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International Fusion Fact Sheet

International Fusion Fact Sheet

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Policymakers are often searching for ways to break America’s addiction to fossil fuels and develop innovative technologies that can lead American industry over the long-term.

Fusion power offers such a promise – the potential to harness clean, safe, secure and abundant power for generations. Successfully developing fusion power will also offer other benefits: the establishment of a high-tech industry that will bring vast new streams of revenue to America’s leading companies; spin-off innovations in robotics, supercomputers, and superconducting materials; the creation of an exportable technology that can capture a portion of the $37 trillion in energy investment required over the coming decades; and global leadership in a transformational new industry.

Because of this potential, It is no surprise that more and more countries are investing in fusion power.

Some of the U.S.’s leading high-tech competitors – China, Japan, South Korea, Russia, Germany and France – are making aggressive investments in this space.

ASP’s fact sheet, “International Progress on Fusion Energy” outlines the steps other countries are taking in developing fusion energy.

Meanwhile, the U.S. is considering budget cuts to its fusion program, which will cause irreparable harm to the development of fusion power.

The United States has traditionally played a leading role in fusion power research and development.

If the U.S. fails to invest in fusion research, while the rest of the world makes rapid strides, America will fall behind.

We can restore America’s leadership in fusion power. It will require a national commitment. ASP’s White Paper, “Fusion Power: A 10 Year Plan to Energy Security,” provides a detailed roadmap on how to get there.
Policymakers are often searching for ways to break America’s addiction to fossil fuels and develop innovative technologies that can lead American industry over the long-term.

Fusion power offers such a promise – the potential to harness clean, safe, secure and abundant power for generations. Successfully developing fusion power will also offer other benefits: the establishment of a high-tech industry that will bring vast new streams of revenue to America’s leading companies; spin-off innovations in robotics, supercomputers, and superconducting materials; the creation of an exportable technology that can capture a portion of the $37 trillion in energy investment required over the coming decades; and global leadership in a transformational new industry.

Because of this potential, It is no surprise that more and more countries are investing in fusion power.

Some of the U.S.’s leading high-tech competitors – China, Japan, South Korea, Russia, Germany and France – are making aggressive investments in this space.

ASP’s fact sheet, “International Progress on Fusion Energy” outlines the steps other countries are taking in developing fusion energy.

Meanwhile, the U.S. is considering budget cuts to its fusion program, which will cause irreparable harm to the development of fusion power.

The United States has traditionally played a leading role in fusion power research and development.

If the U.S. fails to invest in fusion research, while the rest of the world makes rapid strides, America will fall behind.

We can restore America’s leadership in fusion power. It will require a national commitment. ASP’s White Paper, “Fusion Power: A 10 Year Plan to Energy Security,” provides a detailed roadmap on how to get there.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: The American Security Project on Apr 23, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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www.AmericanSecurityProject.org1100 New York Avenue, NW Suite 710W Washington, DC
International Progress onFusion Energy 
How American Leadership is Slipping 
Teodore J. MacDonald April 2013
Introduction
In the past hal-century, signicant advances have been made in attempting to harness usionor energy.From the construction o the rst usion “tokamak” device, built in Novosibirsk in 1968to current state-o-the-art acilities like the National Ignition Facility (NIF), operational atLawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Caliornia since 2009, to the next-generationprojects like the Wendelstein 7-X project in Germany, scheduled to begin operation in 2014,usion research is attempting to turn scientic theory into a technological reality.It is thus no surprise that more and more countries are investing in usion power.Te United States has traditionally played a leading role in usion power research anddevelopment. Te skill and knowledge o America’s usion scientists are second to none.However, without new investment, there is a danger that America’s role as a leader in usionpower research is slipping as other countries seek to develop usion.Currently, the most modern and advanced research machines are located outside o theUnited States. In less than a decade, America’s competitors will have more acilities that area generation ahead o those in the United States. We are in danger o ceding scientic andintellectual leadership in the eld o usion power.Tis act sheet will examine usion power capabilities across the world.Several countries in particular—Germany, France, Russia, China, Japan, and South Korea—are making signicant investments into usion power. Tese countries have ambitious plansor usion power development, and they are investing signicant time and money into theseprojects.
 
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 AMERICAN SECURITY PROJECT
Te European Union
Tough not a country, the European Union is a leading entity to help nanceand develop a number o usion projects throughout Europe.
International Termonuclear Experimental Reactor (IER)
•
Located in Cadarache, France, IER is a magnetic connement usion project that is being undedand developed by the EU, China, South Korea, Japan, Russia, India, and the United States. Its esti-mated cost is 13 billion Euros.
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•
Out o 13 billion Euros, 45% is nanced by the EU, and theother 55% is split equally between the remaining six coun-tries.
•
Te lion’s share (an estimated 90%) o contributions will bedelivered “in-kind.” Tat means that in the place o cash, theMembers will construct and deliver components and build-ings directly to the IER Organization.
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•
Te U.S. is a ull partner, and by leveraging only a 9% contri-bution, American scientists will benet rom all the scienticand engineering experience gained rom the IER experiment.
France
France is a leading country or usion research and it is the site o the IER project. In addition, the French military is developing laser usion or thepurposes o weapons research.
Laser Megajoule (L.M.J.)
•
Located in Bordeaux, the French Commissariat a l‘Energie Atom-ique (CEA) operates the 240-beam Laser Megajoule project.
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It issimilar to the NIF project in the United States.
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•
Its main purpose is to guarantee the saety and reliability o Frenchnuclear weapons. Construction began in 2002.
•
Te project costs about 1.5 billion Euros. Once operational in 2014,Laser Megajoule will ocus on producing high energy targets andultimately obtain ignition.
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Te proposed IER design. Source:http:// www.iter.orTe Laser Megajoule Project. Source:http:// www.isa11.org/isa_pictures/site/image/LMJ-tour-big.jpg 
 
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ore Supra 
•
Located in Cadarache, ore Supra is a joint CEA-European Atomic Energy Community (EURA-OM) project.
•
Te ore Supra reached rst plasma in 1988. It holds the world record or plasma discharge time,lasting six and a hal minutes.
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Te United Kingdom
Te UK has a long history in usion research, dating back to the 1920s.Te UK hosts the Joint European orus, which is one o the world’s most importanttokamaks.
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 Joint European orus (JE)
•
Located in Oxordshire, JE is currently the largest and most powerultokamak in the world. It began operating in 1983 and has since been up-graded.
•
Some o the milestones at JE have included the world’s rst controlledrelease o deuterium-tritium usion power (1991) and the world record orusion power (16 megawatts in 1997).
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Mega Amp Spherical okamak (MAS)
•
 Also located in Oxordshire, MAS is a spherical tokamak.
•
 Along with NSX – a complementary experiment at the PrincetonPlasma Physics Laboratory – MAS is one o the world’s two lead-ing spherical tokamaks (Ss).
Te Joint European orus. Source:http://www.cce.ac.uk/introduction.aspx Te Mega Amp Sphericalokamak. Source:http://www.usenet.eu/node/234

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