Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
6Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Daily Tar Heel for April 2, 2013

The Daily Tar Heel for April 2, 2013

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2,233|Likes:
Published by The Daily Tar Heel
The print edition for April 2, 2013
The print edition for April 2, 2013

More info:

Published by: The Daily Tar Heel on Apr 02, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/02/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Grant/cooperativeagreements
$490,677,743
Sub-awards granted(from UNC)
$113,898,013
Contracts
$21,768,539
Other
$420,042
Serving UNC students and the University community since 1893
Tn  wh sk mk m nis thn tn thusnd wh  sint.
NapoleoN boNaparTe
Tuesday, April 2, 2013
dailytarheel.com
Volume 121, Issue 21
Plans begin for possible new dorm
By Jordan Bailey
Staff Writer
Come fall of 2015, studentsmight have a new option forhousing.Rick Bradley, assistantdirector of the Departmentof Housing and ResidentialEducation, said the University  will build a facility to replaceOdum Village apartments, which will close due to a build-ing code that requires all resi-dence halls to have sprinklers. Administrators hope to openthe building somewhere nearSouth Campus by the fall of 2015, when Odum will no lon-ger be a housing option.Bradley said there are noplans to demolish Odum Villageunless administrators opt to build the new residence hall inthe place of one of its buildings. Anna Wu, assistant vicechancellor of facilities opera-tions, planning and construction,said Odum Village will likely berepurposed once the new resi-dence hall opens and will not beused for student housing.The last new residence hallconstructed on campus wasRam Village, which was com-pleted in 2006.Dianne Bachman, assistantdirector of facilities planning,said administrators are stillin the early stages of planningthe new building, but that they have hired Clark Nexsen, anarchitecture and engineeringfirm, to design the new facility. Wu also said the Board of Trustees hired Clancy & Theys asconstruction manager last week.Bradley said several sites are being considered for the build-ing. He said they include loca-tions on both sides of BlytheDrive, a location in betweenSASB North and the Rams Headparking deck on Ridge Road, anda site between Ehringhaus andKoury residence halls.He also said the facility will be designed similar to the por-tion of Morrison ResidenceHall that features super suitesand is slated to offer 500 beds.It could take multiple sites toachieve that goal, he said.Odum Village currently hasabout 460 beds.Bradley said the occupancy goal is based on a recommen-dation from the Brailsford& Dunlavey consulting firm, which does demand analysis.
By Danielle Herman
Staff Writer
The Carrboro Board of Aldermen could be run-ning out of time if it wants to purchase the conten-tious Collins Crossing Apartment Homes develop-ment on Jones Ferry Road.The board first discussed in January the possibil-ity of buying the complex, using the eminent domainclause of the Constitution, as a way to preserveaffordable housing — but a proposed amendment tothe North Carolina Constitution could threaten itsauthority to do so. Aldermen have said they want to protect CollinsCrossing residents from unfair practices, includingrising rents and the failure of the complex’s manage-ment to take care of stairwells. Aspen Square Management, the managementcompany for Collins Crossing, could not be reachedfor comment Monday.In January, the N.C. General Assembly draftedHouse Bill 8, which would prohibit governmentsfrom purchasing private property except for publicuse, such as to create a parking lot.North Carolina’s current statute states that privateproperty may also be purchased for public benefit— as would be the case with Collins Crossing — butHouse Bill 8 would remove that ability.The amendment will be voted on in a statewidereferendum on Nov. 4, 2014.Mike Brough, the town attorney for Carrboro, saidthe language of the proposed amendment is confus-ing, and its impact is not yet clear.“It raises the question as to whether or not thegovernment can only condemn property if the publicis going to use it,” he said.“I think the impact of that proposed constitutionalamendment is not entirely clear. Alderman Sammy Slade said the process of con-demning property is already lengthy and complicat-
Collins Crossingpurchase could be prohibited
UNC failed to addressharassment,says judge
The new residence hallwould replace OdumVillage apartments.House Bill 8 would limit governmentpurchases of private property.
By Jordan Bailey
Staff Writer
