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Pennington Co. Courant, March 21, 2013

Pennington Co. Courant, March 21, 2013

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Number 12Volume 108March 21, 2013
 
by Larie Hindman
Sanford Underground labspokesperson Bill Harlan was theguest speaker for the Wall Bad-lands Area Chamber of Commercemeeting.Harlan who is the communica-tion director for the lab reportedthat the lab has received $40.2million from the State of SouthDakota and $261.5 million fromnon-state funding in which 112million has been spent in SouthDakota of which 14 million hasgone to business contracts in thestate.The lab has also hosted over5,000 students and close to 1,000teachers.Harlan then gave an update onthe underground lab projects andshowed time lapse videos of howthe different labs were con-structed.Mayor Dave Hahn informedmember of the upcoming annualmeeting for the Wall AmbulanceDistrict that will be held on March21 at the Wall Community Centerwith the meeting beginning at 7:00
Communications Director Bill Harlan with the Sanford Under-ground lab was the guest speaker at the Wall Badlands AreaChamber of Commerce meeting held on Monday, March 11 at theRed Rock Resteraunt.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Chamber gets an update on Sanford Underground Lab
p.m.Wendy Brunnemann with theWall Library handed out flyers tobe placed around town. She notedthat every Friday at 9:00 a.m. isstory time and the last Wednesdayof every month is Book Club. Thelibrary has received new comput-ers and they also have e-booksavailable.Superintendent Dennis Rieck-man with the Wall School an-nounced the girls basketball teamplaced seventh at the State B tour-nament. The Children’s Theaterwas very well done and received,and students are testing for thepilot benchmark assessment tests.Eric Brunnemann Superintend-ent of the Badlands National Parkreported their budget was cut by$215,000 due to the sequestration.The park is still planning on hiringpeople to work in their differentvisitor services but will vacatethree upper staff positions.Duane Bubac with the Minute-man Missile National Historic Sitenoted they will also lapse a coupleof different positions.Greg Oleson from Golden Westsaid letters have been mailed outinforming customers of the newdigital boxes that will be needed toreceive their programming.Dawn Hilgenkamp with WestRiver Electric reminded membersthat the deadline for attendingtheir one day trip to Gillette isMay 1.Black Hills Federal CreditUnion is hosting a drop box forgently used books to be donated tovarious groups around the commu-nity, said Robyn Miller.Brett Blasius announced thatFirst Interstate Bank has twoscholarships available to local sen-iors.Carol Hoffman reported Coun-try Cupboard has given out 7,000pounds of food in the last year andare planning to do the same forthis year.Donna Curr reported the RodeoBooster Club has elected new offi-cers and if anyone is interested inbecoming a member their meet-ings are held on the third Wednes-day of every month at the rodeogrounds.Rod Renner gave a brief expla-nation of what Stronger EconomicsTogether (SET) means and whatthe community is working towards
By Elizabeth “Sam” GrszCmmnity News Service
Legislators finished their workby passing a $4.1 billion generalappropriation bill March 8, encom-passing more money for schoolsand Medicaid providers than inthe most recent past.Not everyone was happy, how-ever, with the allocation of fundsduring the final garnering of amendments to HB1185, and$1.72 million was left on the tableunallocated. But legislators wereassured that $1.7 million was nottoo much.Rep. Susan Wismer, D-Britton, afrequent critic of how the statespends its money, said last year’s$1.6 million left on the table hadresulted in $47 million going into
Sen. Mark Kirkeby, Rapid City, and Sen. Jean Hunhoff, Yankton,both Republicans, shake hands after the final vote of the 2013S.D. Legislature was taken shortly before midnight March 8.Both houses passed a $4.1 billion bill for fiscal year 2014. Edu-cation received 46 percent of the general fund, or $601.9 million.Medicare providers followed with 39 percent, criminal justice, 10percent; and the remainder of state government, five percent.Legislators return Monday, March 25, after a two-week break inthe action, for the final day.
