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Tropicália & the Evolutionary Line in Brazilian Popular Music

Tropicália & the Evolutionary Line in Brazilian Popular Music

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Published by Alec Quig
Master's thesis submitted to the Tulane University Stone Center for Latin American Studies in May 2012.

In 1966, Caetano Veloso, musician and co-founder of the tropicália movement, publicly referred to the need within Brazilian popular music to “recapture the evolutionary line.” His statement hearkened to the musical tradition in Brazil initiated by samba, continuing through bossa nova, and leading to tropicália and beyond. The tropicalist movement is this thesisʼ main focus, and within I seek a comprehensive understanding of the movement in relation to this formulation of an “evolutionary line.”
Master's thesis submitted to the Tulane University Stone Center for Latin American Studies in May 2012.

In 1966, Caetano Veloso, musician and co-founder of the tropicália movement, publicly referred to the need within Brazilian popular music to “recapture the evolutionary line.” His statement hearkened to the musical tradition in Brazil initiated by samba, continuing through bossa nova, and leading to tropicália and beyond. The tropicalist movement is this thesisʼ main focus, and within I seek a comprehensive understanding of the movement in relation to this formulation of an “evolutionary line.”

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Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: Alec Quig on Apr 04, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/08/2013

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ii
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Acknowledgements: iiiIntroduction: 1Samba, Modernity, and the Evolutionary Line: 9Bossa Nova
ʼ
s First & Second Generations, Iê-iê-iê, & Protest Song: 42Tropicália: 65Post-Tropicália MPB: 99Bibliography: 118Biography: 125
 
iii
Acknowledgements
My three thesis advisors seemed to hover over me while I wrote. ChrisDunn
ʼ
s extraordinary book was among the original catalysts for my interest inBrazilian music, and without his trailblazing work, extensive library, and guidance,this thesis would certainly not exist. Dan Sharp
ʼ
s consistent and subtle emphasison the heterogeneity of music is one of the major themes of this thesis, and hisperspective has continued to shape my broader perception of music. Like thetropicalists discussed in this paper, Matt Sakakeeny
ʼ
s seminar on theinterrelation of music and politics made me more interested in the latter becauseof how profoundly they influence the former. I can think of no better group ofpeople with whom to study the subject at hand, and would understand little ofBrazilian popular music without their time, generosity, guidance, kindness, humor,and expertise. I am duly indebted to the numerous musical scholars cited herein,each of whom profoundly deepened my understanding of Brazilian culture. Iextend my continued gratitude to Profs. Raymond Hedin, David Ward-Steinman,David Shorter, Edward Gubar, Hannah Hinchman, Robert Schmuhl, and MarkGunty, each of whom offered me invaluable support and encouragement as anundergraduate and beyond. I would finally like to thank my Brazilian family andfriends--the Oukawa family, Guilherme Boechat, and Carolina Jardim—myclassmates and friends at Stone Center--Barbara Carter, Debra Singleton, andJimmy Huck--and finally, my family--I could not ask for a better one.

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