On Thursday, an administrative judge ruled infavor of a UNC housekeeper who has complained of sexual harassment and discrimination by her super- visor and department director. After considering 125 findings of fact, Melissa Owens Lassiter wrote in her decision that theUniversity failed to provide Maria Isabel Prudencio- Arias with a work environment freeof discrimination and retaliation.Lassiter also said theUniversity acted arbitrarily inapplying its Policy on ProhibitedHarassment and Discrimination by failing to immediately respondto her harassment claims.The decision will be sent to a State Personnel Commission that will review the ruling and make final decision on the case.Prudencio-Arias’ lawyer AlMcSurely said his client beganexperiencing sexual harassmentat work in 2009 with the hiring of a new supervisor.McSurely said Prudencio-Arias successfully gotthis supervisor fired by using a tape recorder as evi-dence of harassment against her.She then began experiencing retaliation andharassment from the department’s director, who nolonger works at UNC, McSurely said.In September 2011, a consulting firm UNC hiredprovided more than 45 suggestions for improvingthe department following claims of mistreatment of housekeepers by management.Darius Dixon assumed the position as head of theembattled department in April 2012. He could not be reached for comment Monday. According to Lassiter’s conclusions, Prudencio- Arias was targeted for reporting her first supervisor.She was transferred to work in the residence halls without notice, assigned more work and required toperform work that exceeded her medical restrictions.Prudencio-Arias said she was forced to get on herhands and knees and clean the floor of a men’s bath-
Fishing
f
funding
UNC-system lobbyists fight to preservefederal research money
The firm considers the styleof housing that students areinterested in, the most likely student populations to live inthe facility based on age andacademic classification, the sitelocation and the price point.It then determines what thedemand for a particular hous-ing location would be.Bachman said renovationsto housing facilities happenconstantly.“I understand housing is on a schedule where there’s continu-ous maintenance,” she said.“There’s never a year ora summer when they’re notimproving a residential build-ing or community.”Bradley said this summerEhringhaus, Hinton Jamesand Parker residence halls willundergo interior room and bathroom renovations.
Contact the desk editor at university@dailytarheel.com.
By Jacob Rosenberg
Staff Writer
Last year, 71 percent of researchfunding for UNC-CH came from thefederal government.Tuition rates continue to rise, andmore students are turning to federalprograms such as Pell grants and work-study to help pay for college.But federal cuts through the budgetprocess of sequestration have jeopar-dized federal funding for these pro-grams — including university research. What the federal government doesaffects students throughout the UNC sys-tem, said Bradley Ballou, director of fed-eral government relations for the system.“We’re up here to ensure fundingstreams remain where they are,” hesaid. “Think of an $8 billion corpora-tion with 40,000 employees and 17 dif-ferent offices. They’re going to have aninterest on the federal level.”
Hw ds ying wk?
Ballou, a UNC-Wilmington alum-nus, is one of a few lobbyists advo-cating for UNC-system interests in Washington, D.C.Most of his time is spent on a num- ber of tasks, including talking with theN.C. Congressional delegation, actingas a liaison to larger higher educationorganizations and advocating for theUNC system on a myriad issues.“There’s really not a typical day,” hesaid.In the last few years, UNC-systemlobbyists have spent significant timeadvocating for legislation on cancerresearch, veterans affairs and even a 2011 bill to save great apes.The UNC system, unlike mostlobbying operations, legally cannotdonate money to those it lobbies.Ballou said this puts the system in a special role.“Higher education is all too oftenan afterthought when legislation isdrafted,” he said. “We view ourselves asprimarily advocates and educators.” While the system as a whole cannotcontribute money, individual systememployees often donate on the federallevel, with no explicit connections touniversities. According to campaign financedata, UNC-CH employees and theirfamilies donated more than $80,000to President Barack Obama’s campaignand more than $15,000 to that of U.S.Rep. David Price, D-N.C., in 2011-12.
See
HOUSEKEEPER,
Page 7See
COLLINS CROSSING,
Page 7See
FUNDING,
Page 7
Maria IsabelPrudencio-Arias
climd sh ws thobjct of rtlitionnd hrssmnt bysuprvisors.
A judge ruled Thursday in favor of aUniversity housekeeper.
Potential residence hall locations
The Department of Housing and Residential Education is looking at three sites on South Campus.
1.
Near Rams Head Deck
2.
Near Ehringhaus
3.
O William Blythe Drive by Odum Village
SOURCE: RICK BRADLEY, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF HOUSING AND RESIDENTIAL EDUCATIONDTH/MEREDITH BURNS 
             S               k              i          p             p             e          r              B          o           w               l          e          s              D          r              i           v          e
M   
a    n    
n    
i    n    g   
 
