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16032013 Somalia - Fishing Industry

16032013 Somalia - Fishing Industry

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It’s early morning in Mogadishu and fisherman in the Somali capital are bringing their catch in to the harbor. Somalia’s 3,300 kilometre coastline - the continent’s longest - gives the country’s fishermen access to over 400 different species of fish in both the Indian Ocean in the east, and Gulf of Aden in the north. Decades of insecurity has made it difficult for most fishermen here to cash in on their country’s rich fish stocks.

In the 1980’s the government of former president Siad Barre created fishing cooperatives and legislation to regulate and develop the sector, as well as manage its fleet of five fishing trawlers operating in Kismayo and its other ports. But like most of country’s infrastructure and economy, the fishing industry was devastated during the civil war that followed Barre’s ouster in 1991.
It’s early morning in Mogadishu and fisherman in the Somali capital are bringing their catch in to the harbor. Somalia’s 3,300 kilometre coastline - the continent’s longest - gives the country’s fishermen access to over 400 different species of fish in both the Indian Ocean in the east, and Gulf of Aden in the north. Decades of insecurity has made it difficult for most fishermen here to cash in on their country’s rich fish stocks.

In the 1980’s the government of former president Siad Barre created fishing cooperatives and legislation to regulate and develop the sector, as well as manage its fleet of five fishing trawlers operating in Kismayo and its other ports. But like most of country’s infrastructure and economy, the fishing industry was devastated during the civil war that followed Barre’s ouster in 1991.

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Published by: AMISOM Public Information Services on Mar 19, 2013
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STORY: SOMALIA - FISHING INDUSTRY
 
TRT: 04:55
 
SOURCE: AU/UN IST
 
RESTRICTIONS: This media asset is free for editorialbroadcast, print, online and radio use. It is not to be soldon and is restricted for other purposes.All enquiries to news@auunist.org
CREDIT REQUIRED: AU/UN IST
 
LANGUAGE: SOMALI/NATS
 
DATELINE: 16 MARCH 2013, MOGADISHU, SOMALIA
 
SHOTLIST:
 
1. Wide shot, fisherman carrying his nets
 
2. Med shot, fisherman walking with his net
 
3. Med shot, fisherman next to their boats
 
4. Wide shot, fishing boats at the harbor 
 
5. Med shot, fisherman carrying his boat motor 
 
6. Close up, boats floating
 
7. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Mohammad Muzee, Fisherman:
 
“The equipment we use, like the boats, was inherited from our fathers. They
are not new,our fathers used them and now we are using them. You would not dare get into any of 
them, because they’re very old and you would be scared for your life, but we use thembecause that’s how we make our living. ”
 
8. Med shot, boats on the water 
 
9. Med shot, fishermen bringing in their catch
 
10. Close up, fish inside a boat
 
11. Close up, man eating
 
12. Med shot, young men carrying fish on their heads
 
13. Med shot, young man carrying fish to market
 
14. Wide shot, men carrying fish to the market
 
15. Med shot, man with fish on his head walking to the market
 
16. Wide shot, man walking down the street with fish
 
17. Med shot, man with fish on a bike going to the fish market
 
18. Wide shot, inside the fish market
 
19. Med shot, marlin fish on the ground
 
20. Wide shot, man laying fish on the ground in the market
 
21. Med shot, man laying more fish on the ground
 
22. Med shot, fishermongers chatting
 
23. Close up, man sharpening his knives and cutting the fish
 
24. Med shot, man cutting up fish
 
25. Close up, fish
 
26. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Ahmed Moumin Ekar, Fishmonger:
 
“Sometimes it’s a lot, at other times its only a little. When the catch is small, we get 12US dollars per kilogram for kingfish, but when we’ve got a lot, its 6 dollars per kilogram.
Today, the king
fish are very few and it’s always in great demand.”
 
27. Med shot, fishmonger cutting fish steaks
 
 
28. Close up, fish steaks
 
29. Wide shot, Abdirizak Omar Mohamed, Minister of Natural Resources
 
30. SOUNDBITE (English) Abdirizak Omar Mohamed, Minister of Natural Resources:
 
“ We don’t have coast guard to guard our sea, so because of that there is a lot of illegal
and unregulated fishing taking place in our sea. We have nor the means nor the capacity
to do anything at this time, but it’s within the policy of the
government to address that
issue.”
 
31. Wide shot, workers at the Somali National Fishing Company preparing fish for export
 
32. Med shot, workers packing fish for export
 
33. Close up, ice being put into the box
 
34. Wide shot, export box being sealed
 
35. SOUNDBITE (English) Hassan Warsame Noor, Marketing & International RelationsManager, Somali National Fishing Company:
 
“ We
were sending to up to five countries before, now we have minimized only to onecountry Turkey. Since there is no transport from here to Turkey, although there is no
transport from here to Turkey, yes there is a Turkish airline, but they don’t have a fridg
eand cargo site in that airline. Because of that what we do is that we take the fish fromMogadishu to Nairobi, our product transits in Nairobi for sometimes hours an hours, after that we get a flight from Nairobi to Turkey. Every person can imagine how i
t’s difficult tokeep the fish for that time.”
 
36. Wide shot, workers taking fresh fish steaks to the cold room
 
37. Med shot, cold room at the Somalia National Fishing Company
 
38. Med shot, packed fish in the cold room
 
39. Wide shot, tilt of frozen fish
 
STORY:
 
It’s early morning in Mogadishu and fisherman in the Somali capital are bringing their catch in to the harbor. Somalia’s 3,300 kilometre coastline
-
the continent’s longest
-
gives the country’s fishermen access to over 400 different species of fish
in both theIndian Ocean in the east, and Gulf of Aden in the north.
 
But decades of insecurity has made it difficult for most fishermen here to cash in on their 
country’s rich fish stocks.
 
“The equipment we use, like the boats, was inherited from our fat
hers. They are not new,our fathers used them and now we are using them. You would not dare get into any of 
them, because they’re very old and you would be scared for your life, but we use thembecause that’s how we make our living,” says Mohammad Muzee, o
ne of the mostlyartisanal and small-
scale fishermen that operate in Somalia’s waters.
 
In the 1980’s the government of former president Siad Barre created fishing
cooperatives and legislation to regulate and develop the sector, as well as manage itsfleet of five fishing trawlers operating in Kismayo and its other ports.
But like most of country’s infrastructure and economy, the fishing industry wasdevastated during the civil war that followed Barre’s ouster in 1991. Pirates took charge
of many stretche
s of Somalia’s coastline and foreign trawlers were seen fishing here
illegally as the transitional government battled al Qaeda-linked group al Shabaab for control of the country.
 

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