Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Tech Talk 3.28.13

The Tech Talk 3.28.13

Ratings: (0)|Views: 88|Likes:
The Tech Talk 3.28.13
The Tech Talk 3.28.13

More info:

Published by: PhillipMichaelLeblanc on Mar 28, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/28/2013

pdf

text

original

 
The student voice of Louisiana Tech University
TalkTech
March 28, 2013 www.thetechtalk.org 
T
he
Volume 87Number 18
PRSRT STDNON-PROFITORGANIZATIONUS POSTAGE
PAID
RUSTON, LAPERMIT NO 104RETURNSERVICEREQUESTED
DANIEL GETSINGER
Staff Reporter
New technology brings eas-ier ways o handling lie, or inthis case, handling belongings.Tech’s Student GovernmentAssociation has passed a newbill to get dollies to help studentswho live on campus and have tomove their personal items.Carlton Gray, a junior humanresource management major,said it would be a good idea tohelp these students by passingthe bill.“I thought about this bill ora while and I fnally got aroundto calling Dickie Craword (deano student lie),” Gray said. “Hewas all or my idea or gettingthe new dollies.”Gray said this is not the frsttime Tech has used dollies tohelp students move urnitureand appliances.“We had them beore, butthey were either broken or inbad condition so we decided toget a ew new ones,” Gray said.There will be multiple dol-lies provided by SGA so thatstudents will have an easier wayo moving in and out o theirdorms or apartments.“We are getting about 17 dol-lies, and they should be avail-able or use by the end o thequarter in time or their check-outs,” Gray said.Gray said he hopes the stu-dents will fnd good use or the
CODY SEXTON
Staff Reporter
Anyone who walked into the Tonk Saturday or Nepal Nite would have believed they stepped straight into thenation’s captol city o Kathmandu.Dressed in clothing native to theirhomeland, students o Tech’s Na-maste Nepal Association hosted theirseventh annual Nepal Nite with dinnerand entertainment rom the “Roo o the World.”Swaraj Khati, a senior computerscience major and president o theNNA, said every year’s theme or theevent is dierent and this year thetheme was “Ekyabadhata.”“It means solidarity and promotingunity in the diversity in Nepal,” KhatisaidOver the years, the InternationalStudent Ofce has grown to includemore than 700 members rom 69 di-erent countries.Two hundred fty o those studentsare rom Nepal, making Nepalese stu-dents the second largest internationalgroup o students at Tech.One o the NNA’s objectives is topromote a better understanding o Nepalese culture and heritage or thecommunity o Tech and Ruston. Thus,Nepal Nite was born.The night’s estivities included sev-eral perormances rom not only stu-dents rom Nepal, but other countriesas well.Students rom Vietnam, Chinaand the United States took part intraditional Nepalese dances like theNewari Folk dance.Elise Endel, a Tech graduate whoworks as an intern with the Interna-tional Student Ofce, said this is herthird year perorming the Newaridance at Nepal Nite.
“I love learning about a dier-ent culture,” Endel said. “It’s a greatexperience to learn what we have incommon.”Endel said she was one o the sev-eral non-Nepalese students includedin organizing the event which took a
JOHN SADLER
Staff Reporter
In 1964, Peter Higgs predict-ed the Higgs Boson, a particleso important it has been namedthe “God particle.”Forty-nine years later, physi-cists have tentatively ound“God.”Recently, all eyes in the phys-ics world have been ocused onthe Large Hadron Collider, aparticle accelerator on the bor-der o France and Switzerland.Zeno Greenwood, an asso-ciate proessor o physics, saidthe Collider is a large circularmachine that launches beamso particles into one another.He said that the resulting colli-sions allow us to see what theseparticles are made o.“It has very strong magneticfelds,” Greenwood said. “Thiscauses the two beams to col-lide.”Greenwood said that Tech isinvolved in the project measur-ing the particles these collisionsproduce. Known as the A Toroi-dal LHC Apparatus, or ATLASproject, it is one o two similarprojects at the Collider.“You can think o the ATLASdetector as a cylindrical onion,”Greenwood said. “It determineshow ast, and in what direction,the particles made by these
PAUL HARRIS
Staff Reporter
More than fteen years o dedicationor a passion can be extended or dimin-ished in one workout by ractions o asecond.Twenty-nine ormer Tech ootballplayers arrived at Joe Aillet StadiumTuesday morning with the same aspira-tion, to continue playing the game o ootball.These ormer Tech players attendedTech’s annual “pro day.” NFL scouts romover 20 teams were present to overseeTech’s ormer talents.There are some talented kids com-ing out o Tech’s program and it showed both throughout the 2012 season as wellas at this event today, associate directoro media relations Patrick Walsh said.“To have so many scouts come out towant to see what our kids can do is in-credible,” Walsh said.The scouts started the day measuringthe height and weight o all prospectsparticipating, ollowed by their hand andwingspan measurements.Damon Harrington, strength and con-ditioning coach, oversaw the entire eventin the weight room and on the game feld.Following the measurements the play-ers were allowed a short time to warm up beore the actual drills began Harringtonsaid.“The frst three drills: vertical jump,standing long jump and bench press,took place in the weight room,” Har-rington said.Former Tech wide receiver MylesWhite, said that Ray Holley [ormer Techrunning back] stole the show.
SGA topurchasedollies
Search forGod particlecontinues
>
see
SGA
page 6
>
see
SEARCH
page 6
Years measured intenths of seconds
Students raise the ‘Roof of the World’ at Nepal Nite
Photo by Chad Merritt
Senior Quinton Patton shows off his skills as NFL scouts look for potential recruits.
Photo by Deepanjan Mukhopadhyay
Sanjog Bikram KC, a senior biomedical engineering major, leads the stage.
>
see
NEPAL
ae 6
>
see
NFL
page 3
Photos by Tyler Brown
 