~Photo Elizabeth Grosz 
Legislature passes $4.1 billion budget on final day of main run
reserves. She opposed passage of the bill “with that amount of money unappropriated.”Wismer, fellow Democrats, andseveral renegade Republicanswere critical of the money thatshould or could have gone to helpK-12 education and Medicareproviders, but instead was spenton constructing new buildings,tearing down old buildings andputting more money into reserves.Sen. Billie Sutton, D-Burke, whoalso serves on the Joint Appropri-ations Committee, was generallykinder and more conciliatory in hisattempt to amend the budget. But,the frustration was evident. Theattempt had been to give Medicareproviders another $4.6 million andeducation another $2.1 million,both in one-time money.They also sought to provide$21,000 to a veteran’s service pro-grams, which helps pay vehicle ex-penses for volunteer drivers whotransport veterans to medical ap-pointments.It would also have taken away$500,000 that appropriation com-mittee legislators had voted forLegislative Research Council pro-grams that assist legislators.Key Republicans, on the otherhand, were happy with the resultsof the budget work.Sen. Deb Peters, R-Hartford,who chairs the Senate side of theJoint Appropriations Committee,said “once again, education re-ceived the first dollar and the lastby attending the meetings held indifferent local towns.Black Hills Badlands and Lakesboard member Gina Ferris re-ported she and four other mem-bers recently returned from Hous-ton, Texas. They visited differenttravel agencies to promote the di-rect flight from Rapid City toHouston. Ferris added this was agreat opportunity to let peopleknow that South Dakota is muchmore than Mt. Rushmore. The newvacation guides are in.Bill Bielmaier announced thatCarroll McDonald American Le-gion Post #246 is planning theirMemorial Day Services at the WallCommunity Center for May 27,2013. The 7th Calvary Drum andBugle Corp., will be a part of theprogram with a patriotic musicconcert starting at 12:45 p.m. TheMemorial Services will start at1;40 p.m. with Pastor Ron Burtzbeing the guest speaker.After services at the communitycenter, the American Legion willhave a ceremony at the VeteransMemorial at the Wall Cemetery.Memorial Wreath’s will be placedand names of deceased veteransburied in the Wall Cemetery willbe honored by announcing eachname. There will be three newnames added to the memorial listsince last year.Quinn VFW plan to hold theirMemorial Service on the morningof May 27.President Mary Williams readthe following announcements:•March 21: Ambulance Districtannual meeting, Wall CommunityCenter - 7:00 p.m.•April 4: Wall NeighborhoodHousing Council, Wall CommunityCenter - noon.•April 4: Wall NeighborhoodHousing Presentation, Wall Com-munity Center - afternoon.•April 4: Wall City Councilmeeting, Wall Community Centermeeting room - 6:30 p.m.•April 12: Wall Chamber annualmeeting and awards banquet, WallCommunity Center, 5:00 p.m. PaulGoldhammer will receive the Life-time Achievement Award.•April 20: Good Neighbor Ban-quet, Philip High School Gymna-sium - 6:00 p.m.With no other business themeeting was adjourned.Don Kjerstad son of Evelyn andthe late George Kjerstad, who isformally from Wall and the Quinnarea, has been battling Parkin-son’s disease for the pass threeand half years.Symptoms of the disease for Donwere loss of voice, loss of balance,slow brain functions and slighttremors.Parkinson disease is a disorderof the brain that eventually leadsto shaking, movement and coordi-nation problems.Don’s mother Evelyn writes thatresearch has found that throughlots of exercise, modern medica-tions and voice therapy, these willhelp to slow and control the dis- 
by Larie Hindman
The Wall City Council held aspecial meeting on Wednesday,March 13.Council members present were:Bill Leonard, Pete Dunker, RickHustead and Mike Anderson. Stan Anderson and Jerry Morgan wereabsent.Mayor Dave Hahn called themeeting to order.The agenda was approved forthe meeting.President Brett Blasius of theWall Health Services came beforethe board with financial concernsfor the clinic. At the last councilmeeting the council members de-nied a pay request for $8,500 tothe clinic.Blasius and the council wentover the financial statements anddue to certain circumstances theclinic is having a cash flow short-age.Blasius also informed the coun-cil that he is quite concerned aboutthe future of the clinic which willbe discussed at a future date.Council approved the pay request.Before the council moved intoexecutive session for the purposeof discussing personnel issues ac-cording to SDCL 1-25-2, Hahnasked the city employees if theyhad any comments to make. Withno comments being made the coun-cil moved into executive session.Council entered out of executivesessions with no motions being-made.The council approved the Hilde-brand land plot and the meetingwas adjourned.ease. Don gets lots of exercise andhas joined the “Tremble Clefs” (aSun City, Ariz. singing group thatconsists of Parkinson’s patientsand their caregivers.)They practice two hours everyWednesday, and they sing aboutfour times a month at assisted liv-ing centers, nursing homes,churches and rv resorts.The “Sun City Tremble Clefs”consist of 45 members. Five of them were selected to sing at Mo-hammed Ali’s Celebrity Social onMarch 22nd before Fight Night.Last year Ali’s Fight Night raisedover eight million dollars to helpfight Parkinson’s Disease.
