was
 
on
 
the
 
same
 
page.
 
The
 
map
 
is
 
a
 
metaphor
 
for
 
stories.
 
According
 
to
 
author
 
and
 
President
 
of 
 
MAKINGSTORIES.net
 
Terrence
 
Gargiulo,
 
stories
 
are
 
fundamental
 
to
 
how
 
we
 
communicate,
 
learn
 
and
 
think.
 
Stories
 
are
 
how
 
we
 
make
 
sense
 
of 
 
what
 
is
 
happening
 
around
 
us.
 
We
 
cannot
 
divorce
 
ourselves
 
from
 
looking
 
for
 
patterns.
 
We
 
are
 
pattern
 
machines.
 
Stories
 
are
 
the
 
language
 
we
 
use
 
to
 
articulate
 
and
 
guide
 
our
 
actions.
 
Stories
 
can
 
play
 
a
 
central
 
role
 
in
 
project
 
management.
 
For
 
the
 
sake
 
of 
 
this
 
article,
 
consider
 
stories
 
in
 
a
 
much
 
broader
 
light
 
than
 
you
 
may
 
be
 
accustomed
 
to
 
think
 
of.
 
Stories
 
do
 
not
 
need
 
to
 
be
 
told
 
and
 
stories
 
do
 
not
 
need
 
to
 
have
 
Hollywood
 
perfectly
 
crafted
 
beginning,
 
middle,
 
and
 
ends.
 
In
 
this
 
article
 
we
 
take
 
a
 
look
 
at
 
some
 
of 
 
the
 
ways
 
stories
 
can
 
be
 
used
 
to
 
manage
 
your
 
projects
 
to
 
success.
 
In
 
this
 
three
 
part
 
article
 
we’ll
 
walk
 
through
 
the
 
PMBOK
 
process
 
groups
 
and
 
identify
 
where
 
and
 
how
 
stories
 
fit.
 
This
 
article
 
assumes
 
you
 
are
 
acquainted
 
with
 
these
 
process
 
groups
 
(Initiating,
 
Planning,
 
Executing,
 
Monitoring/Controlling,
 
Closing).
 
Initiation
 
Phase
 
Projects
 
are
 
the
 
vision
 
of 
 
a
 
solution
 
to
 
a
 
problem.
 
Stories
 
drive
 
visions.
 
The
 
stories
 
we
 
collect
 
from
 
constituents
 
in
 
need
 
of 
 
a
 
solution,
 
helps
 
us
 
to
 
envision
 
a
 
project.
 
When
 
we
 
elicit
 
people’s
 
day
 
to
 
day
 
experiences
 
or
 
ideas
 
of 
 
the
 
future
 
we
 
are
 
working
 
with
 
stories.
 
Descriptions
 
and
 
facts
 
paint
 
a
 
slow
 
cumbersome
 
picture
 
wrought
 
with
 
the
 
seduction
 
of 
 
rational
 
certainty
 
while
 
being
 
riddled
 
with
 
blind
 
 
©
2009,
 
Armiger
 
International
 
&
 
MAKINGSTORIES.net,
 
Camper
 
Bull
 
&
 
Terrence
 
Gargiulo,
 
All
 
rights
 
reserved
 
2
spots.
 
Granted
 
the
 
facts
 
and
 
details
 
give
 
us
 
the
 
crucial
 
data
 
to
 
support
 
our
 
recommendations.
 
However,
 
if 
 
we
 
collect
 
only
 
facts
 
our
 
picture
 
will
 
be
 
incomplete.
 
It’s
 
unlikely
 
we’ll
 
be
 
able
 
to
 
collaboratively
 
craft
 
a
 
solution
 
that
 
addresses
 
the
 
root
 
of 
 
the
 
problem.
 
We
 
can
 
get
 
to
 
the
 
heart
 
of 
 
the
 
problem
 
quicker
 
when
 
we
 
get
 
people
 
to
 
speak
 
about
 
their
 
experiences.
 
People’s
 
experiences
 
are
 
stored
 
in
 
their
 
minds
 
as
 
stories.
 
The
 
more
 
we
 
help
 
people
 
share
 
the
 
richness
 
of 
 
their
 
experiences
 
in
 
the
 
form
 
of 
 
narratives,
 
the
 
better
 
our
 
understanding
 
will
 
be
 
of 
 
the
 
problem
 
domain.
 
So
 
how
 
do
 
you
 
tell
 
the
 
difference
 
between
 
someone
 
offering
 
an
 
explanation
 
or
 
description
 
and
 
the
 
richer
 
form
 
of 
 
communication
 
offered
 
by
 
stories?
 
Here
 
are
 
few
 
guiding
 
questions
 
to
 
get
 
you
 
started:
 
1.
 
 Are
 
they 
 
speaking
 
 from
 
their 
 
 personal 
 
experiences
 
or 
 
are
 
they 
 
speaking
 
in
 
general 
 
terms? 
 
