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Computer Hacker Information Available on the Internet

Computer Hacker Information Available on the Internet

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Published by John André
1996 report on "hacker information" available on the Internet by the Government Accountability Office (nee: General Accounting Office). a/k/a, that one time the federal government published red box instructions on the taxpayer dime.
1996 report on "hacker information" available on the Internet by the Government Accountability Office (nee: General Accounting Office). a/k/a, that one time the federal government published red box instructions on the taxpayer dime.

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Published by: John André on Mar 25, 2013
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03/25/2013

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United States General Accounting Office
GAO
Testimony
Before the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations,Committee on Governmental Affairs,U.S. Senate
For Hearing onWednesday, June 5, 1996
INFORMATION SECURITY Computer Hacker Information Available on theInternet
Statement for the Record of Jack L. Brock, Jr.,Director, Defense Information and Financial ManagementSystemsandKeith A. Rhodes, Technical Assistant Director,Office of the Chief Scientist, Accounting and Information Management Division
G O A 
years
 1921 - 1996
GAO/T-AIMD-96-108
 
 Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee:Thank you for the opportunity to again participate in the Subcommittee’scontinuing hearings on the security of our nation’s information systems. As you know, on May 22, 1996, the first day of the Subcommittee’shearings, we testified and released our report
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about the increasing riskscomputer hackers
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pose to computer systems and information at theDepartment of Defense. Our purpose today is to reiterate the importanceof computer security to Defense and other federal agencies, and to providean introduction to hacker techniques and information available on theInternet.
Computer Attacks Arean Increasing Threat
The Department of Defense, like the rest of government and the privatesector, relies on technology. The Department depends increasingly oncomputers linked together in a vast collection of networks, many of whichare connected to the worldwide Internet.
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The Internet providestremendous benefits; it can streamline business operations and put a vastarray of information at the fingertips of millions of users. Over the lastseveral years, we have seen a rush to connect to the Internet, and todaythere are over 40 million users worldwide.However, with these benefits come risks. Hackers have been exploitingsecurity weaknesses of systems connected to the Internet for years. Thenumber of people with access to the Internet, any one of which is a  potential hacker, coupled with the rapid growth and reliance oninterconnected computers, has made the cyberspace frontier a dangerous place. Hackers have more tools and techniques than ever before, and thenumber of attacks is growing every day. The need for secure informationsystems and networks has never been greater.The Department of Defense’s computer systems are being attacked everyday. Although the exact number of attacks cannot be readily determinedbecause only a small portion are actually detected and reported, Defense
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Information Security: Computer Attacks at Department of Defense Pose Increasing Risks(GAO/AIMD-96-84, May 22, 1996).
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The term hacker refers to unauthorized individuals who attempt to penetrate information systems;browse, steal, or modify data; deny access or service to others; or cause damage or harm in some other way.
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The Internet is a global network interconnecting thousands of dissimilar computer networks andmillions of computers worldwide. Over the past 20 years, its role has evolved from relatively obscureuse by scientists and researchers to a popular, user-friendly means of information exchange for millions of users.
GAO/T-AIMD-96-108Page 1

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