by Larie Hindman
The Wall School Board had atough decision to make at theirWednesday, March 13 meeting.President Scot Eisenbraunasked the board what theirthoughts were on the Big WhiteSchool, if they should vote to makeit a K-5, K-6 or K-8 school.Spencer Cordes said, he couldsee both sides of the issue andwould like the school to be a K-8.Mary Williams commented shehas spoken to teachers who havetaught at country schools andstated, “How can one teacher ad-dress K-8 and not let somethingslip.” She went on to say we needto revisit having the Big White bea K-6 school.Carolynn Anderson said, she at-tended country school and we areexpecting a lot from one teacherand now is the time to be proac-tive.Eisenbraun related maybe weare a year to late but I think weshould start too implement tech-nology at the Big White with onesubject instead of three in oneyear.Superintendent Dennis Rieck-man said, he would be fine with K-8. He noted that technology doeswell in town but is not sold ontechnology for out there and weare asking for to much of these twogirls if that is what the board de-cides. He also said if the board de-cides to make the school K-8 wewill have to hire another teacherfor two years.Todd Trask said, he is not infavor of hiring another teacherwith the budget being as tight as itis.Jeff Gabriel, who has childrenattending Big White, is trying tolook at this from the boards point.He reasoned that the board shouldgo through all their options and ex-plore each one before splittingyoung families up. He added if something fails it fails but at leastit was tried.Williams said she could totallyhear what Gabriel was saying butgrades K-3 are the most importantand she doesn’t know if the boardcan address both ends of the spec-trum. Williams wanted to knowhow can one teacher get it doneunless we hire two teacher towhich Trask said again he is not infavor of hiring another teacher.A motion was made to make BigWhite a K-6 school next year withTrask, Williams, Anderson andJohnson voting yea and KevinBielmaier, Cordes and Eisenbraunvoting nay. The motion passed.Jeanine Sykora and Diane Gei-gle came before the board on be-half of the Children’s Theater andrequested to have the project in-cluded into next years budget.They have applied to SouthDakota Art’s Council for a grantand have two cooperate sponsorsbut would like the board to coverany other cost if the need arises.The board approved a motion tobudget up to $2,500 for the Chil-dren’s Theater.Power Assisted Handicap doorswere approved for installation.The third readings for the Vol-unteer and Staff Developmentpolicies were approved.Elementary Principal ChuckSykora reported letters have beensent out for kindergarten screen-ing.Rieckman, asked if there wereany questions on the 2013-2014school calendar. The board dis-cussed Christmas vacation datesand decided to have school beginon January 6, 2014. Rieckman willmake the adjustments to the cal-endar with the motion approved bythe board.Track and Golf rules were ap-proved.Rieckman, who went to Wash-ington D.C. for an Impact Aidmeeting, updated the board onvarious concerns that are happen-ing with the program and pay-ments.Capital Outlay requests will bebrought to the board next month.The board approved the consentagenda for:•Minutes of February 13, 2013board meeting.•March claims.A motion to enter into executivesession for the purpose of dis-cussing personnel and negotia-tions, according to SDCL 1-25-2was approved.During executive session theboard complete the superintendentevaluation.With no other business after ex-ecutive session, the meeting wasadjourned.
Wall School Board votes 4 - 3to make Big White a K-6 school
The Chrches f Wall invite y t Hly Week Services12:10 p.m. Wall Drg Travelers Chapel
•Monday, March 25, Pastor Ron Burtz, Evangelical Free BibleChurch•Tuesday, March 26, Pastor Darwin Kopfmann, United MethodistChurch•Wednesday, March 27, Father Leo Hausmann, St. Patrick’s CatholicChurch•Thursday, March 28, Pastor Curtis Garland, First Lutheran ChurchAn offering will be received each day for the benefit of the WallChurch Response.
