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Forward Together: An Action Agenda for America's Economic Recovery

Forward Together: An Action Agenda for America's Economic Recovery

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Please read and then join the growing number of leaders from across America who are signing their names to this special declaration for Americans to “come together in this time of national crisis to renew our commitment to serve as partners in public service in addressing the challenges our nation faces.”

View more reports at www.councilofnonprofits.org/stimulus
Please read and then join the growing number of leaders from across America who are signing their names to this special declaration for Americans to “come together in this time of national crisis to renew our commitment to serve as partners in public service in addressing the challenges our nation faces.”

View more reports at www.councilofnonprofits.org/stimulus

More info:

Published by: National Council of Nonprofits on Mar 12, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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01/09/2012

pdf

 
 
Economic Stimulus & Recovery
 
Special Report, Number 6
March 11, 2009
 
Forward Together 
: An Action Agenda for America's Economic Recovery
Historically
 
our
 
nation’s
 
greatest
 
asset
 
has
 
 been
 
its
 
people.
 
From
 
 before
 
the
 
Revolutionary
 
War
 
through
 
today,
 
the
 
American
 
people
 
have
 
gathered
 
through
 
nonprofit
 
groups
 
to
 
solve
 
common
 
problems.
 
Americans
 
came
 
together
 
through
 
abolitionist
 
societies
 
to
 
defeat
 
slavery,
 
suffrage
 
associations
 
to
 
secure
 
the
 
right
 
to
 
vote
 
for
 
women,
 
and
 
civil
 
rights
 
groups
 
to
 
obtain
 
equal
 
rights.
 
The
 
nonprofit
 
sector
 
 
along
 
with
 
the
 
 business
 
and
 
government
 
sectors
 
 
is
 
a
 
required
 
third
 
leg
 
of
 
the
 
stool
 
on
 
which
 
American
 
communities
 
depend.
 
Yet
 
in
 
recent
 
years,
 
the
 
nonprofit
 
sector
 
has
 
 been
 
ignored,
 
overlooked,
 
and
 
taken
 
for
 
granted.
 
This
 
unhealthy
 
disregard
 
of
 
the
 
nonprofit
 
sector’s
 
overall
 
value
 
and
 
its
 
specific
 
abilities
 
to
 
help
 
our
 
nation
 
in
 
this
 
time
 
of
 
great
 
need
 
prompted
 
some
 
concerned
 
Americans
 
to
 
craft
 
a
 
special
 
declaration.
 
Unlike
 
the
 
Declaration
 
of
 
Independence
 
that
 
proclaimed
 
the
 
need
 
for
 
dividing,
 
this
 
Declaration
 
emphasizes
 
interdependence
 
and
 
our
 
need
 
for
 
uniting.
 
Styled
 
as
 
an
 
action
 
document,
 
the
 
Declaration
 
offers
 
concrete
 
ways
 
nonprofits
 
can
 
help
 
America’s
 
economic
 
recovery
 
and
 
calls
 
for
 
a
 
reinvigorated
 
partnership
 
 between
 
the
 
government
 
and
 
nonprofit
 
sectors
 
to
 
address
 
our
 
country’s
 
economic
 
challenges
 
and
 
improve
 
the
 
quality
 
of
 
community
 
life.
 
The
 
Declaration
 
also
 
serves
 
as
 
an
 
awakening
 
document,
 
encouraging
 
individuals
 
in
 
nonprofits
 
to
 
declare
 
to
 
ourselves,
 
the
 
general
 
public,
 
and
 
our
 
natural
 
partners
 
in
 
local,
 
state,
 
and
 
federal
 
governments
 
that
 
the
 
nonprofit
 
sector
 
adds
 
value,
 
contributes
 
enormously,
 
and
 
won’t
 
 be
 
ignored
 
anymore.
 
This
 
document
 
presents
 
a
 
significant
 
opportunity
 
for
 
our
 
sector
 
to
 
step
 
forward
 
collectively
 
to
 
reclaim
 
our
 
proper
 
space.
 
