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Mapping Salt Reduction Initiatives in the WHO European Region

Mapping Salt Reduction Initiatives in the WHO European Region

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Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading causes of mortality globally, accounting for more deaths than all other causes combined. An urgent development issue, NCDs strike hardest at the world’s low- and middle-income populations, where nearly 80% of NCD-related deaths occur. In order to reduce the growing burden of NCDs, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends reducing salt intake in the general population as a cost-effective strategy. Measures in this direction are considered a “best-buy” approach to preventing NCDs. Salt is a commonly used term referring specifi cally to sodium chloride (5 g salt = 2 g sodium). The positive health impact of reducing an individual’s salt intake is reflected in scientific evidence of a corresponding reduction in blood pressure, among other benefits. Accordingly, WHO recommends a population salt intake level of less than 5 g per person per day for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

Salt intake in most WHO European Region countries is far above the suggested amount. The purpose of this report is to present an up-to-date view of current salt reduction initiatives in WHO European Member States by highlighting activities related to the action points of the relevant global frameworks.

Keywords

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES - prevention and control
DIET, SODIUM-RESTRICTED - utilization
HYPERTENSION - prevention and control
NUTRITION AND FOOD SAFETY
SODIUM CHLORIDE, DIETARY
Address requests about publications of the WHO Regional Offi
ce for Europe to:

Publications WHO Regional Office for Europe
UN City, Marmorvej 51
DK–2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark

Alternatively, complete an online request form for documentation, healthinformation, or for permission to quote or translate, on the Regional Office web site (http://www.euro.who.int/).
Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading causes of mortality globally, accounting for more deaths than all other causes combined. An urgent development issue, NCDs strike hardest at the world’s low- and middle-income populations, where nearly 80% of NCD-related deaths occur. In order to reduce the growing burden of NCDs, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends reducing salt intake in the general population as a cost-effective strategy. Measures in this direction are considered a “best-buy” approach to preventing NCDs. Salt is a commonly used term referring specifi cally to sodium chloride (5 g salt = 2 g sodium). The positive health impact of reducing an individual’s salt intake is reflected in scientific evidence of a corresponding reduction in blood pressure, among other benefits. Accordingly, WHO recommends a population salt intake level of less than 5 g per person per day for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

Salt intake in most WHO European Region countries is far above the suggested amount. The purpose of this report is to present an up-to-date view of current salt reduction initiatives in WHO European Member States by highlighting activities related to the action points of the relevant global frameworks.

Keywords

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES - prevention and control
DIET, SODIUM-RESTRICTED - utilization
HYPERTENSION - prevention and control
NUTRITION AND FOOD SAFETY
SODIUM CHLORIDE, DIETARY
Address requests about publications of the WHO Regional Offi
ce for Europe to:

Publications WHO Regional Office for Europe
UN City, Marmorvej 51
DK–2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark

Alternatively, complete an online request form for documentation, healthinformation, or for permission to quote or translate, on the Regional Office web site (http://www.euro.who.int/).

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Christina Dian Parmionova on Apr 05, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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Mapping salt reduction initiatives inthe WHO European Region
 
ABSTRACT
 Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading causes of mortality globally, accounting for more deathsthan all other causes combined. An urgent development issue, NCDs strike hardest at the world’s low- andmiddle-income populations, where nearly 80% of NCD-related deaths occur. In order to reduce the growingburden of NCDs, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends reducing salt intake in the generalpopulation as a cost-effective strategy. Measures in this direction are considered a “best-buy” approachto preventing NCDs. Salt is a commonly used term referring specifically to sodium chloride (5 g salt
2 gsodium). The positive health impact of reducing an individual’s salt intake is reflected in scientific evidenceof a corresponding reduction in blood pressure, among other benefits. Accordingly, WHO recommends apopulation salt intake level of less than 5 g per person per day for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.Salt intake in most WHO European Region countries is far above the suggested amount. The purpose of thisreport is to present an up-to-date view of current salt reduction initiatives in WHO European Member Statesby highlighting activities related to the action points of the relevant global frameworks.
Keywords
CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES - prevention and controlDIET, SODIUM-RESTRICTED - utilizationHYPERTENSION - prevention and controlNUTRITION AND FOOD SAFETYSODIUM CHLORIDE, DIETARYAddress requests about publications of the WHO Regional Office for Europe to:PublicationsWHO Regional Office for EuropeUN City, Marmorvej 51DK–2100 Copenhagen Ø, DenmarkAlternatively, complete an online request form for documentation, health information, or for permission toquote or translate, on the Regional Office web site (http://www.euro.who.int/).
ii
© World Health Organization 2013
All rights reserved. The Regional Office for Europe of the World Health Organization welcomes requestsfor permission to reproduce or translate its publications, in part or in full.The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publication do not imply theexpression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning the legalstatus of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of itsfrontiers or boundaries. Dotted lines on maps represent approximate border lines for which there maynot yet be full agreement.The mention of specific companies or of certain manufacturers’’’’ products does not imply that theyare endorsed or recommended by the World Health Organization in preference to others of a similarnature that are not mentioned. Errors and omissions excepted, the names of proprietary products aredistinguished by initial capital letters.All reasonable precautions have been taken by the World Health Organization to verify the informationcontained in this publication. However, the published material is being distributed without warrantyof any kind, either express or implied. The responsibility for the interpretation and use of the materiallies with the reader. In no event shall the World Health Organization be liable for damages arising fromits use. The views expressed by authors, editors, or expert groups do not necessarily represent thedecisions or the stated policy of the World Health Organization.
 
CONTENTS
Acknowledgements and contributors ............................................................................. ivAbbreviations ..................................................................................................................... vForeword ......................................................................................................................... viiiIntroduction ........................................................................................................................ 1Background ........................................................................................................................ 1WHO and international initiatives for reduction of salt intake ...................................... 1Rationale and impact of salt reduction measures .......................................................... 3Methods of policy survey and analysis ........................................................................... 4Sources of evidence .......................................................................................................... 4Data extraction ................................................................................................................... 5Structure of the analysis ................................................................................................... 5Salt reduction initiatives: country profiles ....................................................................... 6Albania ................................................................................................................................ 6Andorra ............................................................................................................................... 6Armenia .............................................................................................................................. 6Austria ................................................................................................................................ 7Azerbaijan ........................................................................................................................... 7Belarus ................................................................................................................................ 7Belgium .............................................................................................................................. 7Bosnia and Herzegovina ................................................................................................... 8Bulgaria .............................................................................................................................. 8Croatia ................................................................................................................................ 9Cyprus................................................................................................................................. 9Czech Republic ..................................................................................................................10Denmark ............................................................................................................................11Estonia .............................................................................................................................. 12Finland .............................................................................................................................. 13France ................................................................................................................................14Georgia ............................................................................................................................. 15
iii

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