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DP-0328-A1

DP-0328-A1

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Published by The Delphos Herald
2013 Delphos Herald Progress A Section
2013 Delphos Herald Progress A Section

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Published by: The Delphos Herald on Mar 28, 2013
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HEALTH & MEDICINEBUSINESS & INDUSTRYCOMMUNICATIONSENERGY CONSERVATIONCONSTRUCTION
"DifferenceMakers inBusiness& Industry"
A Special Supplement To The Delphos HeraldMarch 2013
 
A
Section
D
ELPHOS
H
ERALD
T
HE
        I        N        D        E        X
AD ...STORYGasdorf Tool and Machine ...................2A ...........2ABunge ...................................................3A ...........3ASchmitt Massa & Lloyd Ins. Agency .....4A ...........4AFort Jennings Telephone Co. ...............4ADelpha ..................................................4AWestrich Furniture ................................5A ...........5AFort Jennings State Bank .....................5A ...........5ACommunity Health Professionals .........6A ...........6APaulding Putnam Electric Cooperative .6AEasy Auto Credit...................................6AC. Allan Runser, AttorneyShaun R. Putman, Attorney ..................6AHelena ..................................................7ADick’s Steakhouse ................................7ASt. Rita’s ...............................................7ADelphos Area Chamber of Commerce .7A Allied Environmental Services Inc. .......8A ...........8AGreve ...................................................8AGarmann/Miller .....................................9A ...........9AVancrest ................................................9ADominion ..............................................9ADelphos Herald .....................................9AFarm Credit Services..........................10A .........10ALee Kinstle ..........................................10A .........10ANiswonger...........................................11A .........11AFirst Federal Bank ..............................11ASydney Electric ...................................12A
DIFFERENCE MAKERS
in Business& Industry
60
(An ISO 9001:2008 Certifed Company)
Gasdorf Tool and MachineCo., Inc., 445 N. McDonelSt., Lima, was establishedin 1953 and has long beenrecognized as a pacesetter inprecision manufacturing.Gasdorf provides completeservices ranging from conceptto engineering to machinebuilding and installation. Thecompany offers quality prod-ucts to over 400 customersnationwide.Gasdorf upholds a repu-tation of excellence withinthe small electric motor andpackaging industries. Localcompanies benefit from main-tenance services, rework andrebuilding tasks that directlyensure community progress.As Gasdorf maintains itscompetitive edge, its manu-facturing capabilities includeAutocad design, CNC oper-ations and other techni-cally advanced equipment.Stringent quality control pro-cedures guarantee accuracyin compliance with militarystandards and extremely closetolerance work.Gasdorf encourages tooland die skills through activeinvolvement in apprenticetraining programs. An SMEaffiliate member since 1957,Gasdorf promotes innovationand is committed to the belief that knowledge and experi-ence make this company anindustry leader.
 