D     
r        
i       v      
e      
BoshamerStadiumEhringhausKouryHintonJames
 I. .I I
MorrisonSASBCraigeRam VillageRam Village
123
Odum Village
  H
  i
   b
   b
   a
    r
   d
      D
       r
             i
        v
         e
W  
i  
l  
l  
i  
 
h
e
 
D
r
i
v
e
Grant/cooperative agreements
are funding opportunities open toresearchers nationwide.
70.4%
funds used for research
 S    O   U  R   C   e    :   U  N   C    O  F   F   I     C   e    O  F   F   e    D  e   R  a  L   a  F   F   a  I    R   S    D  T   H   /    C   e    C   e   P  a   S    C    U  a  L   a  N   D  K  e   V  I    N   U  H  R  a   C   H  e   R  
Sub-awards granted
are funds the University gets for collabo-rating on research projects.
72.6%
funds used for research
Contracts
are agreements with the government forthe creation of specific products.
77.1%
funds used for research
Other
includes funding options for organizedresearch and sponsored activities.
96.2%
funds used for research
 The circles represent total amounts of federal fundingUNC-CH received in fiscal year 2012. The percentagesbelow show how much of each funding type theUniversity allocates for research.
 
 
Someone committed a strong-arm robbery at 100 W. Rosemary St. at 3:30 a.m.Sunday, according to ChapelHill police reports.Stolen items included a $2,000 Rolex watch, $73in cash and three PoliceBenevolent Association cards, valued at $1 each, reportsstate.
 
Someone reported a suspicious person on MorganCreek Trail at 4:07 p.m.Sunday, according to ChapelHill police reports.The person reported beingfollowed by someone on a  bike, reports state.
 
Someone disturbed thepeace at the Days Inn at 1312Fordham Blvd. at 9:45 a.m.Sunday, according to ChapelHill police reports.The person was intoxicatedand caused a disturbance,reports state. The subject alsodamaged a fire extinguisher valued at $50, according toreports.
 
Someone vandalized theChapel of the Cross church at304 E. Franklin St. between9:30 a.m. and 10:53 a.m.Sunday, according to ChapelHill police reports.The person spray paintedgraffiti on the side of thechurch, causing damages valued at $50, police reportsstate.
 
Someone vandalized a  vehicle at 738 Pritchard Ave. between 3:30 a.m. and 3:45a.m. Sunday, according toChapel Hill police reports.The person keyed the driv-er’s side of the 2007 ChryslerPacifica, causing an estimated$665 in damages, reportsstate.The person also caused$100 in damages to the pas-senger side mirror and brokea tail light valued at $300,according to reports.
To make a calendar submission,email calendar@dailytarheel.com. Please include the date of the event in the subject line, and attach a photo if you wish. Eventswill be published in the newspaper on either the day or the day beforethey take place.
POLICE LOG
News
Tuesday, April 2, 2013
The Daily Tar Heel
2
COrrECtIOns
• The Dily Tr Heel reports y iccurte iormtio published s soo s the error is discovered.• Editoril correctios will be prited o this pe. Errors committed o the Opiio Pe hve correctiosprited o tht pe. Correctios lso re oted i the olie versios o our stories.• Cotct Mi Editor Elise You t mi.editor@dilytrheel.com with issues bout this policy.
www.dailytarheel.com
 Established 1893
120 years of editorial freedom
The Daily Tar Heel
ANdy thomAsoN
EDITORInCHIEf
editor@dailytarheel.com
elise youNg
 
ManagIng EDITOR
 
managing.editor@dailytarheel.com
AllisoN russell
VISUaL ManagIng EDITOR
visuals@dailytarheel.com
sArAh gleN
 
DIRECTOR Of EnTERPRISE
enterprise@dailytarheel.com
Nicole compArAto
UnIVERSITY EDITOR
university@dailytarheel.com
 
chelsey dulANey
CITY EDITOR
city@dailytarheel.com
dANiel wiser
STaTE & naTIOnaL EDITOR
 
state@dailytarheel.com
brANdoN moree
SPORTS EDITOR
sports@dailytarheel.com
cArsoN blAcKwelder
aRTS EDITOR
arts@dailytarheel.com
AllisoN hussey
DIVERSIOnS EDITOR
diversions@dailytarheel.com
KeviN uhrmAcher
DESIgn & gRaPHICS EDITOR
design@dailytarheel.com
KAtie sweeNey
PHOTO EDITOR
photo@dailytarheel.com
colleeN m
c
eNANey
MULTIMEDIa EDITOR
 
multimedia@dailytarheel.com
lAurie beth hArris
COPY EDITOR
copy@dailytarheel.com
dANiel pshocK
OnLInE EDITOR
 