Shrestha named Mr. Tech 2013
CODY SEXTON
Staff Reporter
A group some consider to beTech’s most dapper men linedthe stage in Howard auditoriumTuesday night or the secondannual Mr. Tech 2013 Pageant.The nine contestants stoodtall as they looked out to thepanel o six judges comprisedo Tech sta, alumni and theirproessional peers.The pageant was hosted bythe reigning Miss LouisianaTech, Julianne Tippen, who act-ed as the evening’s emcee andintroduced the contestants tothe audience.The proceeds rom the $3 ad-mission ee will go to the Child’sMiracle Network Hospital.“I am hoping to have this[Mr. Tech] become Miss Tech’sphilanthropy,” Tippen said. “I’malso hoping to get Union Boardinvolved and make it as big asMiss Louisiana Tech.”Tippen then presented thecontestants with a walkthroughand introduction beore they ex-ited the stage to prepare or thenext portion o the pageant.During their absence, thereigning Miss Dixie Gem Peach,Mallory Cox, played a renditiono the “Tom and Jerry,” inspired“Cat and Mouse” on piano.Following Cox’s peror-mance, each contestant dis-played his individuality by pre-senting himsel in an outft o his own choice.The clothing, or at times lack o, varied rom ull Tech apparelto nothing more than shorts and boat shoes.The pageant’s talent portionshowed the contestants’ skills,which ranged rom dancing tokung u to singing original songs.Lou Pharis, a junior speechcommunication major, recited apoem that told o his desires toget to know a woman rom theneck up.Ater a short intermission,the contestants presentedthemselves in ormal wearand answered questionsasked by Tippen.Shashank Shrestha, a ju-nior economics major, wasasked i he thinks the budgetcuts in education have aect-ed Tech.“I don’t think it’s aected
 
>
see
MR. TECH
page 2
Photo by Tyler Brown
Shashank Shrestha, a junior economics major and newly named Mr. Tech, dances for Julianne Tippen, Miss Tech 2012.
Former Bulldogs show off skills to scouts
SPRINGBREAKERS
Students love spring break.Is this flm is the exception?
MOVIE REVIEW 
 