Gasdorf Tool andMachine Co.
The Gasdorf name issynoymouswithexcellenceworldwide! 
Delphos looking at water projects, new bridges
BY NANCY SPENCERnspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — A few pumps is all that standsin the way of the completion of the WaterTreatment Plant By-Pass Improvement Projectat Waterworks Park in Delphos.The city contracted with PetersonConstruction for the project in December.Phase II included bidding ($3,500), con-struction administration ($3,000) and con-struction observation ($4,300). Total construc-tion was estimated to cost $247,000, with aCommunity Development Block Grant cover-ing $194,500.According to Safety Service Director GregBerquist, there is a bottleneck between the clear-wells and the water plant and the improvementswould increase the city’s capacity to providewater.“The clearwells are used for chlorine contactfor water before it is moved to the upgroundtanks for distribution. The clearwells are cur-rently connected so water has to go throughall three before becoming available to move tothe tanks. Part of the project will also includeseparating the clearwells so they can be usedindividually as well. This will also make it pos-sible to put more water into the tanks in a shorterperiod of time,” he said.The city is getting ready to begin two morewater projects. A Gressel Drive water loop proj-ect will get underway soon. Berquist said thecity the Community Improvement Corporationis taking possession of a parcel of land neces-sary for the infrastructure expansion and thataction will significantly reduce the overall proj-ect expected cost from $140,000 to $80,000 asthe city will only need to obtain an easementthrough the property owned by the CIC.Berquist said the loop will provide greaterfire safety for the area and better water qualityfor food manufacturing.Council is currently considering legislationapproving a low-interest to pay for the project.A water loop project on Cass Street willrelieve residents from experiencing discoloredwater which affects laundry and drinkabilitybecause they are on the end of a water line.Berquist said Poggemeyer Design Grouphas already been contacted for engineering onthe project and bids will be opened at the endof March.Bunge has granted the city an easement toinstall the water loop.Delphos also took possession of a new policepatrol car this year and will look to receiveanother in the coming months.The city’s recreational facilities saw improve-ment in 2012 and will continue to do this year.The Delphos Stadium Club finished a wrought-iron fence project around the football field andare in the process of putting in new sidewalksat Waterworks Park to connect the new walkbridge that was installed this winter to otherpaths in the park.The swimming pool will continue to seerepairs as stainless steel is installed in the wallson the west side this year. The east side wasdone last year. The decking in the area of thereinforcement will also be re-caulked.Berquist added that several bridges withinthe city qualify under the federal bridge programfor replacement. The program is a 80/20 match.Berquist said while bridges usually fall undercounty jurisdiction, the three in question arewithin the city limits and fall under the city’sresponsibilities. They are on Seventh, Sixth andPierce streets where Flat Fork Creek runs underthe roadways.
Delphos City Schools enjoying glow of success
BY NANCY SPENCERnspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — The CitySchools are enjoying the after-math of the State Report Cardfor 2012-13. The district as awhole was ranked Excellentwith Jefferson Middle Schoola “School of Promise” andFranklin Elementary ratedExcellent with Distinction.According to the ODE,the School of Promise pro-gram was started in 2003 tohelp close the math and read-ing achievement gap for stu-dents who represent a rangeof socioeconomic and ethnicbackgrounds.“Being named a School of Promise is an honor,” JeffersonMiddle School Principal TerryMoreo said. “This award is big-ger than one building. It repre-sents the quality of instructionbeing taught by every teacherin our district.”Getting everyone on thesame page is a lot of work.“We have bi-monthlymeetings with teachers toalign lessons with state cur-riculum guidelines to apply toteaching,” Moreo said. “Eachcourse of lessons is mappedout monthly.”Finding the students whoneed the extra help to keep upwith their peers is key.“We do six individual short-cycle assessments with eachstudent. Their success is chart-ed and instruction is adjustedto them,” Moreo said. “Ourteachers realize that to makeeducational progress requireschange. Daily our teach-ers making practice of thischange.”In wake of the Sandy HookSchool shooting in Newtown,Conn., several district build-ings will see increased safetymeasures including JeffersonMiddle School, JeffersonHigh School and Landeck.New intercom systems will beinstalled at each entryway inthe buildings. Franklin alreadyhas doors visitors have to bebuzzed in to enter.Like all Ohio school dis-tricts, Delphos is working onthe newly-mandated teacherevaluation process.
The Delphos Stadium Club continues projects at Stadium and Waterworks parks.Above: A wrought-iron fencing project at Stadium Park around the football field. Below:Sidewalks are the next order of business at Waterworks Park to connect the new walkbridge to the rest of the grounds.
 Business storiessubmitted byadvertisers.
 
