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FM 31-16 Counterguerrilla Operations, 1963

FM 31-16 Counterguerrilla Operations, 1963

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MHI
Coy
:-:FM
31-16
DEPARTMENT
OF
THE
ARMY
FIELD
MANUAL
COUNTERGUERRILLA
OPERATIONS
HEADQUARTERSDEPARTMENT F TE ARMY
HEADQUARTERS,
DEPARTMENT
OF
THE ARMY
FEBRUARY
1
963
AGO 7700A
WWW.SURVIVALEBOOKS.COM
 
FM
31-16
FIELD
MANUAL
I
HEADQUARTERS,
DEPARTMENT
OF
THE
ARMY
No.
31-16
WASHINGTON
25, D.C.,
19
February
1963
COUNTERGUERRILLA
OPERATIONS
Paragraphs Page
CHAPTER 1.
GENERAL_________________________________
1,
2
2
2.
THE
ENEMY
RESISTANCE
MOVEMENTSection
I.
Organization
of
the
resistance
movement--__--______------
__-- _------
---------
3-17
3II.
Guerrilla
force operations
___________________________…__…--…-------------.
18-33
9
CHAPTER
3.
GENERAL
CONSIDERATIONS
OF
COUNTERGUERRILLA OPERATIONS
Section I.
General ----------------------------------
________________________________
34-38
20
II.
Command
and
staff -----------------------_____------
39-41
22
III.
Conduct of operation
------------------------
______________________________
42-46
24
IV.
Use
of
airmobile forces ____________________________--
-----------------------.
47-52
31
V.
Use
of
airborne
forces
_____________…_____-----_____________________________-
53,
54
35
CHAPTER
4.
POLICE OPERATIONS
Section
I.
General
-------
________________________
55,56
37
II.
Population
control
_________._____________________……_______-
57-61
38
III.
Security
measures____
._____________-_________________________-------------..
62-67
43
CHAPTER
5.
COMBAT
OPERATIONS
Section
I.
General--_________________________________ _________________________________
68,
69
49
II. Harassment
of
the
guerrilla
force
______-_________…-____…_--------____________
70-77
49
III.
Offensive
operations
-__________-___
-------------------------
_______________
78-88
60
IV. Denial
of
sponsoring
power
support
_________________________________
-
89-91
71
CHAPTER
6.
COMBAT
UNITS,
COMBAT
SUPPORT UNITS,
AND
ORGANIZATION FOR
COMBAT
Section
I.
General
_______________---_______-
- ----
92-94
75
II.
Infantry
and
airborne brigade
__-_________-______..____________________------
95-96
76
III. Infantry
and
airborne
infantry
battalion __________-_________…_____-_----------
97-103
76
IV.
Armor and armored
cavalry units
______-___._____.__________________--______-
104, 105
84
V.
Army
aviation support
__________----------------------______________________
106, 107
86
VI.
Fire
support
__________-...
....
_____________________
108-110
88
VII. Intelligence support
…_________________________________…_____---------------
111-120
92
VIII.
Engineer support
______________________________…___________________________
121, 122
99
IX.
Other
combat
support_-__--_______-__-__--__-_
____________________________---
23-131
99
CHAPTER
7.
COMBAT
SERVICE
SUPPORT_-__-__.______-__-_________-
___-------------__
132-141
103
8.
TRAINING
___-_____-__---___--___---____________
_.
.....................--- 42-153
112
APPENDIX
REFERENCES
_____.----__-_-__--____-___.________________________________
_____-
_
117
INDEX
-________________-_--_-.--......................_____------------
-------
121
TAGO
7700A-Jan
1
WWW.SURVIVALEBOOKS.COM
 
CHAPTER 1GENERAL
1.
Purpose
and
Scope
fantry,
and
Mechanized
Infantry
Battalions;
a.
This
manual provides guidance
for
all
in-
and FM 7-11,
Rifle
Company,
Infantry;
Air
fantry and airborne
ommanders and
where
borne
Infantry,
and
Mechanized
Infantry;
and
antry
and
airborne
commanders
and,
whereapplicable, staffs of the
brigade, battalion,
and
is designed
to
discuss
only
those
areas
which
rifle
company when
they
have
the
primary
mis-
require
special
emphasis in
counterguerrilla
sion
of
conducting
counterguerrilla
operations.
This
guidance
also
applies to
mechanized
in-
e.
Counterguerrilla
warfare
is
a contest
of
fantry
and
armor
units
of
comparable
level
imagination, ingenuity,
and
improvisation
by
when
they
have
been
appropriately tailored
to
the
opposing commanders. Commanders
must
delete
the major
portion
of
their
mechanized
be
ever
alert
to
change or
adapt
their
tactics,vehicular
support.
Commanders and
staffs
must
techniques, and procedures
to
meet
the
specificbe
prepared
to
conduct
counterguerrilla
opera-
situation
at
hand.
Once
the routine operations
tions
on a
detached or semi-independent basis.
of
a
counterguerrilla
force
become
stereotyped,
b.
This manual
discusses
the
nature
of
guer-
surprise
(a
major
ingredient
of
success)
has
rilla
forces
and
the supporting
underground
been
lost.elements
and
civilian
auxiliary
of
resistance
f.
Users of
this
manual are
encouraged
to
movements;
and
the organization,
training,
tac-
submit
recommended
changes
or
comments totics,
and
techniques to
destroy
guerrilla
forces improve
the
manual.
Comments
should
be
in active
war
(active
or nonactive
nuclear or
keyed
to
the
specific
page,
paragraph,
and
line
nonnuclear) and
subliminal
war.
of
the
text
in
which
the
change
is
recommended.
c.
The
tactics prescribed herein are
developed
Reasons
should
be
provided
for
each
comment
for
existing
combat
units
which
may
be
tailored
to
ensure
understanding
and
complete
evalua-to
meet
the requirements
of
counterguerrilla
tion. Comments
should
be
forwarded directly
warfare.
These
tactics
maximize
the
use
of
to
the
Commandant,
United States Army
In-
Army aviation
for
lift,
reconnaissance, and
fire
fantry
Combat Developments
Agency,
Fort
support.
These
tactics
generally have
universal
Benning,
Ga.
application
for
this
type
of
warfare.
However,since
guerrilla warfare
is
normally
conducted
2.
Terms
on
the
most
difficult
terrain
in
an
area
of
opera-
a.
Civilian
Support.
The
comparatively un-,
tions, commanders
must
modify
these
tactics
organized
body
of
disaffected
civilians
which
to
fit
the
particular terrain
in
which
they are
provides continuous
support
to
the
more or-
operating.
For
example;
in
jungle
areas,
more
emphasis
must
be
placed
on
the
use of
foot
mo-
bility;
in
swamps and
inundated areas,
on
the
b.
Guerrilla Force.
The
armed
combatant
ele-
use
of
watercraft;
and
in
the desert,
on
the
use
ment
of a
resistance
movement organized
on a
of
vehicular
mobility.
military
or
paramilitary
basis.
d.
This
manual
is
an
adjunct
to
FM
31-15,
c.
Resistance
Movement.
An
organized effort
Operations
against
Irregular
Forces;
FM
7-30,
by some
portion
of
the
civil
population of
a
Infantry,
Airborne,
and
Mechanized
Division
country to
resist
the
legally established govern-
Brigades;
FM
7-20,
Infantry,
Airborne
In-
ment
or an
occupying power.2
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7700A
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