Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Half of Seniors Are Dying in Hospitals: Study

Half of Seniors Are Dying in Hospitals: Study

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1|Likes:
Published by EvidenceNetwork.ca
Most seniors say they want to die at home. However, about half of seniors are dying in hospitals, according to recent research by Verena Menec, the Director of the University of Manitoba’s Centre on Aging. She says many of these patients don’t need to die in the hospital. They could be dying in more comf ortable settings if we had the
services to provide them. But of ten, we don’t.
Most seniors say they want to die at home. However, about half of seniors are dying in hospitals, according to recent research by Verena Menec, the Director of the University of Manitoba’s Centre on Aging. She says many of these patients don’t need to die in the hospital. They could be dying in more comf ortable settings if we had the
services to provide them. But of ten, we don’t.

More info:

Published by: EvidenceNetwork.ca on Apr 02, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Share Alike

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/13/2013

pdf

text

original

 
umanitoba.ca
http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/8693
Half of seniors are dying in hospitals, study
 A version of this article was published in the Huffington Post 
Most seniors say they want to die at home. However,about half of seniors are dying in hospitals, according torecent research by Verena Menec, the Director of theUniversity of Manitoba’s Centre on Aging. She says manyof these patients don’t need to die in the hospital. Theycould be dying in more comfortable settings if we had theservices to provide them. But often, we don’t.Menec, who is also an expert with EvidenceNetwork.ca,says hospital care isn’t structured to treat frail, elderlypatients with chronic illnesses. “It’s very stressful to theperson who is dying in that setting but it can also be verystressful for the family,” Menec says. Many patientsbounce in and out of emergency rooms several times at the end of their lives.“Imagine a 90-year-old person, coming in, frail, confused. They’re coming through an emergency departmentand they die in an emergency department. There’s no family, there’s that whole bustle of the emergencydepartment,” Menec says. “I think that’s really sad.”Dr. Louise Coulombe provides that care. She drives around the city delivering palliative services to patients intheir homes. Back at her Ottawa office, the computerized management system calls out the names opatients who are due for a visit. The cold, digital voice contrasts with Coulombe’s description of her verypersonal interaction with patients.“You basically see people in four dimensions at home. You walk in and immediately you know they’redifferent from everybody else. You see them in depth, not just where they are now but where they havebeen.”Coulombe gets into her car to visit 89-year-old Russell Peacock, a man with thyroid cancer who lives alonein a small bungalow. Coulombe calls him a great talker. As soon as she arrives he launches into a story. “Oh Ihad a terrible day today. Yesterday I mean. I went shopping with my brother … He was exhausted and so amI.Coulombe interrupts his tale repeatedly totell him to sit down, not to tire himself out further.Peacock could live from three months to six months or more.“Well here I am. I don’t know how long it’ll be but I don’t care. You just live it day by day anyway. You know?Live everything day by day.He’s lived in this house since shortly after he returned from serving in theSecond World War. He still remembers the date he moved in, October thirtieth, nineteen forty seven.“Fifty-four years I’ve been here. Oh jeez, imagine that. A whole life gone.” Peacock’s wife, Vera, died here andthis is where he’d like to stay. “So we stayed here and I’m still here. Still keeping me in my house. Between thedoctors there and palliative care I can handle it, you know?” he says, laughing.Dr. Coulombe says our medical system is slowly changing to accommodate practices like hers.“We started to feel that we could conquer death and we’re learning, in the last fifteen, thirty years that we

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->