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2008 United States National Seismic Hazard Maps

2008 United States National Seismic Hazard Maps

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Published by Rich Hintz
T he U.S. Geological Survey’s
National Seismic Hazard
Maps are the basis for seismic
design provisions of building
codes, insurance rate structures,
earthquake loss studies, retrofit
priorities, and land-use planning.
Incorporating these hazard
maps into designs of buildings,
bridges, highways, and critical
infrastructure allows these
structures to withstand earthquake
shaking without collapse.
Properly engineered designs not
only save lives, but also reduce
disruption to critical activities
following a damaging event. By
estimating the likely shaking
for a given area, the maps also
help engineers avoid costs from
over-design for unlikely levels of
ground motion.
T he U.S. Geological Survey’s
National Seismic Hazard
Maps are the basis for seismic
design provisions of building
codes, insurance rate structures,
earthquake loss studies, retrofit
priorities, and land-use planning.
Incorporating these hazard
maps into designs of buildings,
bridges, highways, and critical
infrastructure allows these
structures to withstand earthquake
shaking without collapse.
Properly engineered designs not
only save lives, but also reduce
disruption to critical activities
following a damaging event. By
estimating the likely shaking
for a given area, the maps also
help engineers avoid costs from
over-design for unlikely levels of
ground motion.

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Published by: Rich Hintz on Mar 20, 2009
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% g16-3232-4848-6464+8-164-80-4Highest hazardLowest hazard
U.S. Department of the InteriorU.S. Geological SurveyFact Sheet 2008–3018April 2008
Printed on recycled paper
2008 United States National Seismic Hazard Maps
he U.S. Geological Survey’s National Seismic Hazard Maps are the basis for seismic design provisions of building codes, insurance rate structures,earthquake loss studies, retrofit priorities, and land-use plan-ning. Incorporating these hazard maps into designs of buildings,bridges, highways, and criti-cal infrastructure allows these structures to withstand earth-quake shaking without collapse.Properly engineered designs not only save lives, but also reduce disruption to critical activities following a damaging event. By estimating the likely shaking for a given area, the maps also help engineers avoid costs from over-design for unlikely levels of ground motion.
The Update Process
The U.S. Geological Survey recently updated theNational Seismic Hazard Maps by incorporating new seismic,geologic, and geodetic information on earthquake rates andassociated ground shaking. These 2008 maps supersede ver-sions released in 1996 and 2002. Updating the maps involvedinteractions with hundreds of scientists and engineers atregional and topical workshops. USGS also solicited advicefrom working groups, expert panels, State geological surveys,Federal agencies, and hazard experts from industry and aca-demia. The Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Centerdeveloped new crustal ground-motion models; the WorkingGroup on California Earthquake Probabilities revised theCalifornia earthquake rate model; the Western States SeismicPolicy Council submitted recommendations for the Intermoun-tain West; and three expert panels were assembled to provideadvice on best available science.
Changes to the Maps
The most significant changes to the 2008 maps fall intotwo categories, as follows:Changes to earthquake source and occurrence rate models:1.In California, the source model was updated to account
•
for new scientific information on faults. For example,models for the southern San Andreas Fault Systemwere modified to incorporate new geologic data. Thesource model was also modified to better match thehistorical rate of magnitude 6.5 to 7 earthquakes.The Cascadia Subduction Zone lying offshore of 
•
northern California, Oregon, and Washington was mod-eled using a distribution of large earthquakes betweenmagnitude 8 and 9. Additional weight was given to thepossibility for a catastrophic magnitude 9 earthquakethat ruptures, on average, every 500 years from north-ern California to Washington, compared to a model thatallows for smaller ruptures.
Colors on this map show the levels of horizontal shaking that have a 2-in-100 chance of being exceeded in a 50-year period. Shaking is expressed as a percentage of 
is the acceleration of a falling object due to gravity).

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