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Scientology Tech Dictionary Definition Comparisons

Scientology Tech Dictionary Definition Comparisons

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Published by AnonLover
The Dianetics and Scientology Technical Dictionary ("Tech Dictionary") by L. Ron Hubbard is referred to as a comprehensive guide to their "religion." The Tech Dictionary is over 500 pages, was first published in 1975 by the Church of Scientology and then reprinted in 1982 by Bridge Publications. The text defines of all the terms relating to auditing and the technology of Dianetics and Scientology including explanations of the various processes, e-meter phenomena, track incidents, and components of the mind and material universe. The text is now out of print due to newer editions of Hubbard's books having an expanded glossary section that includes the relevant definitions previously printed separately. This document represents a fair use sampling of the mind bending terms in the Tech Dictionary compared to what the same words/phrases actually mean in the real word. This exegetical analysis is an attempt to reflect a side-by-side comparison that shows how badly the loaded language of the bizarre newspeak and totalistic rhetoric that Hubbard mastered really is inside the world of Scientology's alternative psychotherapy practices.
The Dianetics and Scientology Technical Dictionary ("Tech Dictionary") by L. Ron Hubbard is referred to as a comprehensive guide to their "religion." The Tech Dictionary is over 500 pages, was first published in 1975 by the Church of Scientology and then reprinted in 1982 by Bridge Publications. The text defines of all the terms relating to auditing and the technology of Dianetics and Scientology including explanations of the various processes, e-meter phenomena, track incidents, and components of the mind and material universe. The text is now out of print due to newer editions of Hubbard's books having an expanded glossary section that includes the relevant definitions previously printed separately. This document represents a fair use sampling of the mind bending terms in the Tech Dictionary compared to what the same words/phrases actually mean in the real word. This exegetical analysis is an attempt to reflect a side-by-side comparison that shows how badly the loaded language of the bizarre newspeak and totalistic rhetoric that Hubbard mastered really is inside the world of Scientology's alternative psychotherapy practices.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: AnonLover on Apr 17, 2013
Copyright:Public Domain

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03/26/2014

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Dianetics and Scientology Technical Dictionary Definition Comparisons:  An Exegetical Examination of Variance
Table of Contents
[
 Ed. note –The definitions contained herein represent common usage terminology in the world of Scientology where the standard dictionary definition varies in an unusual or worrisome way. Individual sections of this document will eventually be included within upcoming releases in the Scientology Religiosity? Series of research catalogs on Scribd.
 Last updated: July 26, 2013
 
Page 2 of 7
Prologue: The Loaded Language of Non-thought in Totalistic Rhetoric
“The term ‘loading the language’ refers to a literelization of language—and to words or images becoming god. A greatly simplified language may seem cliche-ridden but can have enormous appeal and psychological power in its very simplification. Because every issue in one's life—and these are often very complicated young lives---can be reduced to a single set of principles that have an inner coherence, one can claim the experience of truth and feel it. Answers are available. Lionel Trilling has called this the ‘language of non-thought’ because there is a cliche and a simple explanation to which the most complicated and otherwise difficult questions can be reduced.” -- Robert Jay Lifton, The Future of Immortality and Other Essays for a Nuclear Age (1987)  —————————————————— “The language of the totalist environment is characterized by the thought-terminating cliché. The most far-reaching and complex of human problems are compressed into brief, highly reductive, definitive-sounding phrases, easily memorized and easily expressed. These become the start and finish of any ideological analysis. In thought reform, for instance, the phrase ‘bourgeois mentality’ is used to encompass and critically dismiss ordinarily troublesome concerns like the quest for individual expression, the exploration of alternative ideas, and the search of perspective and balance in political judgments. And in addition to their function as interpretative shortcuts, these clichés become what Richard Weaver  has called ‘ultimate terms’: either ‘god terms,’ representative of ultimate good; or ‘devil terms,’ representative of ultimate evil. …Totalist language, then, is repetitiously centered on all-encompassing jargon, prematurely abstract, highly categorical, relentlessly judging, and to anyone but it’s most devoted advocate, deadly dull: in Lionel Trilling’s phrase, ‘the language of non-thought’ “…For an individual person, the effect of the language of ideological totalism can be summed up in one word: constriction. He is, so to speak, linguistically deprived; and since language is central to all human experience, his capacities for thinking and feeling are immensely narrowed.”
 
-- Robert Jay Lifton, Thought Reform and the Psychology of Totalism (1961; pg. 429-30) “In this respect, thought reform is clearly a child of its era, for Weaver claims [
in his 1953 essay first  published in 1955
] that ‘progress’ is the ‘“god term” of the present age,’ and also lists ‘progressive,’ ‘science,’ ‘fact,’ and ‘modern’ as other widely-used ‘god terms’ (‘Ultimate Terms in contemporary Rhetotic,’
 Perspectives
(1955), 11, 1-2, 141) All these terms have a similar standing in thought reform.” – Robert Jay Lifton, Thought Reform and the Psychology of Totalism (1961; citing Richard M. Weaver, pg. 499) “The term ‘modern’ shares in the rhetorical forces of the others thus far discussed [
 progress, progressive,  science, fact 
], and stands not far below the top. Its place in the general ordering is intelligible through the
 
 L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Definition Comparisons: Loaded Language Prologue
Page 3 of 7 same history. Where progress is real, there is a natural presumption that the latest will be the best. Hence it is generally thought that to describe anything as 'modem’ is to credit it with all the improvements which have  been made up to now. Then by a transference the term is applied to realms where valuation is, or ought to be, of a different source. In consequence, we have ‘modern living’ urged upon us as an ideal; ‘the modern mind’ is mentioned as something superior to previous minds; sometimes the modiier stands alone as an epithet of approval: ‘to become modern’ or ‘to sound modern’ are expressions that carry valuation. It is of course idle not to expect an age to feel that some of its ways and habits of mind are the best; but the extensive transformations of the past hundred years seem to have given ‘modern’ a much more decisive meaning. It is as if a difference of degree had changed into a difference of kind. But the very fact that a word is not used very analytically may increase its rhetorical potency, as we shall see later in connection with a special group of terms.” -- Richard M. Weaver, The Ethics of Rhetoric: Chapter IX Ultimate Terms in Contemporary Rhetotic (1953 collection of essays reprinted in 1985, pg. 217) “Probably it is better to put off using words as long as possible and get one's meaning as clear as one can through pictures and sensations. Afterward one can choose -- not simply accept -- the phrases that will best cover the meaning, and then switch round and decide what impressions one's words are likely to make on another person. This last effort of the mind cuts out all stale or mixed images, all prefabricated phrases, needless repetitions, and humbug and vagueness generally. But one can often be in doubt about the effect of a word or a phrase, and one needs rules that one can rely on when instinct fails. I think the following rules will cover most cases: (i)
 
 Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print. (ii)
 
 Never use a long word where a short one will do. (iii) If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out. (iv)
 
 Never use the passive where you can use the active. (v)
 
 Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent. …” -- George Orwell, Politics and the English Language (1946)

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