online@dailytarheel.com
pAulA seligsoN
SPECIaL PROjECTS ManagER
special.projects@dailytarheel.com
Cotct Mi EditorElise You tmi.editor@dilytrheel.com with ews tips, commets,correctios or suestios.
tIPs
Mil d Oice: 151 E. Rosemry St.Chpel Hill, nC 27514
ady Thomso, Editor-i-Chie, 962-4086advertisig & Busiess, 962-1163news, fetures, Sports, 962-0245
Oe copy per perso;dditiol copies my be purchsedt The Dily Tr Heel or $.25 ech.Plese report suspicious ctivity tour distributio rcks by emiligdth@dilytrheel.com© 2013 DTH Medi Corp.all rights reserved
Noted.
How to market tothe American public: It’sas simple as green meansgo, red means stop. A new study shows that whencandy packs have greenlabels instead of red, peo-ple snatch ‘em up, think-ing, “Ooh! Healthy!”
Quoted.
“There is no way that this is about equality …it’s all about a free ride.”— The chairwoman of Georgia’s GOP says same-sex marriage is just a toolfor tax benefits (becauseonly people of the same sex would marry for those).
 W 
e had really hoped this was im-plicitly understood, but appar-ently not: Just ‘being yourself’isn’t a ticket to your dreamcollege, simple as that. Sorry, Suzy Lee Weiss. Weiss wrote an op-ed in the Wall Street Jour-nal bemoaning the rejection she got from herdream school, blaming the world for telling herto be herself and then not kissing her feet whenshe indulged her lazy princess fantasy and didn’t,in her words, “start a fake charity” or have “twomoms.” Yeah,
that’s
why you didn’t get in.
justice served
from st d wire reports
DAILY DOSE
editoriAl stAff
 
Aan e:
josephieYurcb,
arts 
; Cmmie Bellmy,Ktie Reilly, jey Sure,
city; 
 
Mris Dinovis, Kelsey Erdossy,Kevi Phiey,
copy; 
aroMoore, Cece Pscul, Biley Seitter,
design & graphics; 
ElizbethByrum,
diversions 
; Deli D’ambr,
multimedia; 
Sem Kbc,
opinion; 
Chris Cowy, MelissKey, Chloe Stepheso,
photog- raphy; 
Hery gr, jothLMti, Brooke Pryor,
sports; 
 
amd albriht, Clire Willims,
state & national; 
Me Cssell,Liz Crmpto, Emily Overcrsh,
university 
A:
Srh a, Elizbeth Bker, Tt’y Berd, gbriell Cirelli,Lure Clrk, McKezie Coey, Mryfeddem, Edmod Hrriso,Mdelie Hurley, Bre Kerr,Rebecc Pollck, Smth Sbi,Dvid Scrisbrick, jmes Smith,Elizbeth Tew, avery Thompso
cy:
Mriss Be, ElizbethBrthol, ady Brdshw, RchelButt, Tyler Cly, juli Crve,jey Drbble, Sm fletcher,grves gzert, Dielle Herm,Crolie Hudso, Corie jurey,Pie Ldisic, jsmi Sih, ClireSmith, Dlish Sturdivt, gytriSuredrth, grce Ttter,Kthry Trodo, Thompso Wll,Holly West, Corie White
cy:
Mriss Brblto, CtherieCheey, adrew Cri, MdelieErdossy, alde Hle, Tr jeries,Me Kezih, Rchel Lier,Sydey Leord, Crrie Lisle,Sbri Mrcos, Mddie Mtusich,Kthrie Mcarey, BlkeMesserly, austi Powell, LeelRo, Krystie Lee Reichert, DilloRobiso, Cmpbell Smith, alliso Turer, amuly Upplpti, MrthUpto, Emily Whitso, BrookeWilso, Hether Wilso
dn & gah:
Kthryaute, Olivi Bley, MelissBorde, Meredith Burs, MeClwes, ncy Copeld, SrhDelk, Hh Dokssky, Olivifrere, nicole guthreux, DelleHerm, Rchel Holt, jeierjckso, Tr jeries, a Kim,allie Kowles, jessic Milber,Ktie Perkiso, Cssie Schutzer,avery Thompso
dvn:
alexdriabe, Tess Boyle, Lm Chu,alex Dixo, Lizzie goodell, Roccogimtteo, Olivi frley, amdHyes, Bo McMill, MbllMedou, Chris Powers, jyPrevtt, The Ry, Chrlie Shelto,jeremy Wile
ma:
ChristopherBtchelder, abiil Brewer, KyleeBrow, Tyler Cooy, Lily f,Ree gupt, alliso Hies,Clire Hubble, jocely ji, adriMcLuri, Kylie Piper, EboyShmberer, , Mry Wurzelm
onn:
nyb Kh, TreyMum, Mtt Okes, KreemRmd, Ptrick Ry, CodyWelto, Sierr Wite-Bey,
edito- rial board 
; Zi alsous, StewrtBoss, Srh Buki, MichelDickso, Srh Edwrds, averiHrper, Everett Lozzi, jir Ptel,Memet Wlker,
columnists; 
RyCocc, guile Cotrers, Ptrick Eckerd, Mtt Lemi, DielMdriz, Virii niver, ScottSimoto, Mrk Viser,
cartoonists 
ph:
Ktie Biley, Eri Hull,
senior photographers; 
Chelseyallder, aish awr, CristiBrlett, Isbell Brtolucci, MddiBrtley, Molly Cobur, KthleeDoyle, Simoe Duvl, Silvgoberdh-Vile, Becc goldstei,Kir gurus, Specer Herlo,Kevi Hu, Kitly Kelly, jessieLowe, Kki Pope, justi Pryor,Brookely Riley, Lo Sve,Hlle Siott, Tylor Sweet, Krl Towle, nivi Umskr, KtieWillims, jso Woloick 
s:
Michel L, KellyPrsos,
senior writers; 
Dvid adler,Brdo Chse, Crlos Collzo,aro Dodso, Kte Estm,Emily fedew, Robbie Hrms,Dyl Howlett, Mtthew Lurio,Wesley Lim, Lo Mrtiez,Lidsy Msi, Mx Miceli, MrilyPye, grce Ryor, Hley Rhye,adrew Romie, Be Slkeld,adrew Tie, Mdiso Wy, DielWilco
sa & Nana:
Mdelie Will,
senior writer;
Kelly aderso,Clire Beett, Srh Brow,Meredith Burs, adrew Edwrds,Hyley fowler, Eric grci, johHowell, gbriell Kostrzew, jcobRoseber, Lucid She, CrolieStephes, Clire Strickld, jmes Thorpe, amy Tsi
unvy:
Melvi Bckm,Citli McCbe,
senior writers; 
jord Biley, jke Brch, nomiBum-Crbrey, Elle Blck,Mry frces Buoyer, Emily Byrd, Trevor Csey, Tyler Cooy, ResitCox, Victor De L Cruz, MrisDinovis, Brooke Eller, Lilli Evs,Zchry freshwter, Lure gil,Srh Hedley, Elizbeth Kemp,jckso Kpp, Crolie Leld,Kthrie Mcarey, jessic new,Srh niss, Pol Perdomo, TryRothstei, Sm Scheer, RchelSchmitt, Rdy Short, Kriste Skill,jell Smith, nel Smith, Huter Toro, Hiley Vest, Hley Wxm,ady Willrd, Lysy Willims
pn aan:
ClireMcneill
Nw av:
Eric Perel
ea pn:
Stcy Wy,
manager 
 
