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Introduction to Chemical Engineering Processes

Introduction to Chemical Engineering Processes

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Published by: Krishnakumar Anna Jothikumar on Apr 18, 2013
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04/18/2013

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Introduction to Chemical EngineeringProcesses/Print Version
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Contents
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1 Chapter 1: Prerequisites 
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1.1 Consistency of units 
 
1.1.1 Units of Common Physical Properties 
 
1.1.2 SI (kg-m-s) System 
 
1.1.2.1 Derived units from the SI system 
 
1.1.3 CGS (cm-g-s) system 
 
1.1.4 English system 
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1.2 How to convert between units 
 
1.2.1 Finding equivalences 
 
1.2.2 Using the equivalences 
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1.3 Dimensional analysis as a check on equations 
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1.4 Chapter 1 Practice Problems 
 
2 Chapter 2: Elementary mass balances 
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2.1 The "Black Box" approach to problem-solving 
 
2.1.1 Conservation equations 
 
2.1.2 Common assumptions on the conservation equation 
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2.2 Conservation of mass 
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2.3 Converting Information into Mass Flows - Introduction 
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2.4 Volumetric Flow rates 
 
2.4.1 Why they're useful 
 
2.4.2 Limitations 
 
2.4.3 How to convert volumetric flow rates to mass flow rates 
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2.5 Velocities 
 
2.5.1 Why they're useful 
 
2.5.2 Limitations 
 
2.5.3 How to convert velocity into mass flow rate 
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2.6 Molar Flow Rates 
 
2.6.1 Why they're useful 
 
2.6.2 Limitations 
 
2.6.3 How to Change from Molar Flow Rate to Mass Flow Rate 
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2.7 A Typical Type of Problem 
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2.8 Single Component in Multiple Processes: a Steam Process 
 
2.8.1 Step 1: Draw a Flowchart 
 
2.8.2 Step 2: Make sure your units are consistent 
 
 
2.8.3 Step 3: Relate your variables 
 
2.8.4 So you want to check your guess? Alright then read on. 
 
2.8.5 Step 4: Calculate your unknowns. 
 
2.8.6 Step 5: Check your work. 
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2.9 Chapter 2 Practice Problems 
 
3 Chapter 3: Mass balances on multicomponent systems 
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3.1 Component Mass Balance 
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3.2 Concentration Measurements 
 
3.2.1 Molarity 
 
3.2.2 Mole Fraction 
 
3.2.3 Mass Fraction 
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3.3 Calculations on Multi-component streams 
 
3.3.1 Average Molecular Weight 
 
3.3.2 Density of Liquid Mixtures 
 
3.3.2.1 First Equation 
 
3.3.2.2 Second Equation 
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3.4 General Strategies for Multiple-Component Operations 
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3.5 Multiple Components in a Single Operation: Separation of Ethanol and Water 
 
3.5.1 Step 1: Draw a Flowchart 
 
3.5.2 Step 2: Convert Units 
 
3.5.3 Step 3: Relate your Variables 
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3.6 Introduction to Problem Solving with Multiple Components and Processes 
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3.7 Degree of Freedom Analysis 
 
3.7.1 Degrees of Freedom in Multiple-Process Systems 
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3.8 Using Degrees of Freedom to Make a Plan 
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3.9 Multiple Components and Multiple Processes: Orange Juice Production 
 
3.9.1 Step 1: Draw a Flowchart 
 
3.9.2 Step 2: Degree of Freedom analysis 
 
3.9.3 So how to we solve it? 
 
3.9.4 Step 3: Convert Units 
 
3.9.5 Step 4: Relate your variables 
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3.10 Chapter 3 Practice Problems 
 
4 Chapter 4: Mass balances with recycle 
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4.1 What Is Recycle? 
 
4.1.1 Uses and Benefit of Recycle 
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4.2 Differences between Recycle and non-Recycle systems 
 
4.2.1 Assumptions at the Splitting Point 
 
4.2.2 Assumptions at the Recombination Point 
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4.3 Degree of Freedom Analysis of Recycle Systems 
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4.4 Suggested Solving Method 
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4.5 Example problem: Improving a Separation Process 
 
4.5.1 Implementing Recycle on the Separation Process 
 
4.5.1.1 Step 1: Draw a Flowchart 
 
4.5.1.2 Step 2: Do a Degree of Freedom Analysis 
 
4.5.1.3 Step 3: Devise a Plan and Carry it Out 
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4.6 Systems with Recycle: a Cleaning Process 
 
 
4.6.1 Problem Statement 
 
4.6.2 First Step: Draw a Flowchart 
 
4.6.3 Second Step: Degree of Freedom Analysis 
 
4.6.4 Devising a Plan 
 
4.6.5 Converting Units 
 
4.6.6 Carrying Out the Plan 
 
4.6.7 Check your work  
 
5 Chapter 5: Mass/mole balances in reacting systems 
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5.1 Review of Reaction Stoichiometry 
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5.2 Molecular Mole Balances 
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5.3 Extent of Reaction 
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5.4 Mole Balances and Extents of Reaction 
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5.5 Degree of Freedom Analysis on Reacting Systems 
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5.6 Complications 
 
5.6.1 Independent and Dependent Reactions 
 
5.6.1.1 Linearly Dependent Reactions 
 
5.6.2 Extent of Reaction for Multiple Independent Reactions 
 
5.6.3 Equilibrium Reactions 
 
5.6.3.1 Liquid-phase Analysis 
 
5.6.3.2 Gas-phase Analysis 
 
5.6.4 Special Notes about Gas Reactions 
 
5.6.5 Inert Species 
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5.7 Example Reactor Solution using Extent of Reaction and the DOF 
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5.8 Example Reactor with Equilibrium 
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5.9 Introduction to Reactions with Recycle 
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5.10 Example Reactor with Recycle 
 
5.10.1 DOF Analysis 
 
5.10.2 Plan and Solution 
 
5.10.3 Reactor Analysis 
 
5.10.4 Comparison to the situation without the separator/recycle system 
 
6 Chapter 6: Multiple-phase systems, introduction to phase equilibrium 
 
7 Chapter 7: Energy balances on non-reacting systems 
 
8 Chapter 8: Combining energy and mass balances in non-reacting systems 
 
9 Chapter 9: Introduction to energy balances on reacting systems 
 
10 Appendix 1: Useful Mathematical Methods 
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10.1 Mean and Standard Deviation 
 
10.1.1 Mean 
 
10.1.2 Standard Deviation 
 
10.1.3 Putting it together 
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10.2 Linear Regression 
 
10.2.1 Example of linear regression 
 
10.2.2 How to tell how good your regression is 
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10.3 Linearization 
 
10.3.1 In general 
 
10.3.2 Power Law 
 
10.3.3 Exponentials 

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