2.
 
 Are
 
there
 
little
 
tangents
 
in
 
what 
 
they 
 
share? 
 
Listen
 
 for 
 
descriptive
 
elements,
 
elaboration
 
of 
 
ancillary 
 
details
 
that 
 
 paint 
 
a
 
more
 
vivid 
 
 picture,
 
editorial 
 
comments,
 
references
 
to
 
other 
 
experiences,
 
the
 
use
 
of 
 
analogies,
 
metaphors,
 
 perhaps
 
even
 
 jokes
 
to
 
illustrate
 
their 
 
descriptions.
 
3.
 
Do
 
you
 
detect 
 
any 
 
emotion? 
 
This
 
will 
 
vary 
 
 from
 
 person
 
to
 
 person.
 
It 
 
may 
 
be
 
subtle
 
but 
 
if 
 
 people
 
are
 
telling
 
you
 
a
 
story 
 
you
 
will 
 
notice
 
nuances
 
of 
 
emotions? 
 
4.
 
What’s
 
your 
 
level 
 
of 
 
engagement 
 
as
 
a
 
listener? 
 
Stories
 
engage
 
us
 
in
 
active
 
listening.
 
We
 
are
 
not 
 
 fighting
 
off 
 
the
 
incessant 
 
streaming
 
distractions
 
of 
 
our 
 
minds
 
or 
 
the
 
desire
 
to
 
speak 
 
our 
 
mind.
 
Remember
 
to
 
adjust
 
your
 
expectation
 
of 
 
what
 
constitutes
 
a
 
story.
 
Look
 
for
 
threads
 
and
 
fragments
 
of 
 
stories.
 
These
 
can
 
be
 
very
 
short
 
and
 
sandwiched
 
in
 
between
 
common
 
forms
 
of 
 
communication.
 
You
 
will
 
use
 
the
 
stories
 
you
 
collect
 
to
 
piece
 
together
 
a
 
tapestry
 
of 
 
understanding.
 
As
 
you
 
scan
 
the
 
stories
 
you
 
will
 
begin
 
to
 
observe
 
patterns
 
of 
 
meaning.
 
Liken
 
this
 
crisscrossing
 
intersection
 
of 
 
patterns
 
and
 
meanings
 
to
 
a
 
computer
 
network
 
with
 
nodes.
 
Think
 
of 
 
it
 
as
 
a
 
network
 
of 
 
meaning.
 
Insight
 
does
 
not
 
sit
 
in
 
one
 
node
 
of 
 
the
 
network
 
or
 
one
 
story.
 
Some
 
stories
 
are
 
stronger
 
than
 
others,
 
attracting
 
weaker
 
or
 
isolated
 
nodes
 
of 
 
meanings.
 
These
 
stronger
 
stories
 
will
 
naturally
 
facilitate
 
your
 
projection
 
of 
 
meaning.
 
Use
 
them
 
to
 
help
 
you
 
connect
 
other
 
stories
 
to
 
them.
 
This
 
is
 
a
 
circular
 
process.
 
Once
 
you
 
generate
 
a
 
map
 
of 
 
the
 
terrain
 
you
 
cannot
 
stop
 
there.
 
Like
 
the
 
Project
 
Management
 
cycle
 
of 
 
Planning
Executing/Controlling
and
Planning
 
sense
 
making
 
never
 
ends.
 
Like
 
a
 
detective,
 
as
 
you
 
add
 
more
 
clues
 
you
 
redraw
 
your
 
map;
 
after
 
all
 
not
 
 just
 
any
 
map
 
will
 
get
 
you
 
off 
 
the
 
mountain.
 
 
©
2009,
 
Armiger
 
International
 
&
 
MAKINGSTORIES.net,
 
Camper
 
Bull
 
&
 
Terrence
 
Gargiulo,
 
All
 
rights
 
reserved
 
3
Almost
 
any
 
aspect
 
of 
 
collecting
 
the
 
information
 
for
 
the
 
Project
 
Charter
 
is
 
touched
 
by
 
story
based
 
communications.
 
For
 
the
 
sake
 
of 
 
this
 
article
 
let’s
 
focus
 
on
 
three:
 
1.
 
Stakeholder
 
Analysis
 
2.
 
Initial
 
Project
 
Scope
 
3.
 
Selling
 
the
 
Project
 
Charter
 
Stakeholder 
 
 Analysis
 
Stakeholders
 
will
 
make
 
or
 
break
 
the
 
success
 
of 
 
a
 
project.
 
This
 
is
 
truly
 
irrational
 
stuff.
 
What
 
are
 
the
 
assumptions
 
people
 
are
 
making
 
about
 
a
 
project?
 
What
 
historical
 
filters
 
are
 
coloring
 
their
 
views
 
of 
 
our
 
project?
 
Do
 
we
 
understand
 
what’s
 
in
 
it
 
for
 
them?
 
