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ELEC_450_SDR_Lab_FINAL.pdf

ELEC_450_SDR_Lab_FINAL.pdf

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Published by Amita Sharma
electrical lab experiment
electrical lab experiment

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Published by: Amita Sharma on Apr 05, 2013
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09/07/2013

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ELEC 450 summer 2012LAB EXPERIMENT 4PRACTICAL QPSK SYSTEM1. Objective
 
Learn about all the necessary stages in a practical QPSK system (transmitter, channel, receiver)that addresses practical issues in wireless communications, such as carrier frequency and phaseoffset, timing offset and frame synchronization.
 
Learn about the bit error rate performance of a QPSK as a function of frequency offset, delay andsignal to noise ratio.
 
Learn about the bit error rate performance of a QPSK wireless link as a function of distance usingthe link budget.
1.1.
 
Lab overview and table of contents
The first part of the lab experiment begins with experiments using Simulink only, the USRP softwaredefined radio units are not used. The experiments run a complete QPSK system with transmitter,simulated channel model (with noise, frequency offset and delay) and receiver implemented in Simulink.The second part uses two USRPs (from adjacent lab stations) to create a complete QPSK system withSimulink transmitter, real RF radio channel with antennas, and Simulink receiver.
QPSK Transmitter and Receiver 
Copyright 2011 The MathWorks, Inc.TransmitterReceiver
Double-clickTo Open Scopes At Run Time
ModelParametersInfo
Double-clickTo Close Scopes
BER DisplayAWGN Channel withFrequency Offset &Variable Time Delay
 
2
1.2.
 
Preparation questions
1.
 
For a QPSK receiver, obtain numerical values for the theoretical bit error rate as a function of Eb/No from 0 to 15 dB (i.e. plot a curve or make a table). For a bit error rate of 
4
10
what isEb/No?2.
 
Find the maximum free space range (distance) that can be covered for a wireless QPSK data linkwith data rate 40 Kbits/sec, bit error rate
4
10
, transmit power one microwatt, antennas withzero gain. Assume the bandwidth is equal to the bit rate and the receiver noise figure is 5 dB.Link budget formulas are in the Appendix.
1.3.
 
Lab table of contents
2.
 
Baseband data transmission2.1.
 
Digital messages2.2.
 
Pulse shaping3.
 
Quadrature Phase Shift Keying3.1.
 
QPSK transmitter theory3.2.
 
Transmitting QPSK in Matlab Simulink 3.2.1.
 
Baseband QPSK signal3.2.2.
 
Real QPSK signal within Simulink 3.2.3.
 
Complex QPSK signal within Simulink 3.2.4.
 
Real QPSK signal at radio frequency (RF)3.3.
 
QPSK receiver 3.3.1.
 
Receiver for complex baseband QPSK signal within Simulink without USRP3.3.2.
 
Receiver for real QPSK signal
 
within Simulink without USRP3.3.3.
 
Receiver for reak QPSK signal at RF using USRP3.3.4.
 
Practical QPSK receiver design challenges4.
 
Lab instructions4.1.
 
Setup at each lab station4.2.
 
Lab instructions overview4.3.
 
QPSK system experiments using Simulink only, USRP not used
 4.3.1.
 
Familiarization with the Simulink QPSK model
 4.3.2.
 
Running the experiment, obtaining BER performance4.3.3.
 
Running the experiment, observing when the system
 breaks
 
4.4.
 
QPSK system experiments using 2 USRPs and antennas4.4.1.
 
Experimental setup with 2 USRPs and antennas4.4.2.
 
Familiarization with USRP transmitter and receiver blocks4.4.3.
 
Running the experiment4.5.
 
Review questionsAppendix
 
3
2. Baseband data transmission
2.1 Digital messages
The figure below shows how a digital message is constructed for a practical QPSK system.The unipolar Barker code is a 13-bit sequence barker=[+1 +1 +1 +1 +1 -1 -1 +1 +1 -1 +1 -1 +1]that has excellent autocorrelation properties, i.e. the matlab command plot(xcorr(barker,barker)) shows a single peak of 13 and sidelobes of 1 or 0.
The Barker code is used as a “unique word” for frame synchronization, i
.e to determine where theinformation bits begin and identify the byte boundaries.
2.2 Pulse shaping
( )
m
is a digital message as shown in the figure below.
Each data frame contains 26 bits header (For Sync Purpose) and 174 bits data bits,first 105 bits contain "Hello world ###" message. Scrambler is there to improve datatransition density and frequency offset estimation.1OutScramblerRepeat2xMessageSource1MatrixConcatenateUnipolarBarker Code

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