Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
13Activity
P. 1
Recognizing Hate Speech: Antisemitism on Facebook

Recognizing Hate Speech: Antisemitism on Facebook

Ratings: (0)|Views: 19,652 |Likes:
Published by Andre Oboler
Facebook pages can provide a home for racism and facilitate the creation of new virtual communities based on hate of specific minorities. Facebook pages can also serve as archives for hateful content that can be easily found, shared, and spread. Hate pages on Facebook pose a danger to the social cohesion of society and due to their low entry barrier, significantly facilitate the spread of racist content.

This report tracks the response by Facebook to a catalogue of antisemitic content over a period of time. The report highlights that there are ongoing problems with antisemitic content at Facebook. One problem is that Facebook appears unable or unwilling to recognize certain well known kinds of antisemitic content as hate speech. Another problem relates to a lack of quality control. This report clarified the issues and makes significant recommendations to Facebook of ways they can make more effectively implement their existing policy against hate speech.

Significant forms of antisemitism which Facebook appear unable to recognize as hate speech include the use of some propaganda very closely related to that used by the Nazis during the second world war, for example, the imagery of Jews as rats that need to be exterminated. Another example are Facebook pages promoting the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, and antisemitic forgery that has been used to justify pogroms and genocide. Complaints by users about the use the Nazi symbolism in relation to the State of Israel are also routinely dismissed by Facebook.

This report’s broad conclusion is that the standard reporting tools available to all Facebook users, and the review by front line staff in response to these reports, has a significant failure rate. New processes, including a review of complaints that are initially rejected, are needed in order to better respond to the problem of online antisemitism and online hate more generally. The report suggests a process of continual improvement be adopted by organisations like Facebook in their efforts to combat the proliferation of hate speech on their platforms.
Facebook pages can provide a home for racism and facilitate the creation of new virtual communities based on hate of specific minorities. Facebook pages can also serve as archives for hateful content that can be easily found, shared, and spread. Hate pages on Facebook pose a danger to the social cohesion of society and due to their low entry barrier, significantly facilitate the spread of racist content.

This report tracks the response by Facebook to a catalogue of antisemitic content over a period of time. The report highlights that there are ongoing problems with antisemitic content at Facebook. One problem is that Facebook appears unable or unwilling to recognize certain well known kinds of antisemitic content as hate speech. Another problem relates to a lack of quality control. This report clarified the issues and makes significant recommendations to Facebook of ways they can make more effectively implement their existing policy against hate speech.

Significant forms of antisemitism which Facebook appear unable to recognize as hate speech include the use of some propaganda very closely related to that used by the Nazis during the second world war, for example, the imagery of Jews as rats that need to be exterminated. Another example are Facebook pages promoting the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, and antisemitic forgery that has been used to justify pogroms and genocide. Complaints by users about the use the Nazi symbolism in relation to the State of Israel are also routinely dismissed by Facebook.

This report’s broad conclusion is that the standard reporting tools available to all Facebook users, and the review by front line staff in response to these reports, has a significant failure rate. New processes, including a review of complaints that are initially rejected, are needed in order to better respond to the problem of online antisemitism and online hate more generally. The report suggests a process of continual improvement be adopted by organisations like Facebook in their efforts to combat the proliferation of hate speech on their platforms.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Andre Oboler on Mar 21, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/29/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 Recognizing Hate Speech: Antisemitism on Facebook306 Hawthorn Road,Caulfield S. Vic. 3162T (61-3) 9272 5594E info@ohpi.org.au  W: www.ohpi.org.au  Report: IR13-1Dr Andre Oboler
 
Recognizing Hate Speech
Antisemitism on Facebook
Copyright ©2013 Online Hate Prevention Institute
 
Recognizing Hate Speech: Antisemitism on Facebook Page|
ii
By Andre Oboler, foreword by Peter Wertheim
Published in Melbourne by:Online Hate Prevention Institute306 Hawthorn Rd, Caulfield South, Vic, 3162Ph: (03) 9272 5594E-mail: ohpi@ohpi.org.auWebsite: http://www.ohpi.org.au
ISBN: 9780987429421National Library of AustraliaCataloguing-in-Publication entry is available from the National Library of Australia:http://catalogue.nla.gov.au/ Copyright ©2013 Online Hate Prevention Institute
 
Online Hate Prevention Institute Page|
i
About the Online Hate Prevention Institute
The Online Hate Prevention Institute (OHPI) is an Australian Charity on the Register of Harm PreventionCharities maintain by the Australian Government. We aim to be a world leader in combating online hateand a critical partner who works with key stakeholders to improve the prevention, mitigation andresponses to online hate. Ultimately, OHPI seeks to facilitate a change in online culture so that hate in all its
forms becomes as socially unacceptable online as it is in “real life”.
 OHPI is a charity that accepts public donations; within Australia donations over two dollars are taxdeductible. As a new organisation, established in 2012, we are still in the early process of building a supportbase and establishing relationships with grassroots supporters, major donors, foundations and grantmakers. More information about OHPI can be found on our website: www.ohpi.org.au and offers of  support are most welcome.
About the
Report’s
Author, Dr Andre Oboler
Dr Oboler is CEO of the Online Hate Prevention Institute and co-chair of the Online Antisemitism Working
Group of the Global Forum to Combat Antisemitism. Since coining the term ‘Antisemitism 2.0’ in 2008, his
work has stood at the leading edge of efforts to combat the rising problem of internet based antisemitismand online Holocaust denial, particularly in the area of social media. Dr Oboler holds a PhD in ComputerScience from Lancaster University (UK) and completed a Post Doctoral Fellowship in the Department of Political Science at Bar-Ilan University (Israel). He is a Senior Member of the IEEE and a member of the IEEEComputer Society and the IEEE Society for the Social Implications of Technology.
About the Foreword Author, Peter Wertheim
Currently the Executive Director of the Executive Council of Australian Jewry, Peter was a lawyer for 32years. His major clients included trade unions and other not-for-profit organisations, and he has also actedas honorary solicitor for a number of charities, including the Aboriginal Medical Service Co-operative Ltd,Redfern, Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of New South Wales, East Timor Relief AssociationInc., Australian International Fund for Disadvantaged Children in Vietnam Limited and numerous Jewishcommunity organisations. In July 2010, Peter was appointed by the Australian Government as a member of its Australian Multicultural Advisory Council and since 2011 has been a member of its successor body, theAustralian Multicultural Council. In that capa
city he participated in the Federal Government’s National Anti
-
Racism Partnership which in 2012 produced Australia’s National Anti
-Racism Strategy. Peter is also aStatutory Board Member of the NSW Anti Discrimination Board, a New South Wales State governmentbody.
Limited License to Reproduce this Report
If you find this report useful, and wish to share it with other, please do so in line with the licensearrangements described below. Please also consider supporting OHPI, work like this is only possible withpublic support.This report has been released under
.This means you are welcome to upload copies of this report to other sites, or to make hard copiesof the report, provided the report is reproduced in full and your use is not for a commercial purpose.If you would like to reproduce part of the report in isolation, for example in briefing papers or studymaterial freely provided to students, please contact OHPI or Dr Andre Oboler and provide details of whichsections you would like and for what purpose.If you would like to reproduce some or all of this report commercially, for example as part of a set of material that will be sold, please contact OHPI or Dr Andre Oboler.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->