What’s
 
the
 
quickest
 
way
 
to
 
amass
 
and
 
manage
 
our
 
way
 
through
 
all
 
these
 
perceptions?
 
And
 
where
 
there
 
are
 
pockets
 
of 
 
potential
 
resistance
 
how
 
can
 
we
 
use
 
our
 
influence
 
to
 
make
 
sure
 
these
 
do
 
not
 
become
 
obstacles
 
that
 
capsize
 
our
 
project?
 
Try
 
to
 
see
 
every
 
stakeholder
 
as
 
an
 
actor
 
on
 
a
 
stage.
 
Start
 
by
 
understanding
 
each
 
character
 
in
 
your
 
play.
 
Every
 
character
 
in
 
a
 
play
 
has
 
a
 
background
 
that
 
informs
 
the
 
play’s
 
unfolding
 
story
 
but
 
which
 
may
 
not
 
be
 
directly
 
included
 
in
 
the
 
actions
 
or
 
dialogues
 
of 
 
the
 
play.
 
This
 
is
 
the
 
background
 
stuff.
 
Too
 
often
 
we
 
are
 
compelled
 
to
 
convince
 
others
 
of 
 
why
 
our
 
project
 
is
 
so
 
important
 
and
 
why
 
they
 
should
 
be
 
enthusiastic
 
supporters
 
of 
 
our
 
efforts.
 
We
 
don’t
 
always
 
take
 
the
 
time
 
to
 
hear
 
other
 
people’s
 
viewpoints.
 
We
 
set
 
our
 
agenda
 
and
 
off 
 
we
 
go.
 
Even
 
if 
 
we
 
give
 
people’s
 
perspectives
 
air
 
time
 
we
 
aren’t
 
listening
 
with
 
our
 
story
 
ears.
 
In
 
other
 
words
 
we
 
are
 
probably
 
not
 
ready
 
to
 
make
 
sense
 
of 
 
what’s
 
important
 
to
 
this
 
other
 
person
 
and
 
how
 
that
 
might
 
provide
 
unanticipated
 
fuel
 
for
 
a
 
collaborative
 
idea
 
not
 
in
 
our
 
line
 
of 
 
sight.
 
Okay,
 
it’s
 
counter
 
intuitive
 
but
 
according
 
to
 
story
 
expert
 
Terrence
 
Gargiulo,
 
“the
 
shortest
 
distance
 
between
 
two
 
people
 
is
 
a
 
story.”
 
Listening
 
to
 
our
 
stakeholders
 
share
 
their
 
stories
 
can
 
lead
 
to
 
very
 
positive
 
outcomes
 
for
 
our
 
project.
 
In
 
these
 
stories
 
we
 
will
 
be
 
able
 
to
 
understand
 
what
 
is
 
important
 
to
 
them
 
and
 
why.
 
Sometimes
 
the
 
very
 
act
 
of 
 
being
 
listened
 
to
 
opens
 
up
 
people
 
to
 
the
 
possibility
 
of 
 
taking
 
an
 
active
 
interest
 
in
 
our
 
viewpoints.
 
Of 
 
course
 
there
 
are
 
those
 
rare
 
times
 
when
 
no
 
matter
 
how
 
hard
 
you
 
try
 
to
 
make
 
an
 
open
 
space
 
for
 
other
 
people’s
 
stories
 
they
 
will
 
not
 
trust
 
you
 
or
 
the
 
situation
 
enough
 
to
 
share
 
them;
 
perhaps
 
they
 
have
 
been
 
burned
 
too
 
many
 
times
 
(from
 
Charles
 
Schultzt’s
 
cartoon
 
Peanuts
 
imagine
 
the
 
Charlie
 
Brown
 
and
 
Lucy
 
syndrome
 
with
 
the
 
football).
 
These
 
are
 
few
 
and
 
far
 
between.
 
Like
 
any
 
good
 
project
 
manager
 
we
 
are
 
triaging
 
where,
 
when,
 
and
 
how
 
to
 
spend
 
our
 
finite
 
energy
 
and
 
time.
 
So
 
there’s
 
no
 
need
 
to
 
be
 
Don
 
Quixote
 
and
 
chase
 
after
 
windmill
 
stakeholders;
 
those
 
impossible
 
stakeholder
 
who
 
will
 
never
 
become
 
champions
 
of 
 
our
 
projects.
 
As
 
you
 
make
 
the
 
rounds
 
between
 
stakeholders
 
you
 
will
 
be
 
surprised
 
how
 
people’s
 
needs
 
now
 
encoded
 
in
 
the
 
collage
 
of 
 
stories
 
you
 
have
 
been
 
collecting
 
inter
relate
 
with
 
one
 
another.
 
You
 
will
 
have
 
stories
 
to
 
tell
 
that
 
match
 
or
 
at
 
least
 
dovetail
 
with
 
the
 
needs
 
and
 
agendas
 
of 
 
others.
 

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