Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Dr. David E. Herrington, Invited Guest Editor, NATIONAL FORUM OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION JOURNAL Published Article: NFEAS JOURNAL, 30(3) 2013

Dr. David E. Herrington, Invited Guest Editor, NATIONAL FORUM OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION JOURNAL Published Article: NFEAS JOURNAL, 30(3) 2013

Ratings: (0)|Views: 3 |Likes:
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Editor-in-Chief, NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS (Since 1982)

Dr. David E. Herrington, Invited Guest Editor, NATIONAL FORUM OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION JOURNAL

Published Article: NFEAS JOURNAL, 30(3) 2013
Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Editor-in-Chief, NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS (Since 1982)

Dr. David E. Herrington, Invited Guest Editor, NATIONAL FORUM OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION JOURNAL

Published Article: NFEAS JOURNAL, 30(3) 2013

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: William Allan Kritsonis on Apr 23, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOCX, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/23/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 NATIONAL FORUM OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION JOURNALVOLUME 30, NUMBER 3, 2013
50
LEADER AS MENTOR & COACH:CREATING A CULTURE OFEXCELLENCE AND DIGNITY
David E. Herrington, Ph.D.Professor and Coordinator of Leadership ProgramsTexas A&M University-San Antonio
 
ABSTRACTAdult pro-social behavior in school settings and exemplary performance bystudents on a campus are related. They hold in common a thread of expectationin which ethical thinking and behavior are articulated, modeled, coached, andconsistently promoted by the leader. When a proactive, ethical school culture isconceived, created and maintained, bully-free work places come into existence.This is the kind of place where principals can lead a focused, collaborative work group that yields the highest levels of productivity and excellence. Expectationsof what one is able to achieve and what behaviors are expected to take placemake all the difference. In the words of former football coach Mike Leach
“You’re either coaching it, or allowing it to happen” (Leach, 2011, p. 136).
Leadership matters when it comes to shaping cultures that value the dignity of the individual, social justice, and excellence of thought and action.
Introduction
The principal of a school campus makes a difference. The principal sets the tone. The principal determines whether the campus isa supportive and caring place or one that is hostile and divided. The principal establishes norms of interpersonal communication and trust.Principals have multiple opportunities each day to inspire teachers tohigher levels of effort and learning. They can also discourage anddemotivate teachers. Great principals inspire great teachers when theycreate a safe, dignified workplace where excellence and social justiceare consistently acknowledged and coached. Coaching teachers,
 
DAVID E. HERRINGTON
51
 
leading innovation, achieving turn-arounds have one thing in common-- committed leaders who consistently articulate the difference between excellence and mediocrity and who nurture a culture of social justice. To change a culture Dodd (2005, March) suggested that theleader let the faculty and staff 
“know his core values that will guide
hi
s decisions…[and establish] that
there will be clear lines of comm
unication” (p. 90).
Bass (1985) in his early formulations of transformational leadership noted the importance of intellectualstimulation, the ability to reframe reality for subordinates.Inspirational leadership he saw as a way to appeal to the better side of  people to move them to higher levels of thinking and achievement. Inany case, to create a culture of excellence and social justice involves alot of work. It will not happen by accident. Reframing the context and
resetting teachers‟ views of themse
lves, their students, and the verynature of their work requires multiple influence attempts at manylevels each day.When a leader can inspire a new vision of what is possible,when the mindful leader makes the workplace a safe place tochallenge assumptions and introduce new ways of thinking, thesubordinates are freed to question unproductive processes and procedures. In a school campus, increased awareness of what is possible to think and do leads to higher levels of ethical reasoning andcommitment to the welfare and learning of each child. When teachersknow and truly realize that greater effort and commitment will lead tohigher levels of student performance, they will come to understandthat they are improving the quality of their own lives as well as thelives of their students. When the leader as change agent creates aculture that inspires whole-hearted, passionate, committed effort, he isconsidered a transformational leader (Bennis & Nanus, 1985; Bass,1985).
During the 1960‟s, like many of m
y peers, I grew up hearingabout and reading the inspirational writer Norman Vincent Peale. Inhis popular work 
The Power of Positive Thinking,
Peale touted the roleof expectations in bringing about higher levels human achievement:
 
52
NATIONAL FORUM OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION JOURNAL
 
Expecting the best means that you put your whole heart, thecentral essence of your personality, into what you want toaccomplish. People are defeated in life not because of lack of ability, but for lack of wholeheartedness. They do notwholeheartedly expect to succeed. Their 
heart isn‟t in it, which
is to say they themselves are not fully given. Results do notyield themselves to the person who refuses to give himself tothe desired results. (Peale, 1952, p. 90 )There is tremendous power in changing the way individuals seethemselves. To set the tone for 
“what is expected around here” within
a campus can be pivotal in how a group comes to function. Teachersas leaders of students come to realize this power. Principals as leadersof teachers have the same power.My understanding of this powerful principle of setting a positive tone of expectation and social justice came during my firstfew weeks of public school teaching. When I first started teaching in
the 1970‟s, it was before inclusion was practiced extensively. We
had
a tracking system for children that placed them in a “slow learner”
track if they had not demonstrated ability to learn things quickly. Thisarchaic system both created and reinforced lack of expectation in whatthe child might capable of achieving. Low expectation affectedteachers, parents, and the children. When children lacked confidencein their ability they came to doubt their value as learners. I will never forget what happened on my first day in the classroom. It was rightafter lunch in a junior high school that occupied the historic Tivy HighSchool building. My class roster for fourth period was on the rostrumat the front of the classroom. In bold red letters the word
„REMEDIAL‟ was stamped
at the top of the class roster. As thechildren came in to be seated, I was greeting students as they enteredthe classroom. A young girl, scanning the classroom to see who elsehad been placed in the room with her,
 blurted out “We‟re the dumbones aren‟t we, teacher?”
I was surprised to hear that but also quick 
to respond, “No,” I said, “You‟re the best class I have!”
I am thankfulthat I was ready for that. That statement proved to be prophetic as I

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->