After an emotional discussion and gut wreching decision theWall School Board voted to move Big White to a K-6 school.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
Kjerstad fights Parkinson’s disease
City Council holds special meeting
 
by Larie Hindman
Wall City Council met on Friday,March 15 for a special meetingconcerning the Public Works Di-rector position.Council approved a motion toenter into executive session for thepurpose of discussing personnel is-sues according to SDCL 1-25-2 at8:05 a.m.Council met with Garrett Byranduring the executive session andmoved out of the meeting at 8:16a.m.Public Works Director Jeff Clarkand City Employee Jim Kittermanwere present for the remainder of the meeting.A motion was made and ap-proved for the following:Mayor Dave Hahn announcedthat effective March 18, 2013, Gar-rett Byran will take over as thenew Public Works Director. Hissalary will increase by $5,000.Bryan will be on a six month pro-bation period and after this timehe will then have another evalua-tion and if he has a positive reviewhe will be given another raise.The mayor informed Bryan thathe will need to e-mail the mayor,finance officer and council mem-bers a schedule of the previouswork day accomplishments andwhat work they will be doing thenext day. Hahn stressed to Bryanthat a line of communicationsneeds to be open at all time be-tween the city and his department.Garrett was informed what hispriorities as the Public Works De-partment Head will entail:•Safety, security and under-standing the chain-of-command.•That ALL compliance issuesare positively complied within atimely manner.•ALL wells (water sources) aremaintained to the highest stan-dards.•Establish work tasks and dele-gate responsibilites (keed comptime to a minimum).At this time the council also de-cided to downsize the Public WorksDepartment effective October, 12013. Hahn stated, “With Clark’shealth issues they would keep himon until October 1.” Hahn notedhis salary will also be cut. RickHustead said, going forward withthe city of Wall the departmentcould be taken care of by two peo-ple with a money savings means tobe city.Hahn noted that seasonal sum-mer help will be hired to help withmowing and other jobs.With no other questions themeeting was adjourned.
Wall City Council approves GarrettByran as new Public Works Director 
(continued on page 2)
 
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Established in 1906. The PenningtonCo. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinnand Wasta, and the school district in Wall,SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-lications, Inc. The Pennington CountyCourant office is located on the corner of 4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
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Pennington County Courant • March 21, 2013 •
Page 2
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The annual District 2 SpringMeeting of the South Dakota American Legion will be held Sun-day, March 24, 2013 in Hermosafor Legionnaires from Bennett,Haakon, Jackson, Jones, Mellette,Todd, Custer, Fall River, Penning-ton and Shannon counties.The Legion business session willbegin at 1:00 p.m. at the Hermosa American Legion Post Home. A so-cial and lunch will be held from 12-1. There will be an Executivemeeting at 11:00 a.m..Participants will elect CountyCommanders and Vice Command-ers in the District for one-yearterms during the business meet-ing.Cattle producers are in the plan-ning phase for the upcoming graz-ing season. In order to successfullyplan for this season, they musttake an inventory of the forageavailable and be able to estimatethe grazing potential of pastures,says Kalyn Waters, SDSU Exten-sion Cow/Calf Field Specialist."Now is the time to start theplanning process. Having the righttools and knowledge to do so, willmake a world of difference. Attend-ing the drought management we-binars will put those tools in pro-ducers' hands," Waters said.In an effort to proactively aidcattle producers, SDSU ExtensionLivestock staff partnered withUniversity of Nebraska-LincolnExtension to host a five-part webi-nar series to help those raising cat-tle prepare for the possibility of thedrought continuing in 2013.The one-hour ManagingDrought Risk on the Ranch webi-nar series are being held the lastWednesday of each month, con-cluding in May. All sessions beginat 9 a.m. MST or 10 a.m. CST andare hosted at SDSU Extension Re-gional Centers.Each session will include cur-rent drought updates, forecasts
“Hair today gone tomorrow.” 
Bailey Hapney decided to try her hands at working with hair. She said it is a lot of work and if shedecides to become a stylist she will get her business degreefirst. Her plans are to attend WDT after graduation.
“Benefit Rodeo.” 
Mazee Pauley who loves to compete in therodeo world came up with an idea to have a benefit rodeo for Trey Elshere, Elsie Fortune and herself. The three competed atthe National High School Rodeo Finals so Pauley wanted tocome up with a way to help each other pay for expenses. She isundecided about what she will do after graduation but would liketo go to Texas and maybe have a career in nursing.