Nonprofit
 
leaders
 
from
 
Hawaii
 
to
 
Maine
 
are
 
among
 
the
 
initial
 
local,
 
state,
 
and
 
national
 
nonprofit
 
leaders
 
who
 
already
 
have
 
signed
 
this
 
Declaration
 
that
 
calls
 
for
 
ensuring
 
that
 
the
 
nonprofit
 
sector
 
is
 
no
 
longer
 
overlooked
 
as
 
a
 
crucial
 
partner
 
in
 
solving
 
the
 
country’s
 
deepening
 
problems.
 
Please
 
 join
 
us.
 
Sign the Declaration Today
1.
 
Learn
.
Read
 
the
 
Declaration,
 
which
 
is
 
attached
 
to
 
this
 
Special
 
Report.
 
2.
 
Sign
.
To
 
sign
 
your
 
name
 
to
 
the
 
Declaration,
 
go
 
to
 
the
 
website
 
created
 
 by
 
the
 
 Johns
 
Hopkins
 
Listening
 
Post
 
Project
 
(which
 
organized
 
the
 
retreat
 
where
 
the
 
Declaration
 
was
 
conceived)
 
 
 
By
 
signing,
 
you
 
add
 
your
 
name
 
to
 
this
 
list
 
as
 
an
 
individual;
 
organizational
 
names
 
are
 
listed
 
for
 
identification
 
purposes
 
only.
 
3.
 
Spread the word
.
Please
 
encourage
 
others
 
 
your
 
friends,
 
office
 
colleagues,
 
 board
 
members,
 
volunteers,
 
and
 
others
 
who
 
care
 
about
 
the
 
nonprofit
 
sector
 
 
to
 
sign
 
as
 
well,
 
 by
 
spreading
 
news
 
about
 
the
 
Declaration.
 
4.
 
Join the dialogue.
 
 
© 2009 National Council of Nonprofits 202.962.0322 www.councilofnonprofits.org
 
 1
 
Forward Together
Empowering America’s Citizen Sector for the Change We Need 
 A
 
Call
 
to
 
 Action.
 
As
 
concerned
 
leaders
 
in
 
the
 
nonprofit,
 
or
 
citizen,
 
sector,
 
we
 
have
 
come
 
together
 
in
 
this
 
time
 
of
 
national
 
crisis
 
to
 
renew
 
our
 
commitment
 
to
 
serve
 
as
 
partners
 
in
 
public
 
service
 
in
 
addressing
 
the
 
challenges
 
our
 
nation
 
faces.
 
We
 
invite
 
our
 
colleagues
 
in
 
the
 
nonprofit
 
sector,
 
in
 
organized
 
philanthropy,
 
in
 
government,
 
in
 
the
 
 business
 
world,
 
and
 
in
 
academia,
 
to
 
 join
 
us
 
in
 
this
 
effort
 
so
 
that
 
together
 
we
 
can
 
use
 
the
 
present
 
crisis
 
as
 
an
 
occasion
 
to
 
rededicate
 
our
 
nation
 
to
 
the
 
principles
 
of
 
 joint
 
responsibility
 
and
 
concerted
 
action
 
that
 
have
 
long
 
 been
 
the
 
source
 
of
 
our
 
strength.
 
Why
 
Now?
 
We
 
issue
 
this
 
call
 
now
 
 because
 
of
 
the
 
magnitude
 
of
 
the
 
problems
 
that
 
confront
 
us,
 
 but
 
also
 
 because
 
of
 
the
 
opportunity
 
the
 
present
 
moment
 
offers
 
to
 
address
 
them.
 
The
 
problems
 
extend
 
 beyond
 
a
 
collapsing
 
economy
 
to
 
include
 
persistent
 
poverty,
 
disappearing
 
 jobs,
 
strained
 
families,
 
failing
 
schools,
 
continuing
 
environmental
 
degradation,
 
under
performing
 
and
 
overly
 
costly
 
health
 
care,
 
collapsing
 
infrastructure,
 
and
 
many
 
more.
 
