Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
14Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
PinholeCameraObscura

PinholeCameraObscura

Ratings: (0)|Views: 868|Likes:
Published by BSulli

More info:

Published by: BSulli on Mar 29, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/11/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 W 
hen I was about 12, I made my firstpinhole camera from a Quaker Oats con-tainer, a scrap of tin foil and electrical tape.I took a picture of a sculpture at a localcommunity college, developed the filmand was intoxicated with the results. Becausethe film had been curved against the backof the oatmeal container, thephoto was wildlydistorted—itlooked like thesidewalk aroundthe sculpture wasleaping into the sky.A few months ago I sawsome wooden pinhole camerasfor sale in a photographic supplies cat-alog. I briefly thought about ordering oneuntil I saw the price, about $100, plus youhad to buy the film back. Ouch. So I didwhat any self-respecting woodworker woulddo. I headed for the shop.This pinhole camera is my fourth pro-totype. I first played around with trying tobuild one that would take Polaroid film (amessy disaster). Then I toyed with medi-um-format 120 film (too much engineer-ing). Finally, I decided simplicity was best.This camera uses a 4" x 5" film back thatholds two pieces of 4" x 5" sheet film. Youload the film into the film back in a darkcloset. Then you put the plastic film backinto the camera. When you’re ready tomake a picture, you remove what’s calleda “dark slide,” and this begins the expo-sure. To stop the exposure, you replace thedark slide. Then you take the film to thelab. The film isn’t cheap (about $2 a shot),but the quali-ty makes up for the price.You can enlarge 4" x 5"s to an im-pressive size. Here’s how to make your owncamera:
Make the Pinhole
When building a pinhole camera, one of the most important things is the distancebetween the pinhole and the film. This iscalled the “focal length.” For every sizepinhole, there is an optimal focal length.If your focal length isn’t correct, your imagewill be blurrier than it should be. This cam-era uses a pinhole that is .016" in diame-ter (about
1
 ⁄ 
64
"). The focal length is (andI hate to do this to you) 120 millimeters.If you’re not daring, you can order a set of a dozen pre-cut pinhole apertures from thecompany listed in the supplies box. Ormake your own by poking a hole in a verythin piece of 1
1
 ⁄ 
2
" x 1
1
 ⁄ 
2
" aluminum sheetmetal with a needle. Examine your progresswith a magnifying glass. When your holeis
1
 ⁄ 
64
", file the burr off the exit hole.
Build the Box
Simple stuff here. The top and bottom areglued into rabbets in the sides. The frontis attached using cleats. The back is hingedand also rests in rabbets in the sides. Beginby cutting your pieces to size. Cut
1
 ⁄ 
2
" x
1
 ⁄ 
4
"rabbets on three edges of both side pieces.Glue the top and bottom into the rabbets,clamp and let dry. Now put the film backin place and mark where the three “filmholders” will go. These hold the film backin place when you shut the back of thecamera. Glue the holders in place. Addlightweight foam weather-stripping to theholders and the back edge of the top. Thesewill help seal out light and give you a tight
Build your ownworking camerathis weekend.
byChristopherSchwarz
Pinhole 
CAMERA

Activity (14)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
Baro Kurosawa liked this
Antri.An liked this
longe_emmanuel liked this
longe_emmanuel liked this
longe_emmanuel liked this
longe_emmanuel liked this
rinaldcaraka liked this
papirojedec liked this
scribd264 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->