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The Value of Online Conversations by Brian Solis

The Value of Online Conversations by Brian Solis

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Published by Brian Solis
Indeed, the barrier to entry has been lowered to a point where new user-generated content is only going to increase in volume and frequency and not necessarily in value along the way. But, for those who pay close attention to the shift in the behavior of adoption, creation, and consumption of media in all forms, it is also blinding with insight.
Indeed, the barrier to entry has been lowered to a point where new user-generated content is only going to increase in volume and frequency and not necessarily in value along the way. But, for those who pay close attention to the shift in the behavior of adoption, creation, and consumption of media in all forms, it is also blinding with insight.

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Categories:Business/Law
Published by: Brian Solis on Mar 23, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/17/2012

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The Value of Online Conversations
By Brian Solis, blogger at  PR 2.0  and principal of FutureWorksPR, Co- Author Putting the Public Back in Public Relationsand Now Is Gone
No, blogs are not dying. No, blogs are not going away. Blogs will continue to serve asone of the driving forces for the democratization of how content is created, shared, andalso internalized.All forms of user-generated content will continue to excel...maybe to a fault.In conjunction with how blogs are continuing to influence the evolution of onlineconversations,micromediais also inspiring new forms content creation and in turn,contributing to the spike of mostly irrelevant conversations.Steve Rubel recently accused bloggers of contributing to the “lazysphere” by simplyglomming on to other “me too” conversations rather than creating new ideas or penningthoughtful, "deep" essays. In a side discussion with Steve, he also added that it’s notabout length either, it’s simply about good content. He's right.Indeed, the barrier to entry has been lowered to a point where new user-generatedcontent is only going to increase in volume and frequency and not necessarily in valuealong the way. But, for those who pay close attention to the shift in the behavior of adoption, creation, and consumption of media in all forms, it is also blinding with insight.
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis
 
Creating content is just one part of the conversation.Regardless of format or distribution channel, it’s still only a one-way street until someoneresponds, trackback, bookmark, comment, etc. And this is the part where I think we needto focus in order to positively impact and nurture the future of online conversations.It’s not just about the source, it’s about the dialog that ensues and the ideas anddiscoveries that emerge along the way.This goes beyond the original premise that anyone with an important idea or thought willsimply blog it. In my experience, the most enlightening part of any topic is always theconversation…and in the world of Social Media, that conversation is in the form of thevery actions that are triggered by the original topic.If you took the time, whether as a reader or a writer, to read the comments of a favoriteblog post for example, you’d find brilliance, perspective, and new opinions that allow atopic to genuinely flourish. At the same time, you can also find a series of comments thatare completely pointless and distracting that can take away from the value of theconversation.Again, content is increasing in production to the point where it’s almost impossible tonavigate through the static. Instead of honing on and strengthening relevant signals, we jump from place to place and from conversation to conversation, contributing most of our time to sharing less important content than the very ideas that can help empower thevalue of each online communitywhere we engage.We move too quickly.Concurrently, we’re groomed to think that older posts are also aging in context andrelevance. Unfortunately, rather than continuing to live, breath, and evolve, thesediscussions are often buried by new content often to be recreated from scratchelsewhere. How quickly we move away from what could become timeless masterpieces.
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis
 
We’re also not conditioned to contribute productively, therefore, most posts wither awayinto the history books (aka deeper and deeper into search results). Commenting has sofar is mostly representative of either applause, reaffirmation, trackbacks, and dartthrowing mixed in with new ideas, thoughts, and content. Most of the time, the value isburied and eventually lost, but it should be elevated as a way of inspiring and re-energizing the conversation.What if we spent less time cranking out posts and more time joining, spotlighting andpromoting the conversations that take place in the comments section, forums, andacross social networks?It’s an interesting thought…but at the moment, the architecture of many social platformsare designed to spotlight the stage of the initial thought/article and not necessarily theensuing conversation. Depending on the outlet, you may have to sift through 95%garbage in order to find valuable insight and perspective.There isn't a filter for expertise other than your time and effort.In order for conversations to flourish online, the architecture of social platforms needs toevolve. It is also the key to inspiring more meaningful dialog.It all comes back to the notion that “participation is marketing.” And, participation doesn’t
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis

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