Citizen
 
Sector 
 
Capabilities.
 
Serious
 
though
 
these
 
problems
 
are,
 
however,
 
we
 
also
 
feel
 
confident
 
about
 
our
 
nation’s
 
ability
 
to
 
solve
 
them
 
if
 
we
 
act
 
together.
 
This
 
confidence
 
arises
 
in
 
important
 
part
 
from
 
our
 
knowledge
 
of
 
the
 
strength,
 
commitment,
 
and
 
resilience
 
of
 
our
 
nation’s
 
“citizen
 
sector,”
 
our
 
private,
 
nonprofit
 
organizations.
 
From
 
earliest
 
time,
 
these
 
institutions
 
have
 
functioned
 
as
 
agents
 
of
 
change,
 
incubators
 
of
 
innovation,
 
and
 
crucibles
 
for
 
some
 
of
 
our
 
 boldest
 
experiments
 
and
 
highest
 
ideals.
 
Today
 
as
 
well
 
they
 
function
 
as
 
partners
 
in
 
public
 
service
 
sheltering
 
the
 
homeless,
 
training
 
the
 
unemployed,
 
educating
 
our
 
youth,
 
 building
 
affordable
 
housing,
 
counseling
 
families,
 
delivering
 
health
 
care,
 
giving
 
voice
 
to
 
the
 
powerless,
 
enriching
 
our
 
lives
 
with
 
arts
 
and
 
culture,
 
and
 
serving
 
uniquely
 
as
 
vehicles
 
for
 
citizen
 
initiative
 
in
 
support
 
of
 
the
 
common
 
good.
 
In
 
the
 
process,
 
they
 
contribute
 
powerfully
 
to
 
our
 
economy,
 
employing
 
11
 
million
 
paid
 
workers
‐‐
more
 
than
 
the
 
construction
 
industry
 
(7.2
 
million),
 
finance
 
(5.2
 
million),
 
transportation
 
(5.1
 
million),
 
real
 
estate
 
(2.1
 
million),
 
and,
 
with
 
volunteers,
 
more
 
than
 
all
 
 branches
 
of
 
manufacturing
 
(14.4
 
million).
 
The
 
Need.
 
But
 
America’s
 
citizen
 
sector
 
can
 
no
 
more
 
solve
 
the
 
country’s
 
problems
 
on
 
its
 
own
 
than
 
can
 
government
 
or
 
 business.
 
Realizing
 
this,
 
our
 
country
 
has
 
forged
 
elaborate
 
partnerships
 
 between
 
government
 
and
 
the
 
citizen
 
sector
 
in
 
almost
 
every
 
policy
 
sphere.
 
But
 
these
 
partnerships
 
were
 
cobbled
 
together
 
in
 
ad
 
hoc
 
fashion
 
and
 
are
 
far
 
from
 
achieving
 
their
 
potential.
 
What
 
is
 
more,
 
our
 
nonprofit
 
organizations
 
face
 
a
 
variety
 
of
 
other
 
fiscal
 
and
 
operational
 
strains.
 
In
 
this
 
time
 
of
 
testing
 
for
 
our
 
nation,
 
when
 
America
 
needs
 
its
 
citizen
 
sector
 
more
 
urgently
 
than
 
ever,
 
we
 
 believe
 
it
 
is
 
time
 
to
 
renew
 
and
 
reinforce
 
America’s
 
compact
 
with
 
this
 
crucial
 
set
 
of
 
institutions.
 
