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Table Of Contents

Acknowledgements
Te ocean of ink: a long introduction
The more things change
The last Masquerade at the Pantheon
This invisible je ne scay quoi
The fashion fair
Balloonomania: the pursuit of knowledge and the culture of the spectacle
Beautiful invention
The present rage
Adventurous heroes
The world as it goes
Bibliomania: the rage for books and the spectacle of culture
Bedlam
Curious libraries
The cacoethes scribendi
The helluo librorum
Men of taste
Foolish knowledge: the little world of microcosmopolitan literature
Diffusing knowledge far and wide
The historian of character and manners
The miscellany of life
Trifling occurrences and little occupations
The politics of politeness
“The low-life of literature”
Houseless wanderers
The highways of literature
The crowd of life
Scattered seeds
Te Learned Pig: enlightening the reading public
Illiterate readers
Erudite swine
Wonderful knowledge
Afterword: A swinish multitude: the tyranny of fashion in the 1790s
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Literature Commerce and the Spectacle of Modernity

Literature Commerce and the Spectacle of Modernity

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Published by Diego Morelli
Paul Keen explores how a consumer revolution which reached its peak in the second half of the eighteenth century shaped debates about the role of literature in a polite modern nation, and tells the story of the resourcefulness with which many writers responded to these pressures. From dream reveries which mocked their own entrepreneurial commitments, such as Oliver Goldsmith's account of selling his work at a 'Fashion Fair' on the frozen Thames, to the Microcosm's mock plan to establish 'a licensed warehouse for wit,' writers insistently tied their literary achievements to a sophisticated understanding of the uncertain complexities of a modern transnational society. This book combines a new understanding of late eighteenth-century literature with the materialist and sociological imperatives of book history and theoretically inflected approaches to cultural history.
Paul Keen explores how a consumer revolution which reached its peak in the second half of the eighteenth century shaped debates about the role of literature in a polite modern nation, and tells the story of the resourcefulness with which many writers responded to these pressures. From dream reveries which mocked their own entrepreneurial commitments, such as Oliver Goldsmith's account of selling his work at a 'Fashion Fair' on the frozen Thames, to the Microcosm's mock plan to establish 'a licensed warehouse for wit,' writers insistently tied their literary achievements to a sophisticated understanding of the uncertain complexities of a modern transnational society. This book combines a new understanding of late eighteenth-century literature with the materialist and sociological imperatives of book history and theoretically inflected approaches to cultural history.

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Published by: Diego Morelli on Apr 01, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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08/16/2013

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