PAGE
5
Is the home of the Bulldogs being taken over by 
PAGE
7
 
2
The Tech Talk
March 28, 2013
Campus
 
114 W. PARK AVENUERUSTON, LA 71270P:
318.255.8320
CLOSED
SUNDAY & MONDAYHOURS
TUESDAY - SATURDAY4 PM - 11 PM
RESTAURANT SUSHI BAR LOUNGE
JOHN SADLER
Staff Reporter
Everyone’s eyes were to theront as Cristin Nunez stepped behind the podium and askedto be excused or any giddiness,as she was just married threedays beore.Thus began Nunezs’ lec-ture on marketing artwork atthe opening reception or theSchool o art Annual StudentShow. Nunez is assistant direc-tor at the Cole Pratt Gallery inNew Orleans and served as ju-ror or the show.“I knew Marie Bukowski,an art proessor here, rom thegallery business,” Nunez said.“She asked me to be here andI thought it’d be un.”
The School of Art’s AnnualStudent Show is an exhibitionof Tech students’ art. Lastingfor the duration of a month, itallows the community to viewand purchase local piecesfrom up-and-coming art stu-dents.
“Jurying was dicult,”Nunez said. “Everyone whoentered was very talented,and there just weren’t enoughawards.”Johnathan Courter, a sopho-more photography major, re-ceived the best in photographyaward.He said he was really anx-ious waiting or the results.“It’s exciting. I don’t evenknow how to explain it,” hesaid. “It’s like a weight o myshoulders.”Les Guice, vice presidento research and development,said he is proud o the art stu-dents and the art department ingeneral.“This aculty is as good asI’ve ever seen,” said Guice, whowill become Tech president atJuly. “They’re just so strong andso passionate. They’re commit-ted.”This event is extremely im-portant or the student body,Guice said.“This is an opportunity orthem to not only showcase theirwork, but also to show that theirwork is valued,” Guice said.Elizabeth Lenox, a reshmanart education major, said thatthe show is very important orthe artists.“It’s really a good displayo what the School o Art is allabout,” Lenox said.Lenox, who received besto core, an award or studentsin their rst year o art classes,said she was extremely sur-prised she won.“I got here late and I hadno idea I was going to win,”she said. “I was so happy, I eelprivileged.”
Jonathan Donehoo, the direc-tor of the school of art, said healso shares Guice’s sentiments.
“Every year, you’re just soproud,” Donehoo said. “Wewant as many people as pos-sible to see what we do.”Donehoo said he is con-stantly surprised the environ-ment some o the artists havegrown up in has not infuencedthem.“There are a lot o studentshere with a rural background,maybe one where they aren’texposed to much culture,” hesaid. “I’m not really seeing thisact as a detriment, becausethese students can producesome very sophisticated art.”Donehoo said the show is agood thing or the students whohave entered.“It’s an opportunity or stu-dents to show their work,” hesaid. “They can get some at-tention or it and maybe a littlemoney. We sell quite a bit every year.”Marisa Estes, senior Englisheducation major, said she wasthere or her riend who had apiece in competition.Estes said she was im-pressed with the variety o arton display at the show.“Art is something that makesme eel, evokes my emotion,and makes me think,” Estessaid. “There are quite a ewpieces here that t that.”
Email comments to  jts040@latech.edu.
CODY SEXTON
Staff Reporter
Temperatures are rising as spring-time creeps its way onto campus.As the seasons change, so do thehabits o Tech students.More o them are outside poundingthe pavement to work o winter weightgained during the holidays.Emma Paille said she is just startingto run again because she believes it is agreat way to get t and eel good aboutit.“You eel better ater a run, relieved,like you’ve accomplished something,”said Paille, a reshman agriculture edu-cation major.While some like to work out alone,Paille enjoys the company o a riend.“Running with someone motivates you more,” she said. “You can encour-age each other.”Paille said she started by running oneto three miles every other day in the a-ternoon or evening.She said she also preers to do sooutside.“I don’t like running on a treadmill,”she said. “You’re not going anywhere,and I like scenery.”On the days she does not run, Paillesaid she preers to work out her arms us-ing ree weights.Not everyone waited or the weatherto warm up to start getting back intoshape.Alex Broussard, a sophomore ac-counting major, said she has been work-ing out or two months and does notmind running in the cold at all.“I’m trying to get in shape or a skitrip,” Broussard said. “My dad lives inColorado, and i you’re not in shapewhen you ski, you can get your buttkicked.”Broussard said it does not take longto notice a change in one’s perormanceand endurance.“I started on the track where I wouldrun one straight and then walk three, butnow I can run three straight and I’ll onlywalk one,” she said.While it is popular to run the track at Garland Gregory Hideaway Park,Broussard said she preers to cross thepond and run in the woods.“It’s so peaceul,” she said. “I’ll takemy ear buds out and enjoy the peaceulsilence.”Another way to shed unwantedweight is in the kitchen, said SusanHughes, a nutrition proessor at Tech.She said the best advice or thosewith limited workout time is to cut back on energy-dense, low-nutrient oods.