This
 
renewal
 
 process
 
will
 
involve
 
work
 
 for 
 
all
 
of 
 
us:
 
For
 
citizens
 ,
 
it
 
will
 
require
 
greater
 
commitment
 
to
 
service
 
and
 
community,
 
to
 
giving
 
and
 
volunteering;
 
For
 
government
 
at
 
all
 
levels
 ,
 
it
 
will
 
require
 
flexibility
 
and
 
new
 
approaches,
 
investment
 
in
 
nonprofit
 
capacity,
 
a
 
nonprofit
 
seat
 
at
 
the
 
policy
 
table,
 
heightened
 
responsiveness
 
to
 
citizen
sector
 
innovations,
 
and
 
greater
 
protection
 
of
 
the
 
distinctive
 
functions
 
such
 
as
 
advocacy
 
that
 
make
 
the
 
citizen
 
sector
 
so
 
vital;
 
For
 
business
 ,
 
it
 
will
 
require
 
strengthened
 
partnerships
 
with
 
citizen
 
sector
 
organizations
 
and
 
continued
 
integration
 
of
 
socially
 
responsible
 
objectives
 
into
 
central
 
 business
 
operations;
 
For
 
organized
 
philanthropy
 ,
 
it
 
will
 
require
 
greater
 
commitment
 
to
 
leveraging,
 
as
 
opposed
 
to
 
preserving,
 
assets,
 
to
 
fostering
 
innovation,
 
and
 
to
 
taking
 
risks;
 
 
 2
For
 
nonprofit
 
leaders
 
and
 
organizations,
 
it
 
will
 
require
 
effective
 
management,
 
continuous
 
innovation,
 
recommitment
 
to
 
mission,
 
 broadened
 
engagement
 
of
 
citizens,
 
and
 
attention
 
to
 
measurable
 
results;
 
and
 
For
 
everyone
 ,
 
it
 
will
 
require
 
a
 
recognition
 
that
 
no
 
one
 
set
 
of
 
institutions
 
has
 
all
 
of
 
the
 
answers
 
or
 
all
 
of
 
the
 
resources
 
needed
 
to
 
address
 
the
 
problems
 
we
 
face,
 
and
 
that
 
cooperative
 
action
 
 by
 
all
 
of
 
our
 
institutions—government,
 
 business,
 
and
 
nonprofit—holds
 
the
 
real
 
key
 
to
 
the
 
progress
 
we
 
need.
 
Time
 
to
 
 Act 
.
 
The
 
time
 
for
 
action
 
is
 
now
 
and
 
we
 
call
 
on
 
our
 
fellow
 
citizens,
 
and
 
our
 
partners
 
in
 
public
 
service,
 
to
 
respond.
 
The
 
Action
 
Agenda
 
that
 
follows
 
identifies
 
some
 
of
 
the
 
concrete
 
steps
 
we
 
feel
 
are
 
needed.
 
Forward Together
:
 
The
 
 Action
 
 Agenda
 
To
 
improve
 
our
 
nation’s
 
ability
 
to
 
address
 
the
 
serious
 
challenges
 
our
 
country
 
faces,
 
America
 
needs
 
to
 
take
 
fuller
 
advantage
 
of
 
the
 
important
 
asset
 
represented
 
 by
 
its
 
“citizen
 
sector,”
 
our
 
country’s
 
vast
 
network
 
of
 
private,
 
nonprofit
 
organizations.
 
Two
 
sets
 
of
 
actions
 
in
 
particular
 
are
 
especially
 
needed:
 
first,
 
a
 
set
 
of
 
immediate
 
actions
 
designed
 
to
 
equip
 
the
 
citizen
 
sector
 
to
 
engage
 
fully
 
in
 
America’s
 
economic
 
recovery;
 
and
 
second,
 
a
 
 broader
 
set
 
of
 
actions
 
designed
 
to
 
enable
 
the
 
citizen
 
sector
 
to
 
function
 
more
 
effectively
 
as
 
a
 
partner
 
in
 
public
 
service
 
in
 
addressing
 
our
 
country’s
 
enduring
 
problems.
 
I.
 
