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cryptolog_64

cryptolog_64

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Published by John Ohno
NSA cryptolog
NSA cryptolog

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Published by: John Ohno on Mar 28, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/23/2014

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86-36
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86-36
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December
1981
EXERCISE
SUPPORT
(U)
••••.••••••••••.•...•..•.
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THE
1981
URSI
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1
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10
NSA-CROSTIC
NO.
36
(U)
••••••.••••••••..••.••••••
David
H.
Williams'.''.'..
..
14IN
PURSUIT
OF:
FASTER
HORSES,
YOUNGERWOMEN,
OLDER
WHISKEY,
ANDMOREMONEY
(U)
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~
~
TEXTA:
WHAT
ISIT?
WHERE
IS
IT
GOING?
(U)
..•...
~
~~!
PLATFORM:
HOW
DID
YOU
SAYTHAT
WORKS?
(U)
••••••
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IN
THE
NAME
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EFFICIENCY
(U)
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on
'10-'1.2-.20'1.2
pursuanttoE.O.
'135.26.
vl
DR
Case
#
54778
 
DOCID:
Publishld
by
Pl,
Techniques
and
Standards,
forthe
Personnel
of
Operations
VOL
VIII
No.12
PUBLISHER
DECEMBER
1981
EDITORIAL
(,oJj
It
is
sometimes
puzzling
wny
some
people
turn
out
to
begood
atthis
analysis
business,
while
others
who
areevidently
just
as
welleducatednever
seem
toget
the
knack
of
it.
I
have,
of
course,
some
theories
about
this
(or
I
wouldn't
have
brought
thesubject
up),
and1wonderwhatyou
thereadersthink
about
this.
BOARD
OF
EDITORS
Editor-in-chief······1
1<7119S)
----;::::==~
Production
...•..••••••.•
1
l3369S)
COllection················I
~I(B555s)
cryptanalysis
••••.•.•••••
1
~~902S)
CryptolinguistiCS
••••..
1
~5981S)
InformationScience.
I
[03034s)
Language
..••.••.......•.••••
1
1(~161s)
Machine
Support.
I
lt5084S)
Mathematics
..•.••..•
1~8~18s)
Puzzles
............•.
David
H.
Williams
(1103s)
Special
Research
......••.
Vera
R.
Filby
(T!1'\19s)
Traffic
Analysis
•.....•..••
Don
Taurone
(~$t3s)
For
individual
subscriptions
send
name
and
organizationaldesignator
tOr
CRYPTOLOG.
r33
69S
r
call
\\
To
submit
'articles
or
letters
via
PLATFORM,
address
to
cryptolg
at
bar1c05
(note:
no
'0'
in
'log')
One
notion
I
keep
comingback
to,
is
that
very
few
discoveriesare
ever
madebymeans
of
the
so-called
"scientific
method",and
that
it
is
only
when
onecomes
tothepoint
of
having
todescribethe
discovery
toothers
that
the
"scientific
method"
is
used,
as
an
orderly
way
of
laying
out
facts
and
their
connecting
argu
ments.
Over
theyears,
it
seems
to
me
that
the
great
bulk
of
the
genuine
analytic
discoveries
weremadebya
relatively
few
people.
Some
of
these
people,
perhapsmost,
were
not
really"scientific
method"
people.
If
they
hada"method"
there
was
often
a
faint
smell
of
magic
about
their
descriptionof
it.
Some-
times,they
would
describe
their
discovery
as
an
accident,
as
pure
serendipity.
1no
longer
believe
in
the
serendipity
explanation.
It
simply
doesn't
fit
the
cir-
cumstances.
The
accidents
should
have
hap
pened
to
a
larger
number
of
people,not
just
to
a
small
number
of
"serendipity-prone"
analysts.
I
think
it
has
to
do
with
the
way
these
people
looked
at
the
world,
the
way
they
perceivedevents
around
them.Basedupon
my
contact
with
a
few
of
them,I
believe
that
some
of
theseserendipity-prones
looked
at
the
world
around
them
in
terms
of
a
before,
an
after,
and
the
eventconnecting
them.Givena
certain
"before"
and
"after"that
were
.Il2i
the
same,
something
"happened"
at
the
connecting
event.
I
think
it
may
havebeen
this
way
of
looking
at
the
events
aroundthem,
that
drew
the
attention
of
these
serendipity
prones
tothe
sites
of
their
discoveries.
Something
did.
What
doyou
think?
P.L.
86-36
 
DO-e-ILl:4O
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86-36
!
Exercise
Support
(LJ)
b~
.....,.,r
xx
C8:J
N
SA!C5S,
in
accordance.with
USSID
4,
supports
U.S.
military
exercises
where
CXl'UNT
1s/
required.
V42
(CurrentAppIlcationsDivision)
--1'r(C""'=C"""'CV",Tj
-levies
perSQnnel
to
serve
as
SIGINT
Reporter/Analysts
f~r
the
exercises.
SinceJanuary,1981,A6/(TechnicalSupport)has
participated
in
the
program.'!heauthor
would
1
j
ke
to
eYD.[ess
his
appreciation
to
MichaelF.---.P1iefV42l,
for
his
ccmnentson
the
section
concerning
therecentexercise.Introductionto
]!:xercise
SIGINT
(U)
(U)
All
large
military
exercises
are
conductedon
the
basis
of
ascenario
depicting
-sane
imaginary
war
situation,
both
to
give
the
participants
experience
in
copingwith
situa
tions
not
encountered
in
peacetime
and
to
evaluatethe
capabilities
of
coornanders,
staffs,
troops,
systems,
and
equipnent
to
copewithsuch
situations.
(U)
Inthe
course
of
the
exercise,
partici
pants
are
givenpreplannedinformationaboutimaginaryevents
in
thescenario
-what
the
enemy
is
doing,what
casualtiesfriendly
forces
have
suffered,
et,c.-
and
are
expected
to
respond
to
these
"events"with
orders,
plans,
and
actions.
Exercise
controllers
then
assess
the
results
of
the
players'actions,
givethe
players
appropriatefeedbackthroughsimulated
intelligence
and
operational
reports,
and
devise
subseqUentproblems
forthe
players.
(U)
Because
players'
actions
areoften
unpredictable,the
course
of
eventscan
devi
ate
considerablyfrom
the
original
script.
Controllers
are
expected
to
be
able
to
handle
this
"free
play"
and
still
keep
to
thekeythemes
of
thescenario.
(U)
MaXimUIII
realism
is
sought,
butrealism
will
always
be
sacrificed
to
accomplish
exer
cise
objectives.
Forexample,
enemy
capabili
ties
are
adjusted
as
required
to
provide
thedesired
amount
of
challenge
to
the
players,
even
to
the
pointof
wild
implausibility
if
necessary.
Thewar
cannot
be
allowed
to
be
won
or
lost
prematurely~
desperate
battles
mustcontinue
right
up
to
the
end
of
the
exer
cise.
(U)
Chaos
and
confusion
are
unavoidable
features
of
real
warfare.'!hese
qualities
arealso
characteristicin
the
management
of
intricate
exercisescenarios.
'!heplannedbreakdowns
and
disruptions
designed
to
test
the
playersare
canpounded
by
unplannedbreak
downs
and
disruptionsinevitably
suffered
among
the
controllers
and
referees.
Dec81
*
CRYProIDG
*
Page1
./
EO
1.4.
(c)
P.L.
86-36
IWIBhl3VIASSHIIIIf8IWlNElhSSflhY

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