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Kenya - Mapping Digital Media

Kenya - Mapping Digital Media

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Published by OSFJournalism
The new constitution of Kenya, promulgated in August 2010, is considered a major positive development in ensuring the free flow of information. It provides for freedom of media as a right and fundamental freedom. Section 34 guarantees the independence of electronic, print, and all other types of media. The government has also pledged to enhance Kenya’s technological infrastructure by investing in the roll-out of fiber optic cable throughout the country and working on “digital villages” to enable people in remote parts of the country to access broadband internet. Stiff competition in the mobile phone market has also lowered access costs and there is a significant increase in news diversity as a direct result of the convergence of internet, television, and radio on mobile platforms.

In online journalism, the virtues associated with ethics—accuracy, honesty, truth, impartiality, fairness, balance, respect for autonomy of ordinary people—are barely respected, largely because there is no effective way of policing this, and there are no legal penalties. Concentration of ownership has increased in the last five years and transparency in ownership of media has improved only slightly over the past five years. The government controls media licensing—a process that is shrouded in secrecy, so that it is difficult to establish who owns which media house.

The overall framework of policy and law is not yet adequate for digitized media in Kenya. The national ICT policy of 2006 committed the government to support and encourage pluralism and diversity. While this led to a proliferation of channels, it did not do much for content diversity due to the level of concentration of media. A lack of resources to build the digital infrastructure, consumer ignorance of what the switch means and whether the public can afford the end-user devices are some of the challenges faced in Kenya’s digital switchover.
The new constitution of Kenya, promulgated in August 2010, is considered a major positive development in ensuring the free flow of information. It provides for freedom of media as a right and fundamental freedom. Section 34 guarantees the independence of electronic, print, and all other types of media. The government has also pledged to enhance Kenya’s technological infrastructure by investing in the roll-out of fiber optic cable throughout the country and working on “digital villages” to enable people in remote parts of the country to access broadband internet. Stiff competition in the mobile phone market has also lowered access costs and there is a significant increase in news diversity as a direct result of the convergence of internet, television, and radio on mobile platforms.

In online journalism, the virtues associated with ethics—accuracy, honesty, truth, impartiality, fairness, balance, respect for autonomy of ordinary people—are barely respected, largely because there is no effective way of policing this, and there are no legal penalties. Concentration of ownership has increased in the last five years and transparency in ownership of media has improved only slightly over the past five years. The government controls media licensing—a process that is shrouded in secrecy, so that it is difficult to establish who owns which media house.

The overall framework of policy and law is not yet adequate for digitized media in Kenya. The national ICT policy of 2006 committed the government to support and encourage pluralism and diversity. While this led to a proliferation of channels, it did not do much for content diversity due to the level of concentration of media. A lack of resources to build the digital infrastructure, consumer ignorance of what the switch means and whether the public can afford the end-user devices are some of the challenges faced in Kenya’s digital switchover.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: OSFJournalism on Mar 25, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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03/25/2013

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KENYA
COUNTRY REPORT 
MAPPING DIGITAL MEDIA:
 
Mapping Digital Media:Kenya 
A REPORT BY THE OPEN SOCIETY FOUNDATIONS
WRITTEN BY
George Nyabuga (lead reporter)Nancy Booker (reporter)
EDITED BY
Marius Dragomir and Mark Thompson (Open Society Media Program editors)Aboubakr Jamaï (regional editor)
EDITORIAL COMMISSION
Yuen-Ying Chan, Christian S. Nissen, Dusˇan Reljic´, Russell Southwood,Michael Starks, Damian TambiniThe Editorial Commission is an advisory body. Its members are not responsiblefor the information or assessments contained in the Mapping Digital Media texts
OPEN SOCIETY MEDIA PROGRAM TEAM
Meijinder Kaur, program assistant; Morris Lipson, senior legal advisor;and Gordana Jankovic, director
OPEN SOCIETY INFORMATION PROGRAM TEAM
Vera Franz, senior program manager; Darius Cuplinskas, director
5 February 2013
 
MAPPING DIGITAL MEDIA KENYA2
Contents
Mapping Digital Media ..................................................................................................................... 4Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................... 6Context ............................................................................................................................................. 9Social Indicators ................................................................................................................................ 11Economic Indicators ......................................................................................................................... 131. Media Consumption: Te Digital Factor ................................................................................... 141.1 Digital ake-up ................................................................................................................. 141.2 Media Preferences ............................................................................................................. 171.3 News Providers ................................................................................................................. 191.4 Assessments ...................................................................................................................... 272. Digital Media and Public or State-administered Broadcasters .................................................... 292.1 Public Service and State Institutions ................................................................................. 292.2 Public Service Provision .................................................................................................... 332.3 Assessments ...................................................................................................................... 353. Digital Media and Society ......................................................................................................... 373.1 User-Generated Content (UGC) ...................................................................................... 373.2 Digital Activism ................................................................................................................ 403.3 Assessments ...................................................................................................................... 43

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