pnn:
 Trile Web Priti Co.
dn:
nick d SrhHmmods.
 The Dily Tr Heel is published by the DTH Medi Corp.,  oproit north Croli corportio,Mody throuh fridy, ccordi to the Uiversity cledr. Cllers with questios bout billi ordisply dvertisi should cll 962-1163 betwee 8:30 .m. d 5 p.m. Clssiied ds c be rechedt 962-0252. Editoril questios should be directed to 962-0245.
office
:
151 E. Rosemry St.
u.s. mAil Address:
P.O. Box 3257,Chpel Hill, nC 27515-3257
bn an Avn:
KeviSchwrtz,
director/general man- ager; 
Reee Hwley,
advertising director 
 ; 
Lis Reichle,
business manager 
; Sllie Ki,
advertising manager; 
Hh Peterso,
social media manager 
 
c sv:
Tylor Hrtley, Trici Seitzer, Dielle Stephesod aeshi Tii,
representatives 
day Avn:
Daderso, Molly Bll, TylorBriders, Devi Cooey, fireDvidso, Emm getry, amdgurki, ashley joyer, Dyl McCue,geore Moore, jord Philips,ashto Rtclie, Kerry Steirberd Mrrethe Willims,
account executives; 
Eth Butler, ZeDuer, Mris Du, Dvid E,Ktherie feruso, austi Helms,Srh jckso, Victori Krioris,nicole Leord, Dvid Pecui,Hley Ross d alex Wlkowski,
 
assistant account executives.
makn ta:
Kthry Kiht,
manager; 
 
Becky Bush, SuzhDvidso, a Dillo, Stellgrder, jmes geer, Srh aRhodes, Reddi Wltz d austiWhite;
teammembers
da Avn:
nick Ludlow,
manager.
Avn pn:
PeyPersos,
manager 
; Beth O’Brie,
digital 
 
ad production manager; 
Chelse Myse, Ev noll d PieWrmus,
assistants; 
Huter Lewis,
 
classified production assistant.
professioNAl ANd busiNess stAff
ISN #10709436
The Daily Tar Heel
tOday
uNc . Aaaan sa:
 