My senior project
Managing Drought Risk on the Ranch: Next meeting March 27
and presentations about specificinformation or tools. Followingeach webinar, SDSU ExtensionState and Field Specialists will beavailable for a question and an-swer session via video conference.They will also present additionalinformation relevant to SouthDakota producers.During the March 27th webinar,Pat Reece, former University of Nebraska-Lincoln Range Manage-ment Specialist, will discuss theCumulative Forage ReductionIndex. Reece is currently theowner of and a senior consultant atPrairie and Montane Enterprises.He has developed the CFR Indexin response to needs of ranchers hehas worked with to developdrought response plans. Reecepoints out that when animal num-bers need to be reduced because of drought, delayed marketing canhave substantial financial conse-quences, often costing typicalranches tens of thousands of dol-lars.Following Reece's presentation,South Dakota attendees will alsohave an opportunity to hear fromrancher, Bill Slovek of Philip.Slovek is a progressive rancherand current board member for theSouth Dakota Grassland Coali-tion. Slovek's ranch lies in thesouthwestern portion of the statein a region heavily impacted by thedrought. His perspective ondrought decision making, herdmanagement and hidden opportu-nities will allow other producersan opportunity to consider theirown options."UNL Extension and theDrought Mitigation Center havedone an outstanding job puttingtogether this program. They haveslated some of the best speakersavailable to provide critical infor-mation to producers. Our Januaryand February sessions proved thatthese are quality, applicable meet-ings that producers will gaingreatly from, and we had over 50attendees statewide at each," Wa-ters said.Topics each month will considerdrought planning information andtools available to producers. In ad-dition to University and Agencypresenters, a number of rancherswill also be featured, describingdevelopment and execution of their drought plans.These meetings are also in-tended to educate professionalsand consultants who work withranchers as a professional develop-ment series.The webinars are sponsored bythe National Drought MitigationCenter at the University of Ne-braska-Lincoln. The series was de-veloped with support from the Sus-tainable Agriculture Research andEducation (SARE) program, whichis funded by the U.S. Departmentof Agriculture - National Instituteof Food and Agriculture (USDA-NIFA).Scheduled dates and topics forthe series include:•March 27: The New Cumula-tive Forage Reduction (CFR)Index: Assessing Drought Impactsand Planning a Grazing Strategy;•April 24: Using a Drought Cal-culator to Assist Stocking Deci-sions; and•May 29: Economic Factors toWeigh in Making Decisions duringDrought.For more information pleasevisit www.igrow.org, contact thenearest SDSU Extension RegionalCenter, or call Kalyn Waters,SDSU Cow/Calf Field Specialist at605-842-1267 or Pete Bauman,SDSU Range Field Specialist at605-882-5140.
District 2 American Legion will holdmeeting in Hermosa March 24
The session will also featurePost reports regarding the pastyear’s unusual activities, Post Americanism reports, a member-ship turn-in, recognition of theDistrict 2 Legionnaire of the Yearand an address by State AmericanLegion Commander Byron Calliesof Watertown.District 2 Commander DennisEdwards of Rapid City will con-duct the Legion business sessionand the Hermosa Post #303 Com-mander Robert King will be incharge of local arrangements.The District 2 Auxiliary willhold its meeting at 1:00 p.m. thesame day at a location to be deter-mined.
Margaret Eisenbraun, with the help of her family and friends,saved a jar full of pop tabs. Margaret is shown with her jar at aMcDonalds in Rapid City, who in turn sends them to the RonaldMcDonald House.
~Courtesy Photo
Margaret Eisenbraun donatespop tabs to McDonalds
dollar.” Both education and Medi-caid providers, she said, have re-ceived one-time funds for the cur-rent fiscal year, as well as next.“Utilizing one-time funds,” saidPeters, “allows us to continue to beconservative with our ongoingspending with all the uncertaintiesthat lie ahead of our state, such asfederal budget cuts, healthcare re-form and an uncertain economy.”The Governor, said Peters, left$26.5 million in one-time funds inFT2013 on the bottom line and thechange in estimates provided an-other $5.1 million, for a total of $31.6 million.“We were able to invest thatmoney in K-12 education,providers, higher education, schol-arships and economic develop-ment,” saod Peters.The total general fund spendingfor FY2014, she said, will be$1,327,249,577, which will allowthe FY2014 budget to be balancedboth nominally and structurally.General fund spending was bro-ken down as education, 46 percent;taking care of people, 39 percent;protecting the public 10 percent,and all the rest of state govern-ment at only five percent.Major accomplishments, saidPeters, was the three percent in-flationary increase in state aid togeneral education, plus a one per-cent one-time increase in the cur-rent year for K-12 education. Post-secondary technical institutes re-ceived the same three percent in-flationary increase, plus one per-cent one-time increase.The Board of Regents received a$5.4 million increase to their basebudget, plus $3.7 million in one-time funding.Providers will receive a threepercent increase in their ongoingallocations with an additional onepercent one-time rate increase forthe remainder of this fiscal year.A three percent salary policywas given to state employees, plusa movement to job worth, said Pe-ters.“We were also able to fund $4.1million in ongoing general fundsand $3 million in one-time generalfunds,” she said, for the new PublicSafety Improvement Act.This will improve public safety,Peters said, “by investing in pro-grams, practices and policies thathave been proven to reduce recidi-vism, hold offenders more account-able by strengthening communitysupervision, and reduce correc-tions spending and focus prisonspace on violent, chronic, and ca-reer criminals.“This is a budget that is respon-sible and will continue to serve ourcitizens and our state for the com-ing year and positions our state forfuture growth.”The House adopted the bill witha 48-17 vote, and the Senateadopted it 31-4.
