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Field Artillery Journal - Jul 1945

Field Artillery Journal - Jul 1945

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Published by CAP History Library
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Published by: CAP History Library on Apr 07, 2013
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 Each of these books is aunique contribution in its field 
CHINA LOOKSFORWARD
 
by Sun Fo
 
"Sun Fo is one of the most thoughtful of China'sleaders . . . He has also been, among Chinese of  prominence, one of the most outspoken in criticism. . . Not many men in China have minds of so widea sweep, are as well informed on the world . . .This book is contemporary China at its best . . ."—  Nathaniel Peffer,
 N. Y. Times Book Review
.
$3.00
 
MY COUNTRY ANDMY PEOPLE
 
by Lin Yutang 
 
"The truest, the most profound, the mostcomplete, the most important book yet writtenabout China. And, best of all, it is written by aChinese, a modern whose roots are firmly in the past, but whose rich flowering is in the present."— 
 From the introduction by
P
EARL
S.B
UCK 
. "This is a thoughtful and beautiful book,and a civilized one." Carl Van Doren,
 N. Y. Herald Tribune. Illustrated. Index
.
$3.50
 
CHINA'S STRUGGLEFOR RAILROADDEVELOPMENT
 
by Chiang Kia-Ngau
 
"A monograph, and a good one, on the history of Chinese railroads . . . a solid and informative book on a neglected aspect of China's development . . .A series of remarkable photographs helps to makeclear the tremendous difficulties encountered inkeeping the trains running, and reveals the quietheroism and dogged effort by which thesedifficulties have been overcome."— 
ChicagoTribune. Photographs. Maps. Index
.
$5.00
 
AMERICAN EMPIREIN ASIA
 
by Albert Viton
 
"A brief summary of the politics and economics of Japan, China, India, the Soviet Union, and the smaller countries of the Near and Middle East, together with agood deal of thoughtful comment on imperialism andinteresting speculation as to the basis of Far Easternand world peace."— 
 N. Y. Times Book Review
.
$3.00
 
A SHORT HISTORYOF CHINESECIVILIZATION
 
by Tsui Chi 
 
A one volume history of China from the earliesttimes up to the present day—a work that stressesChina's enormous mass of traditions and how theyaffect the new China. "We are able to see earlyChinese history as seen by the Chinese themselves. . . Fascinating reading."— 
Chicago Tribune
.
$4.00
 
GATEWAY TO ASIA:SINKIANG
 
by Martin R. Norins
 
An exciting introduction to a rich untapped frontier where, after the war. American capital may findemployment in the development of vast mineralresources. A strategic wedge. Sinkiang may serve as adirect supply line for a final blow against Japan.
 Maps. Photographs
.
$2.75
 
MODERN KOREA
 
A STUDY OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMICCHANGES UNDER JAPANESE RULE
 
by Andrew J. Grajdanzev
 
A free Korea is an important factor in the defeat of Japan. This handbook of its history, geography, population, industry, trade, agriculture, education,government, and social institutions clarifies the problems standing in the way of Koreanindependence.
Statistical tables, appendices and  source references
.
$4.00
 
U. S. FIELD ARTILLERYASSOCIATION
 
1218 CONNECTICUT AVENUEWASHINGTON 6, D. C.
 
LT. COL. JOHN E. COLEMAN,
 Editor 
 
MAJ. BERTRAM H. WHITE,
 Assistant 
 
LENNA PEDIGO,
 Business Manager 
WE HOPE YOU LIKE the "face lifting"program that is started in this issue. Noradical changes are contemplated, but thepressure for space has cased to the point thatonce again we feel justified in devoting someof the JOURNAL'S area to eye-appeal.
 
During the days of training the expandedarmy, and while we were fighting a two-front war, it was most important that yourJOURNAL make available to you as muchtraining and combat information aspossible, at the earliest possible moment. Tothat end every available square inch of paper surface was devoted. Something hadto suffer, of course; in this case it wasgraceful appearance of our pages.
 
There is now no change in our primarymission of aiding in every possible waytroops in combat or who are headed for it.At the same time we can once again work toward the more attractive format of prewar days. Changes will be gradual. And,to repeat, we hope you like them.
 
IN MONTHS TO COME we shall continueto cover the Pacific war to the fullest extentthat fighting conditions permit. It is our policyto publish primarily articles written byparticipants themselves. Such accounts havethe greatest authenticity, as well as local color.Times of great activity, however, reduce theflow of material to us. But we will continue tobring a considerable number of Pacific combatnarratives, both for the sake of those engagedand for the benefit of you who are headed forthe Far East.
 
We also will continue covering theEuropean war, now ended. Many of theformer security restrictions have beenremoved. You may now tell your storiesfully and completely, naming units andpersons, places, movements, etc., "giving thedevil his due" as well as making yourmaterial of greater interest to allartillerymen. Our thanks for your help.
The United States FieldArtillery Association
 
ORGANIZED JUNE 7, 1910
 
President
 
Major General Lewis B. Hershey
 
Vice-President
 
Major General Ralph McT. Pennell
 
Executive Council
 
Major General C. C. Haffner, Jr.
 
Major General Lewis B. Hershey
 
Brigadier General William H. Sands
 
Colonel Stuart A. Beckley
 
Colonel Ralph C. Bishop
 
Colonel Michael Buckley, Jr.
 
Colonel Alan L. Campbell
 
Colonel Malcolm R. Cox
 
Lieutenant Colonel F. Gorham Brigham, Jr.
 
Secretary-Treasurer
 
Lieutenant Colonel John E. Coleman
 
The Field Artillery Journal
JULY, 1945—Vol. 35, No. 7
 
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Published monthly by the United States Field Artillery Association. Publication office 3110 Elm Avenue, Baltimore 11. Md. Editorialand general offices United States Field Artillery Association, 1218 Connecticut Avenue, Washington 6, D. C. Address allcommunications for publication to the Washington office. Entered as second class matter August 20, 1929, at the post office atBaltimore, Md. Accepted for mailing at the special rate of postage provided in Sec. 1103. Act of October 3, 1917, Copyright, 1945, byThe United States Field Artillery Association. Subscription price $3.00; Canada $4.00; foreign $3.50; single recent copies to members,25 cents; non-members, 35 cents. T
HE
F
IELD
A
RTILLERY
J
OURNAL
does not accept paid advertising. It does pay for original articlesaccepted but unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by return postage if they are to be returned.
 Addresses and ranks will bechanged as frequently as desired, upon notification; not otherwise. Changes should reach the editor three weeks before date of next issue. Immediate notice should be given of any delay in the receipt of the magazine
.
 Authors alone are responsible for statements made. No articles are official unless specifically so described.
 

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