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Aesthetics and Universality in Perspective Revised

Aesthetics and Universality in Perspective Revised

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Published by Cynthia Gallagher
Introduction (Revised)
As they read aloud passages of dramatic works both of Confucius and of Renaissance writers, for example, adult learners have an opportunity to participate in a kind of role play as they identify with authors, subjects, characters, cultural dynamics, atmosphere, conflict, and aesthetics of uniquely different times and lands. Upon delivery of the dramatic presentations noted here, the lesson and the glossaries noted in Appendix A and Appendix B serve as important guidelines toward reflection about the examples and the open-ended questions that follow about culture and aesthetics. This is an introduction to questions about ancient and precedential works, including the Ode--the vision, observations, and perspectives of today’s combatant--a literary work that must be preceded by a study in aesthetical literary issues.
The instruction, which includes open-ended questions, is an introduction to the mission that caused the divisions of the Latin, Hellenic, Balto-Slavic, and Chinese languages throughout the trade routes of the Mediterranean, the Ukraine, and the Baltic Peninsula. By analyzing psycho-linguistic influences of the ancient philosopher or literary voice, the learner may derive problem-solving strategies and compassion required to foresee and to prevent abnormal struggle and hostility, because the analysis of combat requires a psychoanalytic review of motives. Learning-experience contexts include further research and reading that pertain to aesthetics in literature, psychology, social sciences, progressive learning environments, and collaboration of further adult-learner instruction (Barnes Gallagher, 2010). Appendices of glossaries and reading material are included to assist in the understanding and analyzing of the dynamics of dramatic prose, which augment studies of Confucius and words such as patriotism, pidginization, diaspora, and semantics, which evoke different connotations among languages. Extra reading material is included that will influence the objectives of the project, and that will enhance the reading experience of the adult learner. As they read aloud dramatic classics, learners will be motivated to explore and to share aesthetics from an authentic but universal domain as they identify with the author’s voice.

I. Aesthetics and Universality in Perspective: Learning Outcomes

In respect to the competencies set forth by the Intersegmental Committee of the Academic Senates (2002), adult learners will:

1. Recognize aesthetical and cultural qualities of literature.
Associated with axiology, aesthetics involves the study of ethical values and value judgments that involve form, truth, beauty, and symmetry. Innovators of aesthetical literature tend to treat universal problems through patriotic associations of pride, melancholy and/or defeat, and through a universal quest for divine awareness—concepts that are not consistent in meaning throughout nations, religions, and generations. Aestheticism that scholars have learned to recognize since the 18th Century does involve the philosophy of Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), who taught “l’art pour l’art” (art for art’s sake). Philosophers and critics of all art forms, both literary and visual, attempt to define the properties of rational understanding. Kant did recognize that the concept of beauty and of normality varied from culture to culture (Barnes Gallagher, 2011). Walter Pater (1839-1894) later influenced the European definition of “aestheticism” with the idea that artistic style and moral effect must expand sympathies and compassion across cultures (See Appendix A).

2. Apply approaches to their reading and critical analyses of rhetorical, literary, and aesthetical issues of numerous genres.
Ancient philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle had written that an object either does or does not possess a quality such as beauty with no regard to the culture of the object’s observer. At last, David Hume (1711-1776) taught that specific
Introduction (Revised)
As they read aloud passages of dramatic works both of Confucius and of Renaissance writers, for example, adult learners have an opportunity to participate in a kind of role play as they identify with authors, subjects, characters, cultural dynamics, atmosphere, conflict, and aesthetics of uniquely different times and lands. Upon delivery of the dramatic presentations noted here, the lesson and the glossaries noted in Appendix A and Appendix B serve as important guidelines toward reflection about the examples and the open-ended questions that follow about culture and aesthetics. This is an introduction to questions about ancient and precedential works, including the Ode--the vision, observations, and perspectives of today’s combatant--a literary work that must be preceded by a study in aesthetical literary issues.
The instruction, which includes open-ended questions, is an introduction to the mission that caused the divisions of the Latin, Hellenic, Balto-Slavic, and Chinese languages throughout the trade routes of the Mediterranean, the Ukraine, and the Baltic Peninsula. By analyzing psycho-linguistic influences of the ancient philosopher or literary voice, the learner may derive problem-solving strategies and compassion required to foresee and to prevent abnormal struggle and hostility, because the analysis of combat requires a psychoanalytic review of motives. Learning-experience contexts include further research and reading that pertain to aesthetics in literature, psychology, social sciences, progressive learning environments, and collaboration of further adult-learner instruction (Barnes Gallagher, 2010). Appendices of glossaries and reading material are included to assist in the understanding and analyzing of the dynamics of dramatic prose, which augment studies of Confucius and words such as patriotism, pidginization, diaspora, and semantics, which evoke different connotations among languages. Extra reading material is included that will influence the objectives of the project, and that will enhance the reading experience of the adult learner. As they read aloud dramatic classics, learners will be motivated to explore and to share aesthetics from an authentic but universal domain as they identify with the author’s voice.

I. Aesthetics and Universality in Perspective: Learning Outcomes

In respect to the competencies set forth by the Intersegmental Committee of the Academic Senates (2002), adult learners will:

1. Recognize aesthetical and cultural qualities of literature.
Associated with axiology, aesthetics involves the study of ethical values and value judgments that involve form, truth, beauty, and symmetry. Innovators of aesthetical literature tend to treat universal problems through patriotic associations of pride, melancholy and/or defeat, and through a universal quest for divine awareness—concepts that are not consistent in meaning throughout nations, religions, and generations. Aestheticism that scholars have learned to recognize since the 18th Century does involve the philosophy of Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), who taught “l’art pour l’art” (art for art’s sake). Philosophers and critics of all art forms, both literary and visual, attempt to define the properties of rational understanding. Kant did recognize that the concept of beauty and of normality varied from culture to culture (Barnes Gallagher, 2011). Walter Pater (1839-1894) later influenced the European definition of “aestheticism” with the idea that artistic style and moral effect must expand sympathies and compassion across cultures (See Appendix A).

2. Apply approaches to their reading and critical analyses of rhetorical, literary, and aesthetical issues of numerous genres.
Ancient philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle had written that an object either does or does not possess a quality such as beauty with no regard to the culture of the object’s observer. At last, David Hume (1711-1776) taught that specific

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Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: Cynthia Gallagher on Apr 12, 2013
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01/28/2014

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Aesthetics and Universality in Perspective 
By C. Barnes Gallagher June 22, 2010; Revised on April 12, 2013Author of wayward LOCHES, Pirouetting Spheres, Arising Ode
 
Aesthetics and Universality in Perspective 2
Table of Contents
 
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Aesthetics and Universality in Perspective 3
Abstract
Aesthetics directly correspond with the study of ethical values, progressive philosophicalvalues between cultures, and developmental foundations of grammar. Involving truth, beauty,symmetry, and ethical values that continue to merge across cultures, aesthetical qualitiesinfluence semantics at all levels as specific groups of languages evolve and coalesce into acoherent universal communicative system. Through an introduction to literary aesthetics, the perceptive learner will realize that words have evoked progressive and even contradictorymeanings since their origin; and that linguistic and aesthetic components are integrated into thetheories and ongoing history of all academic subjects. Of foremost importance, they becomeconscious of the need to select words with great care.

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