Legislature passes $4.1 billionbudget on final day of main run
continued from page 1
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Mnday Night Mixed
Dakota Bar................................28-16Shad’s Towing...........................26-18Handrahan Const.....................26-18Badland’s Auto..........................20-20Rockers......................................16-28Petersen’s..................................16-28
Hightlights:
Gail Reutter..........................216/495Joe Handrahan............................210Wendell Buxcel.............................200 Andrew Reckling.........224 clean/578Marlis Petersen.....................190/472Carl Brown.................3-10 split; 547Jackie Shull..................................186Tena Slovek........................178 cleanConnie Schlim..............................172 Vickie Petersen............................172Jerry Mooney...................6-7-10 split Venessa Buxcel...................5-10 split
Tesday Men’s Early
Philip Motor..............................26-10Peoples Market.........................25-11Kennedy Impl...........................21-15G&A Trenching.........................18-18George’s Welding......................16-20Bear Auto..................................15-21Philip Health Service...............14-22Kadoka Tree Service...................9-27
Highlights:
Tony Gould..........................233, 235,................................214 all clean/682Fred Foland.........244, 194 clean/597Cory Boyd..............................205/567Pat Berkimer................5-7 split; 516Todd Radway.........................209/515Earl Park....................3-10 split; 511Jim Larson............................200/510Eliel Poor Bear.............................510Ryan Seager.................................507Matt Schofield..............................503 Alvin Pearson.............3-10 split; 500Les Struble.........................3-10 splitNorm Buxcel.........................5-6 splitWendell Buxcel...................9-10 splitCurtis Bitting.....................3-10 splitBill Bainbridge.............3-10 split x 2Bill Stone..............................5-7 splitRonnie Williams...................5-7 split
 Wednesday Mrning Cffee
Invisibles.............................35.5-12.5State Farm..........................31.5-16.5Cutting Edge Salon..................30-18Bowling Belles....................22.5-25.5Jolly Ranchers....................15.5-32.5
Highlights:
Karen Foland................190, 183/494Charlene Kjerstad178, 157, 152/487Debbie Gartner.....................171/466Shirley Parsons.............153, 152/415Sandra O’Connor.....5-8-10 split; 169Joy Neville....................................158Deanna Fees............................3-5-10Kay Williams........................4-5 split
 Wednesday Night Early
Dakota Bar..................................32-8Morrison’s Haying....................25-15Hildebrand Concrete................20-20Chiefie’s Chicks...................18.5-21.5Wall Food Center......................17-23First National Bank.................16-24Dorothy’s Catering....................16-24Just Tammy’s......................15.5-24.5
Highlights:
Chelsea Moos.......................129, 125Lois Porch.....................................179Laniece Sawvell...........................400Stacey Schulz........................177/477 Amy Morrison.......................175/503 Val Schulz...............2-7 split x 2; 488Shar Moses...................................472Cristi Ferguson............................180Marlis Petersen............5-7 split; 175Tena Slovek..................................174
Thrsday Men’s
The Steakhouse..........................35-5Coyle’s SuperValu.....................30-10O’Connell Const........................22-18WEE BADD...............................18-22 A&M Laundry...........................16-24Dakota Bar................................16-24West River Pioneer Tanks........13-27McDonnell Farms.....................10-30
Highlights:
Ky Bowen..........2-10 split; 207 cleanHaven Hildebrand.......................200Ronnie Coyle.......................216 cleanJay McDonnell.............................215Jan Bielmaier........................207/571Harlan Moos........3-10 split; 202/562Cory Boyd.....................................213Nathan Kjerstad........5-10 split; 547Neal Petersen........................205/546Ronnie Williams.................5-10 splitWendell Buxcel...................5-10 splitTyler Hauk............................5-7 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Randy’s Spray Service..............34-10Cristi’s Crew.............................28-16Lee & the Ladies.......................25-19Roy’s Repair..............................24-20King Pins...................................17-27The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Kristin Schmidt...................126, 143Tanner Norman...3-10 split; 205/541Bart Guptill..................................205 Annette Hand...............................402Lee Neville....................5-6 split; 184Brian Pearson.......................222/601Brenda Grenz........................176/490 Alvin Pearson.............3-10 split; 202Duane Hand...............5-10 split; 537John Heltzel.4-7-9, 3-10 & 5-6 splitsKelly Fees.....................3-10 split x 2Theresa Miller....................5-10 split
 
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Pennington County Courant • March 21, 2013•
Page 3
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Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.Sun: 1:30 p.m.Mon: 7:00 p.m.