“These oods are sometimes called‘empty’ calories,” she said. “Meaningthat they supply lots o energy, but veryew nutrients.”Some easy “empty” calories to cutrom one’s diet include sugar-sweetened beverages.Instead, Hughes advises active indi-viduals to drink water.For those who want to consumeoods to boost their athletic perormanc-es, they need to ocus on the consump-tion o lean proteins and carbohydrates.“High-at oods tend to delay the pas-sage o ood rom the stomach,” Hughessaid. “Which can be very unpleasant orsomeone who is trying to participate inan athletic event.”The Academy o Nutrition and Di-etetics website, eatright.org, recom-mends athletes to consume smallermeals more requently.Some post-workout snacks the Acad-emy recommends or reueling includea combination o proteins and carbo-hydrates, like peanut butter on a tortillaand apple slices.Veteran runners like Broussard un-derstand to the diculty o beginning aworkout routine and how many get dis-couraged easily.“Just do it,” is her advice or peoplewith that mentality.She said once a person gets into theroutine o running, it becomes secondnature and does not have to be a timeconsuming activity.“Just remember,” Broussard said,“one hour o running is only our per-cent o your day.”
Email comments to cls068@latech.edu.
Tech Union Board will hostAmerican illusionist Mike Superat 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 2, inHoward Auditorium, Center orthe Perorming Arts.Super was named the “BestMystier in the World” ater hewon the NBC show “Phenom-enon” in 2007.Super has also been namedthe 2011 Entertainer o theYear by the International Ma-gicians Society, and CampusActivities Magazine named himAmerica’s Best Entertainer o the Year.The show diers rom othermagic shows because Super’sillusions are all perormed onaudience members.He’s been known to makespectators levitate or disappear.On the show “Phenomenon”Super used a voodoo doll on“Girls Next Door” star, BridgetMarquardt, and once made El-len DeGeneres disappear onher talk show.The show is ree or Techstudents.For more inormation callthe Union Board Oce at (318)257-4237.The Tech ootball team isopening its spring practices tothe public at 3:15 p.m. Monday,Wednesday and Friday ater-noons at Joe Aillet Stadium.There are also practices at 8a.m. Saturday mornings thatare open to the public.Practices will continue untilApril 13, the day o the springgame. Attendance is ree to thepublic.For more inormation con-tact Challiss Cappel at (318)257-4547.The Career and Counsel-ing Center is oering a Vi-sion Group seminar at 3 p.m.Wednesday, April on the thirdfoor o Keeny Hall.The vision group consistso three meetings lasting twohours each where students joinwith others in a small group set-ting to assess their skills andabilities, work interest, tempera-ment and work related values.Assistance is oered by a li-censed proessional counselorto compile a list o occupation-al options, and to help studentsbetter access current career in-ormation.This is a way or studentsto get advice rom proessionalpersonnel and gain knowledgeon uture business advice.The conerence is by regis-tration only, so be sure to signup.For more inormation con-tact Ashley Allen, career de-velopment coordinator, at (318)257-2488 or at aallen@latech.edu.
Students shape up for spring
Photo by Deepanjan MukhopadhyayPhoto by John Sadler
Students showcase art at annual show
Art show attendees admire student artwork submitted to the annual student art show.Samuel Wozinski, electrical engineering junior (white shirt), and Shane Greer, studio arts junior (grey shirt), take a break from their jog.
Union Board to hostaward-winningillusionist TuesdayCareer/counselingcenter offers visiongroup seminarSpring football teampractices open forthe public to watch
>
MR. TECH
from pg. 1
Tech rom what I’ve noticed and that theschool is still doing great,” Shrestha said.Once the judges tallied the contestants’scores based on rst impression, stage pres-ence and condence, Trippen announcedthe pageant winners.The winner o the People’s ChoiceAward, an award chosen by the audiencethrough $1 votes or their avorite contes-tant, was Andrew Lewis, a sophomore biol-ogy major.Second and rst runners up were Chris-tian Stamps, a junior economics major, andNeil Watkins, a junior biology major, respec-tively.As the audience banged on their chairsand knees to create a drum roll eect, Trip-pen announced Shreshtha as Mr. Tech 2013.“I was breathless,” he said. “I asked MissTech backstage how it eels to win and shesaid it eels amazing and it does. I want tothank everyone.”Shreshtha said that with this title, he has aplatorm he will be able to reach more peo-ple and he hopes to help students broadentheir horizons, internationally speaking.“Most o the people here are rom Rus-ton,” he said. “I want to show them there areopportunities around the world or them.” 
Email comments to cls068@latech.edu.
NEEDED
COACHES & UMPIRES
at Lincoln Little League
contact (318) 382-3083 for more information
LET’S BE FRIENDS!
VISIT US ON FACEBOOK 
 TalkTech
T
he
 