Our Employees are:
Dedicated to improving the agribusiness and food production chain since 1818.Leader in North America for consistent,high-quality oilseed processing products and service.
We’reproudofourthrivingcommu-nityandproudtohaveplayedapartinDelphos’growthforover100years!Bungeextendsaspecialcongratula-tionstothecommunity.Ittookagreatdealofsupport,cooperation,andhardworkfromalotofpeopleforDelphostogrowandprosper,andwe’reproudthatinasmallwayBungeanditsemployeeswereapartofitall.Bunge,likeDelphos,hasaheritageofgrowthandafuturetoshare.And,likethiscommunity,weplantocontinueourvitallyimportantroleandtogrowinser-vice.We’regladthatitwillhappenrightinDelphos!
Dave AllemeierShawn AllemeierRobert AndrewsTodd BarnhartJustic BrownGary CarterTony CarterErick EickholtMike FinnTerry FischerMatt FoustDonnie FowlerRick GableGreg GarzaJaime GarzaDebra GeierJoe GeiseLarry GrigsbyCory HaehnJoe HoffmanJim HolmanAngie HullDavid HunterRichard JonesLogan KehresJeremy KlineZach KnebelRobin KriegelRyan KriegelDaniel KuehnTom MerschmanAustin MillerFrank MillerTravis MillerDoug MilliganDoug Milligan Jr.Tony MatneyScott MoenterDan MuellerKevin OstingJerry ParrishMichael PlackeJoe PriceMark RobeyRyan RobeyMark SchramJeremy StangerTony SueverJohn SwickrathJayne SwygartMichael TruesdaleKevin WhiteDave Zalar
234 S. Jefferson St.Delphos, OhioPh. 419-692-6010www.bunge.com
Bunge Limited, founded in 1818, is aleading agribusiness and food company withintegrated operations that circle the globe.Bunge employs over 32,000 employees atover 400 facilities in over 30 countries.Bunge’s agribusiness operations processand transport tens of millions of tons of com-modities every year. The facility at 234 SouthJefferson street is a soybean processing plantoriginally built in 1909. The business pur-chases soybeans which are processed tomake soybean oil and meal. The oil is sent tothe company’s other locations for further pro-cessing into various food products. The mealis sold to customers both locally and globally.The Delphos facility has been makingsoybean oil and meal since the 1940s andemploys 53 people. Office hours are 8 a.m.to 4:30 p.m., with grain receiving hours of 7a.m. to 7 p.m.Tony Matney is the Facility Manager.For more information about the company,visit the company’s website at : www.bunge.com
Bunge Limited
 Bunge is a leading agribusiness and food companywith integratedoperations that circlethe globe, stretch-ing from farm fieldto the retail shelf.
March 2013 The Herald Progress Edition 3A
Spencerville to see completion of new water plant
BY STEPHANIE GROVESsgroves@delphosherald.com
SPENCERVILLE —Spencerville’s new water treat-ment facility, which will be locat-ed adjacent to the SpencervilleSwimming Pool on BroadwayStreet, will be completed in midMay. The 8 containers, which arebeing constructed in and trans-ported from Quebec, Canada, byH2O Innovation, will arrive May13. The installation will beginwith the tanks being unloadedfrom the carrier and set in placeand the plumbing and electricalwork will follow.The funds were securedthrough the Ohio EPA, The OhioDepartment of Developmentwater and sewer grant pro-gram and the Water SupplyRevolving Loan Account(WSRLA) program through theEPA. The total project will cost$3.2 million with the electricalportion of the project tallyingapproximately $467,000.The original scheduled com-pletion was set for this pastMarch 4 but design revisionsstretched the tentative comple-tion time by more than fivemonths. With a custom projectof this magnitude, the villageengineer and innovation’s teamhad to collaborate on the designbefore a viable schematic wasdevised.Once the system is up andrunning, residents will havequality, filtered, softened waterto utilize in their homes for20-27 cents per day, which is thecost to pay debt service back. Inthe summer of 2012, the villagecompleted the repair of a mainline—which leaked for close toone year— that ran under therailroad tracks at Route 66. The$50,000 project was paid for bythe village.The culvert project is now inthe design and funding phaseand entails replacing the brokenmain line, which engineers esti-mate at $1 million. It is slated tobe apportioned into fiscal year2016’s budget.Spencerville has many in-house construction projectson tap for the upcoming year,which includes; replacing 100-1200 lineal feet of water main;adding 300 lineal feet of 12”storm sewer pipe at the watertreatment plane; tie drainagecomponents from swimmingpool into new water main; pavewaste water facilities’ driveat $17,500 mid to late spring;replace the water line under thevillage Utility Dept. parkinglot and then pour a concretelot; and re-paint the entireswimming pool by the June 1deadline for $5,000.The village will also takeadvantage of Moving OhioForward Grant program, whichfinancially aids communitiesundertaking activities to demol-ish dilapidated abandoned andvacant residential properties.These properties have struc-tures on them no one willbuy and on average, will cost$7,000 to raze. The villagemay be in the position to holdproperty owners accountableand assess them the portion of the cost of demolition (10-15percent) that the village mayhave to absorb.
Spencerville Local Schoolsworking to meet raised bar
BY STACY TAFFstaff@delphosherald.com
SPENCERVILLE — Due to the raisedbar put in place by the Ohio Departmentof Education with the new Common CoreStandards and teacher/principal evaluationsystem, local schools have been scramblingover the last year to prepare their studentsand staff for the higher expectations. Thenew standards, which cover core stud-ies like math, science, social studies andEnglish language arts, are expected to befully in place for all grade levels during the2013-14 school year.Spencerville Schools, which has beenrated “Excellent” or “Excellent withDistinction” for the last five years on theOhio Report Card, continues to work onkeeping up.“We continue to work on implement-ing the new common core, some of thisinvolves deconstructing the new standardsand the alignment of curriculum, particu-larly in math,” Superintendent Joel Hatfieldsaid. “We are hopeful that we will be able topurchase a number of new math textbooksat various grade levels where we are mostin need.“We also continue the process of prepar-ing the staff and administration for the newOhio Teacher Evaluation System and OhioPrincipal Evaluation System that will begoing into effect. We will need to have arecommendation ready for the board of edu-cation to approve in June. The staff has alsobeen working hard at learning to write newStudent Learning Objectives and StudentGrowth Measures. We are learning a wholebunch of new acronyms.”The district is also looking to give stu-dents more opportunities to get a leg upinto college by adding more college-levelcourses.“The high school has implemented sev-eral ‘dual enrollment’ classes in Spanishand business in conjunction with RhodesState College and are currently workingwith Urbana University to expand the num-ber of college courses we offer here atSpencerville High School for next year,”he said.Student safety is always of paramountconcern to school district officials but afterthe tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementaryin Newtown, CT, Spencerville, like mostschools, is ratcheting up the level of secu-rity it offers and training staff to respondbetter in the event of an emergency.“Our Crisis Response Team has recentlycompleted a revision of our EmergencyAction Guide, with the support of localpolice, EMS, fire department and the AllenCounty EMA,” Hatfield said. “This docu-ment, along with updated maps, has beensubmitted to the Ohio Attorney General’soffice in accordance with state law.”Despite all the issues, changes and man-dates that public schools have dealt withover the last several years and will con-tinue to deal with for several more at least,Hatfield says he’s proud of the way hisdistrict has been persevering.“I am very proud of how hard our staff has worked over the last few years to incor-porate all the new changes coming downfrom Columbus,” he said. “This work hasbeen done in spite of the frustration of stillnot knowing what will be expected of us inthe near future.”

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