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 Visiting South Dakota’s Capitolbuilding is like going on a treasurehunt.People search for sky blue tilesin the terrazzo tile floors.Almost all the marble tiles inthe Capitol’s floors are yellow, rust,white, black, tan and green – al-most, because 66 of them are saidto be blue. The story goes that eachof the 66 Italian workers who laidthe floor during the Capitol’s 1905-1910 construction was given a bluestone to place anywhere in theCapitol as a “signature stone.”To date, 57 of the tiles have beenfound. It’s a story that causes visi-tors to the Capitol to look for thespecial tiles, and it might be justthat – a story. Interviews with menwho helped construct the buildingsay nothing about Italian crafts-men working on it, and peoplelooking at records say they canfind no evidence of the craftsmenhaving stayed in Pierre.The blue tiles are not the onlypoint of interest in the Capitol.The grand stairway leads fromthe second to the third floor. Manyof the people who tread where gov-ernors and legislators have trod donot notice that a baluster or spin-dle is upside down. They may be-lieve that workers accidentally putthe baluster in wrong, and did notnotice the mistake until it was toolate to correct the error. Not so, ac-cording to one researcher on theCapitol’s history. In The SouthDakota State Capitol: The FirstCentury, Marshall Damgaardwrites, “During the time that thisbuilding was constructed, artisanscommonly inverted a single balus-ter on a stairway in impressivebuildings to symbolize the belief that only God can attain perfec-tion. It is no coincidence that theinverted baluster is the third onedown on the right, symbolizing theHoly Trinity.”Incidentally, South Dakota’sstatehouse is not the only one withan inverted spindle. According toRichard R. Gibson’s A Celebrationof State Capitols, a lone spindle inthe Wyoming’s Capitol is upsidedown. The staircase was built by Amish craftsmen, who placed itupside down to remind all who
Legends of the Capitol
pass by it that no person or law isperfect.The stately columns inside theCapitol appear to be marble. Theywere constructed in scagliola.First, the columns were createdfrom plaster and covered by mar-ble dust, ink and yarn. Once themixture hardened, it was polishedto a lustrous sheen that resembledmarble. The resulting columnscost $100 each, whereas marblecolumns would have cost up to$1,000 each.Some of the Capitol’s stainedglass windows honor the first set-tlers in the state, according to Bar-bara Johnson of Aberdeen. She isa South Dakota Humanities Coun-cil scholar who has researched for
The photograph is of a stained glass window in the Capitol. The figures in the center of the paneare of special interest to stained glass scholar Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen, who believes themotif is of a water strider or straddlebug and honors the state’s first pioneers.