 The north Croli sotbll temtkes o the Moutieers.
t:
5 p.m.
lan:
aderso Stdium
‘can i’ nn ann:
film screei ddiscussio with the lm’s direc-tor/producer d  UnC eolo-icl scieces proessor. The lmollows  photorpher’s tripto the arctic to documet theerth’s chi climte. Wiero  Sudce film festivl 2012Excellece i Ciemtorphyawrd. Reistrtio required:o.uc.edu/ChsiIce.
t:
5:30 p.m.
lan:
nelso Mdel audi-torium, fedEx globl EductioCeter
pan :
Pul Ptto o the Uiversity o new SouthWles ives  ree, public tlk ofoucult d Rwls d their di-ereces i politicl philosophy.
t:
4 p.m.
lan:
Uiversity Room,Hyde Hll
COMMUnIty CaLEndar
bk san in:
Meet or discussio o “Stte o Woder”by a Ptchett. free d opeto the public. Bri  sdwichor luch d eoy the discus-sio led by arlee grew.
t:
11:30 .m.
lan:
flyle Books
GET THE SCOOP ON UPCOMING PERFORMANCES AND EXCLUSIVE PREMIERES,BUY TICKETS, AND GO BEHIND-THE-SCENES WITH THE ARTISTS ATTHERITEOFSPRINGAT100.ORG919.843.3333
REINVENTING
THE RITE OF SPRING 
UNC’S GERRARD HALL
SUNDAY APRIL 7 
U
7:00 PM
 //
 FREE
Carolina Performing Arts is pleased to present a conversationwith Basil Twist, one of the most creative performers incontemporary theater. Twist will discuss his body of work,his creative process and some of the magic behind his grandreimagining of 
The Rite of Spring
, premiering at Memorial Hallon April 12 and 13.
HE’S GOTTHE WORLDON A STRING.
LOOKING AT
THE RITE OF SPRING 
 THROUGH THE EYES OF A PUPPETEER.
GET THE SCOOP ON UPCOMING PERFORMANCES AND EXCLUSIVE PREMIERES,BUY TICKETS, AND GO BEHIND-THE-SCENES WITH THE ARTISTS ATTHERITEOFSPRINGAT100.ORG919.843.3333
NEDERLANDSDANS THEATER 1
 
“...exhilaratingly talented dancers”
 WED, APRIL 3
U
7:30 PMFRI, APRIL 5
U
8:00 PM
Carolina Performing Arts presents two evenings withcontemporary dance giants Nederlands Dans Theater 1.The first performance features the U.S. premiere of 
Chamber
co-commissioned by Carolina Performing Arts. The secondincludes a collaboration with Merge Records’ indie rocklegends the Magnetic Fields.
Student tickets $10.
LEGENDS OFTHE STAGE,
AND SOME LOCALLEGENDS TOO.
 
