Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Improving Business Processes

Improving Business Processes

Ratings: (0)|Views: 4 |Likes:
Published by ClassOf1.com
Business Processes is defined as “a set of logically related tasks or activities performed to achieve a defined business outcome.” For our purposes, these outcomes can be physical, informational, or even monetary in nature. Physical outcomes might include the manufacture and delivery of goods to a customer; an informational outcome might be registering for college courses; and, finally, a monetary outcome might include payment to a supply chain partner for services rendered. Of course, many business processes have elements of all three.
Business Processes is defined as “a set of logically related tasks or activities performed to achieve a defined business outcome.” For our purposes, these outcomes can be physical, informational, or even monetary in nature. Physical outcomes might include the manufacture and delivery of goods to a customer; an informational outcome might be registering for college courses; and, finally, a monetary outcome might include payment to a supply chain partner for services rendered. Of course, many business processes have elements of all three.

More info:

Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: ClassOf1.com on Apr 17, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/17/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 
OperationManagement 
LEARN TO EXCEL
Homework Help
24/7 Support
Step-by-Step Solutions
 
 
Sub: Operation Management Topic:
 
Business Processes
*
Improving Business Processes
 
Business Processes
 
is defined as “a set of logically related tasks or activities performed to achieve adefined business outcome.” For our purposes, these outcomes can be physical, informational, or
even monetary in nature. Physical outcomes might include the manufacture and delivery of goods toa customer; an informational outcome might be registering for college courses; and, finally, amonetary outcome might include payment to a supply chain partner for services rendered. Of course, many business processes have elements of all three. In recent years, corporate executivesand management theorists alike have recognized the importance of putting in place businessprocesses that effectively manage the flow of information, products, and money across the supplychain. One reason is the dollars involved: Experts estimate that total supply chain costs represent themajority of the total operating budget for most organizations; in some cases they may be as high as75 percent.
Let’s
see the idea of 
improving business processes
with an example many collegestudents are familiar with: enrolling in classes each semester. Not too long ago students had tointeract with three distinct functional areas in order to register: the individual colleges ordepartments (which granted permission
to take classes), the registrar’s office (which managed theactual enrollment process), and the cashier’s office (which handled tuition payments). A student
would first visit his home college or department to pick up the proper permission forms, and thenschedule his classes, and finally pay tuition. Of course, any problem in the system could force thestudent to revisit one or more of these areas.This process was convenient for everyone but the students. Now many colleges and universities havereorganized these activities into a single process with a focus on speed, accuracy and convenience tothe students. Students can now register and pay tuition all with one phone call or visit to a Web site.In some cases, students can even purchase their books and have them automatically delivered to
 
 
Sub: Operation Management Topic:
 
Business Processes
*
them. The key point is this: Improving the enrollment process required the different functional areasto look beyond their own activities and see the process through the customers'
(i.e., students’) eyes.
 
Improving business process
is at the very core of operations and supply chain management. For onething, the performance level of most processes tends to decrease over time unless forces are exertedto maintain it. In addition, even if an organization does not feel a need to improve its businessprocesses, it may be forced to due to competitive pressures
. Finally, today’s cus
tomers are becomingmore and more demanding. Thus, what a customer might have considered quite satisfactory a fewyears ago might not meet his or her requirements today.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->