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Table Of Contents

Replacing Styrofoam Jesus
Jesus’ Favorite City
All Bait, No Switch
Unchristian Nation
Confession Booth
Breaking Formation
Pro-Life . . . Seriously
From Behind Church Walls
Notes
Index
P. 1
The Evangelicals You Don't Know: Introducing the Next Generation of Christians

The Evangelicals You Don't Know: Introducing the Next Generation of Christians

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Published by RowmanLittlefield
So you have a problem with evangelical Christians? Which ones?

These are the provocative questions Tom Krattenmaker poses to his fellow progressives in The Evangelicals You Don’t Know. He challenges stereotypes about evangelical Christians and introduces readers to a movement of “new evangelicals” who are bringing forth a non-partisan expression of evangelicalism and creating opportunities for alliances and partnerships to advance the common good. Krattenmaker argues that cultural fault lines no longer divide the religious from the secular, or the evangelicals from “everyone else.” Rather, the lines that matter now run between the fundamentalist culture warriors of both the left and right on one side, and, on the other, the good-doers of any faith, or none, who want to work together to solve our society’s problems and introduce a new civility and decency to our shared national life.

Krattenmaker is one of the best-informed non-evangelicals writing about evangelicalism in American public life. He offers interesting stories, intriguing character sketches, and incisive writing in his readable and engaging book. Recounting the findings and insights gleaned from his many years of engagement with evangelical America, he draws conclusions sure to surprise, challenge, and even inspire non-evangelicals who had written off this controversial and influential faith movement. The Evangelicals You Don’t Know offers a refreshing alternative to narratives that pay attention only to aspects of evangelicalism that are most distasteful and threatening to secular-progressives and liberal religionists — providing instead a hopeful introduction to promising new currents rising among theologically conservative Christians.

So you have a problem with evangelical Christians? Which ones?

These are the provocative questions Tom Krattenmaker poses to his fellow progressives in The Evangelicals You Don’t Know. He challenges stereotypes about evangelical Christians and introduces readers to a movement of “new evangelicals” who are bringing forth a non-partisan expression of evangelicalism and creating opportunities for alliances and partnerships to advance the common good. Krattenmaker argues that cultural fault lines no longer divide the religious from the secular, or the evangelicals from “everyone else.” Rather, the lines that matter now run between the fundamentalist culture warriors of both the left and right on one side, and, on the other, the good-doers of any faith, or none, who want to work together to solve our society’s problems and introduce a new civility and decency to our shared national life.

Krattenmaker is one of the best-informed non-evangelicals writing about evangelicalism in American public life. He offers interesting stories, intriguing character sketches, and incisive writing in his readable and engaging book. Recounting the findings and insights gleaned from his many years of engagement with evangelical America, he draws conclusions sure to surprise, challenge, and even inspire non-evangelicals who had written off this controversial and influential faith movement. The Evangelicals You Don’t Know offers a refreshing alternative to narratives that pay attention only to aspects of evangelicalism that are most distasteful and threatening to secular-progressives and liberal religionists — providing instead a hopeful introduction to promising new currents rising among theologically conservative Christians.

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Publish date: Apr 26, 2013
Added to Scribd: Mar 28, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781442215467
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Publishers Weekly reviewed this
A frequent USA Today contributor, Krattenmaker (Onward Christian Athletes) combines reporting and opinion in this analysis of new evangelical leaders and their efforts to engage the culture in a noncombative way. Krattenmaker, who is not an evangelical and describes himself as a secular progressive, says he is keenly interested in evangelicals who "defy the stereotype." He is convinced that people such as Kevin Palau, Gabe Lyons, Jonathan Merritt, and even Focus on the Family's new leader, Jim Daly, are moving away from confrontation on such issues as abortion and gay rights. He also suggests evangelicals may be distancing themselves from their unblinking support of capitalism and the Republican Party. And they are also doing good works, whether fighting sex-trafficking or adopting orphans. Krattenmaker calls this "goodwill-mongering" evangelism and salutes these efforts. He convincingly argues that liberals, and especially atheists, should drop their reflexive antipathy toward evangelicals and begin to engage them. The two camps may not agree, but the nation may be better served by a more understanding and respectful posture. While many of the evangelicals he writes about have written their own books, this volume may be more persuasive to left-leaning, secular readers. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

2013-04-08, Publishers Weekly
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