The
 
Immediate
 
 Agenda
 
Equip
 
the
 
Citizen
 
Sector
 
to
 
Engage
 
Fully
 
in
 
America’s
 
Economic
 
Recovery
 
 America’s
 
nonprofit
 
organizations
 
have
 
a
 
crucial
 
role
 
to
 
 play
 
in
 
the
 
immediate
 
effort
 
to
 
help
 
with
 
our
 
nation’s
 
economic
 
recovery.
 
In
 
 fact,
 
as
 
the
 
Katrina
 
recovery
 
has
 
shown,
 
the
 
road
 
to
 
recovery
 
will
 
ultimately
 
 pass
 
directly
 
through
 
them.
 
To
 
help
 
them
 
with
 
this
 
task,
 
steps
 
such
 
as
 
these
 
should
 
be
 
considered
:
 
1)
 
Take
 
advantage
 
of 
 
existing 
 
mechanisms
 
(such
 
as
 
the
 
Emergency
 
 Food
 
and
 
Shelter 
 
Program)
 
to
 
channel
 
significantly
 
expanded
 
assistance
 
to
 
 families
 
in
 
need
 
through
 
the
 
existing 
 
network
 
of 
 
nonprofit 
 
organizations
 
offering 
 
 food,
 
clothing,
 
and
 
housing.
 
To
 
encourage
 
citizen
 
involvement
 
in
 
dealing
 
with
 
this
 
crisis,
 
any
 
matching
 
requirement
 
attached
 
to
 
any
 
of
 
the
 
existing
 
mechanisms
 
used
 
to
 
convey
 
these
 
funds
 
could
 
 be
 
met
 
 by
 
mobilizing
 
volunteers
 
as
 
well
 
as
 
money.
 
2)
 
Enlist 
 
 America’s
 
sizable
 
network
 
of 
 
nonprofit 
 
housing,
 
community
 
development 
 
 finance,
 
and
 
related
 
organizations
 
to
 
help
 
solve
 
the
 
mortgage
 
crisis
 
by
 
re
working 
 
 problem
 
loans.
 
These
 
organizations
 
already
 
manage
 
 billions
 
of
 
dollars
 
of
 
mortgage
 
loans
 
in
 
low
income
 
areas
 
with
 
delinquency
 
rates
 
far
 
 below
 
those
 
in
 
the
 
general
 
sub
prime
 
market.
 
3)
 
 Make
 
“build
ready” 
 
nonprofit 
 
 facilities
 
 for 
 
youth,
 
the
 
homeless,
 
the
 
aged,
 
and
 
community
 
betterment 
 
through
 
arts
 
and
 
education
 
eligible
 
 for 
 
stimulus
 
infrastructure
 
investments.
 
This
 
would
 
not
 
only
 
create
 
 jobs
 
 but
 
produce
 
needed
 
community
 
assets
 
that
 
could
 
 be
 
used
 
productively
 
for
 
decades.
 
4)
 
Rally
 
 giving 
 
and
 
volunteering 
 
 for 
 
recovery
 
assistance.
 
Tax
 
and
 
other
 
changes
 
over
 
the
 
past
 
eight
 
years
 
have
 
steadily
 
undermined
 
the
 
incentives
 
to
 
give
 
and
 
volunteer.
 
To
 
help
 
mobilize
 
private
 
resources
 
for
 
recovery
 
assistance,
 
steps
 
such
 
as
 
these
 
should
 
 be
 
considered:
 
expand
 
support
 
for
 
AmeriCorps
 
and
 
related
 
service
 
programs,
 
allow
 
non
itemizers
 
to
 
deduct
 
their
 
charitable
 
contributions,
 
incentivize
 
foundations
 
to
 
exceed
 
their
 
required
 
5
 
percent
 
payout
 
rate
 
to
 
support
 
recovery
 
relief;
 
and
 
further
 
extend
 
provisions
 
to
 
allow
 
retirees
 
to
 
make
 
tax
exempt
 
IRA
 
withdrawals
 
for
 
charitable
 
contributions.
 

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