March 28, 2013
The Tech Talk
3
PAUL HARRIS
Staff Reporter
Holly Cooke, a juniorspeech pathology major,stepped up to the plate tomush an American pie intoher riend’s ace. The oppor-tunity cost her more than$100.Cooke said she was ableto bash her riend with a pie.“It was really good be-cause it was innocent un,”Cooke said. “Usually the pieauction doesn’t get as muchattention, but this year wasthe best turnout I’ve everseen.”This pie smashing oc-curred at Baptist CollegiateMinistry held an annual pieauction Tuesday, March 19,to raise unds or summermission trips.Dawson Shannon, areshman political sciencemajor, said he is a membero the mission leadershipteam. Shannon said theirmain goal is to raise undsor mission trips.“Basically, the pie auctionis members o the BCM whohave come together to bakepies and have people bid onthem,” Shannon said.Once a bidder has won apie, he or she has two choices:to keep the pie to eat or bashit in the baker’s ace, Shannonsaid.Kevin Inman, the BCM di-rector, said he was moved bythe pie auction and the team-work he witnessed.“This is the most we’veever raised at the pie auction,”Inman said. “The goal o thisis to raise money to help sendstudents around the world toshare the gospel.”Shannon said the missiontrips are headed to Kazakh-stan and Hawaii this summer.“I’m going to be a part o the trip to Kazakhstan, andI’m excited to share the wordthere,” Shannon said.Tech’s BCM cooperateswith other BCMs around thestate to help raise the neededmoney to und mission trips,Inman said.He said various events will be held around the state byother BCMs to raise money ina collaborative eort.“Our money also helpsall the colleges in Louisianasend these wonderul studentsaround the world to share theword o Christ,” Inman said.“We call this the ‘CooperativeProgram,’ and it’s special be-cause people come togetheras one.”Kate Warner, a sophomore biology major, said she is themission’s team leader, and shesaid she was pleased with theresults o the event.“I love how people who hadalready bid on pies continuedto bid through the night, know-ing that all their money wasgoing to a good cause,” War-ner said.Irvin Wasswa, a juniorspeech communication ma- jor, said he participated in the bidding process at the pie auc-tion.“This is my rst year beinga part o BCM and I love it,”Wasswa said. “It’s great to seethe body o Christ come to-gether and serve in this way.”Sarah McAllister, a sopho-more amily and child sci-ences major, said she bakedpies or people to bid on in theauction.She said this was a positiveexperience or her.“I’m just really grateul thatthe BCM does this because Ihave a riend that went over-seas this summer,” McAllistersaid. “The opportunity to beable to support her by simplymaking a pie is gratiying orme.”Sarah Kilpatrick, a juniorpsychology major, said shewas the victim o Cooke’s piemashing.“It was un to get messy,”Kilpatrick said. “When I waspied I thought I was going toall over. In retrospect, I wish Idid because that wouldhave been unnier.”The BCM will continue toraise money to und the youngpeople that are inspired by thewords o Christ, Inman said.“It’s humbling and leavesme in awe to see students thathave a love or Christ and wantto share that with others,” In-man said. “That’s how we areable to raise these unds.”
Email comments to  phh007@latech.edu.
BLAKE BOLIN
Staff Reporter
Each day in Bogard Hall,there is a group o studentsworking rom sunrise to sunseton Tech’s own baja car.“A baja car is an o-road ve-hicle capable o going throughany kind o rugged terrain,”said Vance Liles, preident o the Society o Automotive En-gineers. “The terrain variesrom year to year.”Liles said the car is a projecto the organization, which iscomprised o students interest-ed in the structure and designo motored vehicles.Liles said he and other mem-bers o SAE work endlessly onthe car, preparing to enter aninternational competition heldat Tennessee Tech in Cooke-ville, Tenn.“For the competition, wewere shipped a Briggs andStratton motor with a page rule-book and told to build a car,” Li-les said. “The goal is to build acar rom the ground up that isable to withstand anything youthrow at it.”Liles said the design processstarted in October, and the ac-tual building began in early De-cember.Former SAE president JasonFletcher, a senior civil engineer-ing major, said he is amiliarwith the process and knowshow much patience is required.“I cannot even describe toyou the amount o stress in-volved in this completion,”Fletcher said. “In 2010 weloaded up the car in the trailerat literally the last possible sec-ond so we could make it to thecompetition on time.”Fletcher said in 2010, SAEcompeted in its rst baja carcompetition since the 90s. Agap that wide between yearscompeting let SAE inexperi-enced.