News
Tuesday, April 2, 2013
The Daily Tar Heel
3
City brief
Chapel Hill-Carrboro YMCA calls forapplications for volunteer task force
The Chapel Hill-Carrboro YMCA is seekingcommunity members to join a new volunteer task force.The group will contribute ideas for the redesignof the Y’s Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard facil-ity.The Y’s Board of Directors was recently criti-cized for its decision to remove the facility’s rac-quetball courts.The task force is being formed to help ensurefurther community opinions are addressedthroughout the facility’s redesign process and the best possible options are put into place.Those interested in joining the board can signup via this link by April 15: bit.ly/XDOVpa.
CAMPUS brief
Phi Beta Kappa honor society inducts144 new members from the University
Phi Beta Kappa, the oldest honorary society inthe United States, recently inducted 144 UNC stu-dents into UNC’s Alpha of North Carolina chapterof the society.To be eligible, students must be undergraduatesin college or professional degree programs.Inductees must either have 75 hours of course- work completed with a grade point average of 3.85 or 105 hours of coursework completed in theliberal arts and sciences with a grade point aver-age of 3.75.Less than 1 percent of all college students quali-fy for the honorary society.Of the 144 students inducted, 90 were fromNorth Carolina, 44 were from out of state. Tennew inductees chose not to release their informa-tion.Phi Beta Kappa has 280 chapters nationwide.
— From staff and wire reports
in
BRIEF
dth/isabella bartolucci
North Carolina freshman Landon Lassiter takes a lead off first base in the first inning of UNC’s 5-4 home loss to Clemson Monday night.
NO SWEEP FOR UNC
baseball: Clemson 5, north Carolina 4 (f/11)
Pg upvwudg
By Holly West
Staff Writer
 A new program in Chapel Hill is aimed at lettingprospective businesses know exactly what they’regetting into before they commit to a space.Look Before You Lease! — which is beingoffered by the Chapel Hill Fire Department andInspections Division — gives potential ChapelHill business owners the chance to learn aboutstructural issues with their space before they signa lease. As part of the process, town officials walk through the building with the business owner anddo an “eyes-only” inspection.Joseph Ayscue, former chief building inspectorfor the Chapel Hill Public Works Department,said the town has offered the service informally for several years. He said town officials recently decided to formalize the program.Meg McGurk, executive director of the ChapelHill Downtown Partnership, said the partnership began discussing how to better publicize theprogram with the town in November or December.“They said, ‘This is a service. Let’s market it as a resource,’” McGurk said.Town spokeswoman Catherine Lazorko saidthe town occasionally receives complaints from business owners about their leased spaces, and theprogram will help address these concerns.“Some facilities are suited for a particular typeof business,” she said. “An early overview can give a potential businessperson the feedback they need intheir process.”Oscar Morales, manager of the recently-closedPepper’s Pizza restaurant on Franklin Street,said the Pepper’s building has had some leakingproblems, but nothing serious.“It wasn’t bad enough to fail inspection,” he said.“It was because the ducts of the air conditioning.Bruce Knott, chief operating officer for thedevelopers of The Courtyard development on WestFranklin Street, said his company didn’t have any problems with its property.“As developers, the first thing we do is make sureeverything is up to code,” he said. “I can imagine forsome smaller spaces, somebody may sign a lease without doing much improvement to it. But usually the lease provides that degree of protection.” While some potential Franklin Street businessesmight have concerns about their buildings,McGurk said Look Before You Lease! wasn’tcreated in response to a particular problem.“This is just a way for us to make it better for businesses,” she said. “The idea is that it saveseverybody money and time in the long run.Lazorko said helping businesses is one of themain interests of the town.“I think we are showing that we are business-friendly in downtown.”
Contact the desk editor at city@dailytarheel.com.
a w v w w pc  pc  cg.
No. 1 Tar Heels split doubleheader with Clemson
By Jonathan LaMantia
Assistant Sports Editor
 At 25-2, the No. 1 North Carolina base- ball team sometimes looks like it has thegame all figured out.But after clinching the series againstClemson with a 6-2 win in the opening-game of Monday’s doubleheader, it wasthe fundamentals that led to UNC’ssecond loss of the season in the finaleMonday night — a 5-4 Clemson win in 11innings.“We didn’t play well enough in the sec-ond game in all phases of the game,” UNCcoach Mike Fox said.In UNC’s afternoon win, pitcher TrentThornton pitched 6 1/3 innings — theremainder of a game that had been start-ed Sunday night halted by rain — allow-ing two unearned runs and six hits. Warning signs flared up, though, withUNC committing four errors.“Some were mental, some were physi-cal,” first baseman Cody Stubbs said of theerrors. “We pride on our defense and it’snot something that usually happens withus, but we’ll get right back on track withthat.”In the finale, a Colin Moran opposite-field bomb gave UNC a 2-0 lead in thethird inning, and the Tar Heels took a 3-2lead in the fifth.But the trouble started in the sixthinning, when Clemson’s Thomas Brittle blooped a single in front of freshman SkyeBolt with the bases loaded. Bolt threw the ball toward third base, allowing a secondrun to score on the play, which tied thegame 3-3.It was exactly the type of inning Foxtells his team to avoid — what he calls the‘big inning.’ Fox added that the team thathas the big inning usually takes the game.Clemson would take its first lead of theseries when UNC relief pitcher TrevorKelley threw a wild pitch, scoring TylerKrieger for a 4-3 Clemson lead.UNC answered in the seventh whenMoran tied the game hard-hit groundoutto the pitcher, which scored Chaz Frank.That would be UNC’s last run of theseries, as Clemson reliever Scott Firthshut the Tar Heels down for the next 42/3 innings.In the 11th inning, when a leadoff walk 
looK before YoU lease!
Inspections Division:
919-968-2718
For more information about the program:
bit.ly/XUekXz
INSIDE:
  Turn to page 5 to read about the UNCbullpen’s collapse in the second game.
and two bunt singles loaded the bases forthe Tigers with no outs, catcher GarrettBoulware sent the eventual winning runacross the plate with a groundout.“That really changed the momentum,said relief pitcher Chris O’Brien, whotook the loss. “We did a good job trying to battle through it and just didn’t come outon top this time.” With two runners on base in the bot-tom of the inning, freshman LandonLassiter fouled out on a bunt attempt.Firth retired Moran and Bolt and the TarHeels went to the clubhouse on the losingend for just the second time this season.“Two very simple things — we don’tthrow the ball to the right base and wedon’t get the bunt down,” Fox said. “They  just happened to be our freshmen thathave been in the lineup. That’s part of it,it’s a learning process … two very simplethings can lose you games.”
Contact the desk editor at sports@dailytarheel.com.
Charter school plans put on hold
By Marissa Bane
Staff Writer
Danita Mason-Hogans has spent morethan two years trying to open the Howard& Lillian Lee Scholars Charter School inCarrboro.But her efforts hit a roadblock earlier thismonth when the charter school’s partner-ship with National Heritage Academies fellthrough, halting plans to open the school, which was originally slated to open in August.National Heritage Academies had com-mitted to provide the school with man-agement services, such as marketing andrecruiting, but backed out on March 19 dueto a conflict over land.“The NHA told us they could not work  with us anymore because of land acquisitionproblems,” said Mason-Hogans, vice-chairwoman of the school’s board.“We wanted to lease land for the school,
lee Charter sChool
 
