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The Social Revolution is Our Industrial Revolution by Brian Solis

The Social Revolution is Our Industrial Revolution by Brian Solis

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Published by Brian Solis
Evolution is evolution - and it's happened before us and will continue after we're gone. But, what's taking place now is much more than change for the sake of change. The socialization of content creation, consumption and participation, is hastening the metamorphosis that transforms everyday people into participants of a powerful and valuable media literate society.
Evolution is evolution - and it's happened before us and will continue after we're gone. But, what's taking place now is much more than change for the sake of change. The socialization of content creation, consumption and participation, is hastening the metamorphosis that transforms everyday people into participants of a powerful and valuable media literate society.

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Published by: Brian Solis on Mar 23, 2009
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12/17/2012

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The Social Revolution is Our Industrial Revolution
By Brian Solis, blogger at  PR 2.0  and principal of FutureWorksPR, Co- Author Putting the Public Back in Public Relationsand Now Is Gone
Broadcast and print media and the services that support the creation and distribution of information are not dead and Social Media is not going to get indicted for holding thesmoking gun.These powerful, influential, and age-old industries are however, undergoing some of their most radical transformations and metamorphoses in order to adapt to the elusiveand rapidly shifting information landscape.Money is migrating away from traditional media as well as the industries and servicesthat support it - from creation to distribution.Is Social Media to blame?Any expert,thought leader , or analyst will claim that this transition was christened in the 90s with the popularization of the Internet aka Web 1.0. And, those who have contributedto its evolution will tell you that "social media" is already starting to wear thin amongthose in their respective echo chambers. There's a bell curve of adoption, and most of these discussions are on the far left of it. "The rest of us" will never refer to thesocialization of information as "social media." To them it will simply be regarded asmedia, conversations, reading, and sharing.But behind the scenes, history is in the making.Evolution is evolution - and it's happened before us and will continue after we're gone.But, what's taking place now is much more than change for the sake of change. Thesocialization of content creation, consumption and participation, is hastening themetamorphosis that transforms everyday people into participants of a powerful andvaluable media literate society.
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis
 
These are the times that experts will look back and officially classify as the SocialRevolution, distinctly and separately from the Internet Revolution. These is the genrewhen big media and its supporting services started to listen and we the peopleembraced and employed the ability to share our individual and collective voices.We're at the dawn of new era in media production, participation, and literacy. You
are
making history.
Death vs. Evolution
Media, in general, isn't dead, it's changing.Yes print and broadcast advertising is down and online screen time is up. But, dollarsaren't evaporating, they're migrating and propagating as we continue to invest in the top-down strategies that still work, albeit differently than before, while simultaneouslyinvesting in more niche-focused channels to reach and interact with specific groups of people directly.In the last century, the world has witnessed some of the most incredible and radicaladvancements in the business of influence and perception management, including, butnot limited to:The printing press.The wire.Radio.TV.Satellite.Network infrastructure.The Web.The Social Web.Clouds.Media is experiencing a textbook Darwinian definition of survival of the fittest as thehuman race and our patterns for discovering, sharing and producing content matures. Itwill re-emerge as a more dynamic, nimble, and innovative medium.Mainstay brands will persevere, but the cost of their education to learn how to competefor the future will be great. Some will borrow models from those who already proved newrules for engagement, others will acquire and integrate the new and rising influencerswho lead by example, and a few poor souls will wait until it's too late only to awaken to adaunting challenge of creating and earning presence and relevance in a new economy.
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis
 
The Evolution of Influence and the Democratization of Content
Looking back over the last several decades, it's practically unbelievable to fathom thedepth and vastness of our media-dependent societies and the pivotal role influenceplays in defining who we are and what we believe. The business of information creationand distribution has driven and defined our global economies. In the last century, theincreasingly rapid pace of innovation has globalized, localized, and streamlined thedistribution of information, what we thought about, and how we processed, news, trendsand current events - and in turn, influenced how our societies evolved in the real world.In addition to pioneers, big business, lobbyists, and outside interests, the media industrywas and still is shaped by journalists, entrepreneurs, enthusiasts, communicators, andzealots who were inspired to share their voice, their insight, and their passions, their way. Through news, editorial, opinion, and field reporting, media, and information, is thecommon thread that stitches people and societies together.It's how we learn.It inspires us.It contributes to who we are.Towards the end of the 1990s, the Web, and its architects, forged the tools that wouldspark a renaissance of influence and empowerment. These tools would inspire people tobuild new interconnected platforms for content that would collectively and ultimatelyignite a social revolution and usher a new exchange for information that has all the signsand economic potential of a modern dayIndustrial Revolution.The Industrial Revolution was a period in the late 18th and early 19th centuries whenmajor changes in agriculture, manufacturing, and transportation had a profound effect onthe socioeconomic and cultural conditions in Britain. The changes subsequently spreadthroughout Europe and North America and eventually the world, a process thatcontinues as industrialization. The onset of the Industrial Revolution marked a major turning point in human society; almost every aspect of daily life was eventuallyinfluenced in some way.
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis

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