~Photo courtesy of South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives
the past five years the role stainedglass plays in buildings and howstained glass reflects culture andhistory.To Johnson, the fan-shapedstained glass panel in the back of the House chamber and thestained glass panel dedicated toGov. George S. Mickelson andseven other men who were killedin a plane crash have motifs thatresemble wingless water striders.Johnson contends that the waterstrider’s large eyes correspond totwo large circles in each motif,while the insect’s front, middle andhind legs match up with the swirlsin the motif.The water strider was called astraddlebug by pioneers who oftensaw it skittering across the surfaceof the state’s lakes and ponds. A straddlebug was also a threeboards set together in tripod formand used by homesteaders to showthat a claim was occupied.One more thing that those visit-ing the Capitol might not realize isthat the Capitol Hill area was the“Boot Hill” cemetery of early-dayPierre.During the final grading andlandscaping around the Capitol,workers unearthed a number of pine coffins. A worker recognizedone of the skeletons as belongingto Arkansaw, a desperado shot todeath by vigilantes at the foot of Pierre Street in Pierre in 1881.This moment in South Dakotahistory is provided by the SouthDakota Historical Society Founda-tion, the nonprofit fundraisingpartner of the South Dakota StateHistorical Society. Find us on theweb at www.sdhsf.org
By Libbi Sykra
With Easter quickly approach-ing, we feel that it is completelyappropriate to say, “Things arehopping here at the library!”There is so much going on hereright now! On Wednesday, March27 at 6:00 p.m., the book discus-sion group is meeting to talk about
The Perks of Being a Wallflower
byStephen Chbosky. Stop in to checkout this excellent novel. It is a title(and book discussion meeting) thatyou will not want to miss!Here at Wall Community Li-brary, we have some of the newesttitles available for your choosing!If you want to browse our newestadditions, check out the revolvingrack located near the audio books.Every month, the staff herepicks “books of the month.” Wehave a title selected for each agegroup: Youth, Juniors, Teens, and Adults. This month, the books are
I Want My Hat Back
by JonKlassen (youth),
Stick Man’s Re-ally Bad Day
by Steve Mockus (ju-nior),
The Perks of Being a Wall- flower
by Stephen Chbosky (teen),and
Me Talk Pretty One Day
byDavid Sedaris (adult).In addition to the books of themonth, seasonal selections are typ-ically available as well.We try to connect with the com-munity as much as possible atWall Community Library. In orderto accomplish this goal, we are cur-rently showcasing some beautifulartwork done by the Wall Elemen-tary School third grade class. Stopin to see pictures of beautifullydrawn buffaloes—it’s amazing tosee the beautiful artwork made bythese students! We will only havethem in the library for about twoweeks. After that, you can view
Breaking Standards“It’s Hopping Here”
them at USFS Buffalo Gap Na-tional Grasslands Visitor Center inWall (for two weeks). After that,you can view them at the BenReifel Visitor Center in BadlandsNational Park for two weeks. Wehope that you will be able to seethem!If you would like to check outour latest selections and see thebuffalo drawings, please contactour library by any of the followingmeans.We are open at 407 Main Streeton Wednesdays from 12-7 p.m.,Thursdays from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.and 1:30 p.m. - 5 p.m. and Fridaysfrom 8 a.m. - 1p.m.Feel free to call us at (605)-279-2929 or email us at wallcom-libgwtc.net. Don’t forget to like uson Facebook! Our name in thisvenue is Wall Community Library.We hope you hop on in to seewhat’s “hoppen”-ing in here!
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Applications are still availablefor the Christopher C. Lurz Memo-rial Scholarship.The family of Chris Lurz estab-lished this scholarship, in hismemory.The scholarship will be awardedto a current or past graduate of Wall High School who is or will beattending a vo-tech or trade school.
Christopher C. Lurzmemorial scholarship
Applications are still availablefor the Hayes Memorial Scholar-ship.This scholarship fund was estab-lished by Candice Hayes in mem-ory of her husband, John Hayes.The scholarship is awarded an-nually to a current or past gradu-ate of Wall High School pursuingadditional education in the field of One of the criteria establishedincludes a GPA of no less than a2.0 while in high school. Applications and additional in-formation may be obtained by con-tacting the counseling office atWall High School.The deadline for submitting ap-plications is April 1, 2013.
Hayes memorial scholarship
agriculture, either by attendanceat a vo-tech school, a college or uni-versity. Applications and additional in-formation may be obtained by con-tacting the counseling office atWall High School.The deadline for submitting ap-plications is April 1, 2013.The South Dakota Stockgrowers Association and the South DakotaCattlewomen are currently accept-ing applications for a $1,000 schol-arship in memory of Guy E. Ham.The scholarship is available toany South Dakota student havingcompleted at least one year of post-secondary education and pursuinga career in an agricultural or agri-business related field.This $1,000 scholarship is madepossible by the generosity and giftof the Guy E. Ham Beef IndustryScholarship in memory of GuyHam and his commitment to thefuture of the agriculture industryin South Dakota.
SD Stockgrowers, Cattlewomenoffer Beef Industry scholarship
Application information and de-tails can be found by visitingwww.southdakotastockgrowers.orgor by contacting the SD Stock-growers Assoc. at 605-342-0429. Applications will be accepteduntil August 1, 2013 and the schol-arship will be awarded during theStockgrowers Annual Conventionon September 28, 2013.
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