April 13, 2012:
The Howard & Lillian LeeScholars Charter school board submittedits application to the North Carolina StateBoard of Education. 
Sept. 6, 2012:
The State Board of Education gave the school preliminaryapproval. 
March 14:
The school got its charter. 
March 19:
National Heritage Academiesbacked out of the partnership.
By Sam Schaefer
Staff Writer
Launch, a new student organizationdedicated to helping high school studentsmake the transition to college, began with conversation.Sophomores Manhas Narra and Frank  Wu, co-founders of the group along withsophomore Abby Dennison, discussed theirshared concern about the achievement gapand brainstormed ways to help.“A lot of first-generation college studentsand underrepresented minorities comingout of these high schools are getting intocolleges — that’s not necessarily the issue,” Wu said.“There’s a lot of programs to helpthem get into college, but the problem isretention — them staying in college and notdropping out.”Dennison, Narra and Wu came up witha two-pronged curriculum to make thetransition to college smoother.The group was awarded a Robert E.Bryan Social Innovation Fellowship — which included a $1,500 grant, instructionand a supply of contacts — to help thegroup begin operations. Wu said the first aspect of the curriculum would be workshops for students from the Advancement Via Individual Determinationprogram — which helps minority studentsget accepted to college — in ChathamCounty and Orange County high schools.The workshops will brief students on dif-ferent aspects of the college application andtransition process, such as college applica-tion essay writing, applying for financial aidand adjusting to living with a roommate.Narra said the group is currently test-ing out the workshops with AVID studentsfrom Carrboro High School in hopes of implementing the program in Chatham andOrange County schools in the fall.The second aspect of the curriculuminvolves providing contacts and mentorsfor the AVID students beyond their schoolcounselors.Narra said he was tutoring students atCarrboro High School when he had the idea for the mentorship aspect of the group.“I met students who were always talkingabout how their counselors didn’t really havetime for them and how they wished they knew more about the process, so that really got me thinking about Launch,” he said.He said the organization is looking torecruit volunteers. Interested students canapply on the group’s website.Dennison said she was personally inspired to co-found the group because of a passion for education.“I care a lot about education. Both of my parents are teachers,” she said.“For me, it’s really about connecting withthose students personally to help them con-nect them with what I’ve grown up with.”
Contact the desk editor at university@dailytarheel.com.
t c  C w p  augu  pd.
 but the NHA’s expectations differed fromours, which is why they pulled out of thepartnership.” Without the help of National Heritage Academies, plans for the Lee CharterSchool — which aims to close the racialachievement gap —have been put on hold.Nick Paradiso, vice president of government relations and partner servicesfor National Heritage Academies, said in a March 19 press release that the organizationadmires everyone who tried to get theschool started.“It has been our privilege to work withthem,” Paradiso said.Despite the setback, Joel Medley, directorof the N.C. Board of Education’s Office of Charter Schools, said the board’s focus hasnot changed.“The board has indicated that they arestill committed to opening the school inCarrboro,” Medley said.The six-person board, made up entirely of volunteers, remains intact.“Our goal is to produce a quality productfor the families of Chapel Hill, which is what everyone on the school’s board is very passionate about,” Mason-Hogans said.The board is in the process of making a concrete plan for what the next steps should be for the school.“The loss of the partnership has been a difficult stumbling block, but we don’t seeit as the end to our efforts,” Mason-Hoganssaid.
Contact the desk editor at city@dailytarheel.com.
t gup’ g    cg  pc.
Launch aims to help first-generation students

Activity (6)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
Chris Harrow liked this
Kelsey Bergfors liked this
Emily Simon liked this
bichitavet liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->