“In 2010, our rst year in thecompetition, we did not get tocompete,” Fletcher said. “Wewere an inexperienced teamwho did not meet the rame cri-teria. It was a major disappoint-ment, and I hope that the guystoday learn rom our mistakesin the past.”The baja car competitiontakes place April 18-21. Prepar-ing the baja car in time or thecompetition is going to take alot o work rom everybody,which means SAE memberswill have to record more hoursthan they have already, Lilessaid.“We have about six peoplewho have worked on it consis-tently, and I would say that eacho them has logged at least 300hours working on the car,” Lilessaid.When SAE leaves or Ten-nessee Tech, they will not just be loading up the car, but theywill be bringing quite a bit more,said Tanner Martin, a juniormechanical engineering major.“We have to pack our entireshop into a trailer in preparationor any kind o breakdowns wehave at the event,” Martin said.As SAE continues to work countless hours in preparationor the competition, they willhave the support o their or-mer president, Fletcher said.“I tried to make the organiza-tion what it could be, but it wasmy time to pass on the torch,”Fletcher said. “They have a carthat we used and I think theywill use that to succeed.”With the competition near-ing, SAE is working to put thenal touches on their car and bring back an award, winning baja car to Ruston.“I think we are going to do better than any other years be-ore,” Martin said. “We have a baja car to build oo, and itis already nished more than amonth beore the competition.This is probably going to be the best year we have had.”
Email comments to btb017@latech.edu.
Submitted Photo
Members of SAE test out the baja car that will be entered into an international competition at Tennesse Univeristy in Cookeville, Tenn.
Rough riders ready for race
Photo by Derek J. Amaya
The Baptist Collegiate Ministry hosted its annual pie auction to donate money for future summermission trips.
Pie smashing with a mission
Engineering students design, build baja car or international competition
Submitted Photo
A Society of Automotive Engineers member is seated in the off-road vehicle called a baja car built by the members.
>
NFL
from pg. 1
Holley muscled out 27reps on the bench presstest and jumped a 41”vertical.“I was excited aboutmy results,” said Holley.“You always want to beable to do more, but Ithink all my training paido well or me.”Following the tests in-side the weight room, theprospects unneled out tothe tur to perorm moredrills the scouts wantedto evaluate.The rst test to beevaluated by the NFLscouts outside was the40-yard dash. The playerswere tested in alphabeti-cal order Harrington said.Top perormers werewide receivers QuintonPatton and Myles White,who both were able to rununocial 4.4’s. Patton re-corded an unocial 4.47and White ran an uno-cial 4.44, Harrington said.Following the orty,the prospects were splitinto two groups. Oneperormed the pro-agilityshuttle, while the othergroup perormed the L-drill. The 60-yard shuttleconcluded standardizedtesting by the scouts.Malon Lee, a BatonRouge native and ormerTech running back, saidhe was ortunate to beable to participate in theevent.“It is a true humble blessing because a lot o people would kill to be inmy position,” said Lee. “Alot o guys never get thechance to participate inD1 athletics and I’ve beenhumbled through this en-tire process.”The prospects werethen able to participate in“position-specic” drillsto conclude Pro Day.Colby Cameron, 2012WAC Oensive Player o the Year, said the day wassurreal.“It’s weird waking upknowing that this daycould possibly be the lastday throwing to the guys you’ve thrown to the lastve years,” said Camer-on. “I was just anxious todisplay my talent that I’ve been given, but it’s bit-tersweet knowing that it’sthe end or me at Tech.Time fies.”Patton has talked toalmost all the NFL teamsthus ar, he said.“They’ve all told mereally the same thing, I just want to compete atthe next level,” Pattonsaid. “I didn’t have towork out today, but I’mnot that type o athlete Ilove to compete.”Another top NFLprospect rom Tech isJordan Mills, an oensivelineman who was contentwith his perormance.“I did well gettingwork in with the Jets o-ensive line coaches,”Mills said. “As a playerI’m a leader, I’m humbledand I will ght every playto the end.”Holley said he wasexcited to be able to im-prove on all his initialnumbers rom the start o his training.“It’s no surprise to me because there’s never been a day in my liewhere I didn’t believe Ihad a chance; that’s parto being a competitor,”Holley said. “Today wasconrmation that I mightget a shot at the NFL,and those dreams could become a reality or meto continue to pursue mypassion.”Although the day wasa closure or many ormerTech athletes at this ven-ue, the mood was not “it’sover,” it is “what’s next?”“I’m not happy toleave, but when it’s time,it’s time,” Holley said. “Inlie, sometimes you justhave to accept it, em- brace it and go get it.”
Email comments to  phh007@latech.edu.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->