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She Hath Done What She Could.

She Hath Done What She Could.

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Published by glennpease
BY THE HON. AND REV. FRANCIS E. C. BYNG, M.A.,

CHAPLAIN IN ORDINARY TO THE QUEEN

AND TO THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS.



St. Mark xiv. 8. — “She hath done what she could: she is come
aforehand to anoint My body to the burying.
BY THE HON. AND REV. FRANCIS E. C. BYNG, M.A.,

CHAPLAIN IN ORDINARY TO THE QUEEN

AND TO THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS.



St. Mark xiv. 8. — “She hath done what she could: she is come
aforehand to anoint My body to the burying.

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Published by: glennpease on Mar 23, 2013
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SHE HATH DONE WHAT SHE COULD.WALTER FARQUHAR HOOK, D,D.CHAPLAIN IN ORDINARY TO HER MAJESTYMARK XIV. 8. " She hath done what she could."THE Christian life is compared to a journeywhich is to be taken by a narrow way to a straightgate. "Straight is the gate and narrow is theway which leadeth unto life, and few there bethat find it 1 ." Straight indeed has that gate been,to effect a passage through which, for Adam'spolluted 2 race, that stupendous miracle of mercywas needful 3 , the Incarnation, Sufferings, andDeath of the Everlasting SON of God 4 ! Butalthough a passage be now possible to the adoptedchildren of Goo 5 , through the straight gate, thei St. Matt.vii. 14. 2 Rom. v. 12. * Psalm xlix. 79 ; Acts, xvii. 3.* Rom. v. 21 ; vii. 18 ; Art ix. Ephes. ii. 1318.B2 SHE HATH DONE [SERM.lintel of which has been sprinkled with the bloodof the immaculate Lamb 1 , still we have each of us,like our Master, to take up our cross 2 ; nor canwe reach the gate, which Faith will open to us 3 ,until we have toiled and travelled along thenarrow path 4 . And they who thus toil andtravel, who desire to tread in their DivineMaster's steps, find the task the more difficultsince on either side of the narrow way aprecipice seems to yawn upon them ; since on
 
either side there are difficulty and danger, perhapsdestruction.Our journey is the more painful, because, toprevent a fall, we have constantly to preserve anequipoise. We have now to sway ourselves on thisside, then on that, in order to avoid falling either onthe one side or on the other. The gate is before us ;to reach it we are to walk in a given line ; to keepin that line, we have continually to be balancingthis principle against that ; not allowing any oneprinciple, however important, so to oversway usas to hurry us into forgetfulness of any otherprinciple ; but, even though we may not ourselvesperceive their consistency, trying to adhere tothem both when both are enjoined. For example,1 Cf. Exod. xii. 23 ; 1 Cor. v. 7; Heb. ix. 14. 2 St. Luke, ix. 23.3 1 John, v. 5. Acts, xiv. 22.I.] WHAT SHE COULD. 3we must ever remember our own responsibilityas being, in many respects, free agents 1 , and yetwe must not forget GOD'S predestination 2 towhatever it relates ; we must act earnestly andlabour diligently, as if all our success in all thatwe undertake depended upon ourselves 3 , and yetwe are to trace every event to the special, ever-interfering Providence of Goo 4 : we are to hearkento St. Paul when he tells us that we are justifiedby faith only 5 , but we are to listen likewise to St.James, on the other side, when he tells us that weare justified by works also* 5 ; we are to submit toself-denials, austerities, and mortifications, as if theformation of our moral character rested on self-discipline; and we are to have as regular andearnest and constant recourse to the means of grace,as if every thing depended upon grace. Weare to look, for justification, to faith only as the
 
inward instrument 7 , and yet we are to haverecourse to the Sacraments also as the outwardmeans 8 : not trusting to faith without the Sacraments, nor to the Sacraments without faith, nor to1 Deut. xxx. 19 ; Eccl. ix. 10, 11. * Eph. iii. 911.Eccles. ix. 10 ; Phil. ii. 12 ; Col. i. 29 ; iii. 23.* St. Matthew, vi. 26, 30 ; St. Luke, xii. 6, 7, 24 ; 1 Samuel ii. 6, 7; Job,v. 18, and xii. 23 ; Isaiah, xlv. 7 ; 2 Sam. xvi. 5, 10, 11.$ Rom. ii. 26 ; Gal. ii. 16. e St. James, iL 24. 7 Acts, xvi. 31.St. Mark, xvi. 16; 1 Peter, iii. 21 ; Titus, iii. 5, 6 ; St. John, vi,5354 ; Acts, ii. 42 ; 1 Cor. x. 16, 17 ; xi. 2326.B24 SHE HATH DONE [SERM.either without repentance ; nor to any or all of these except as means of uniting us still moreclosely to CHRIST the SAVIOUR.These doctrines and duties sometimes appear tostand in opposition to one another, and the mindis so desirous to have them reconciled, that to meetthat desire speculative men have formed a varietyof systems. This is the origin of theologicalschools and sects, and this it is that binds mentogether in schools and sects : the school or sectto which a man belongs being that which affordsto his mind the easiest solution to the difficultieswhich arise from the opposing nature of some of our duties. It were much to be wished thatmen would always remember that these systems,invented to make religion more intelligible thanGOD has made it in the Holy Scriptures, aremerely human inventions, and that there is

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