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Frey Ch1 On the Nature of Electromagnetic Field Interactions With Biological Systems 1996

Frey Ch1 On the Nature of Electromagnetic Field Interactions With Biological Systems 1996

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Chapter 1. Frey, A. (1996). On the Nature of Electromagnetic Field Interactions with Biological Systems. Springer.

http://www.amazon.com/Electromagnetic-Interactions-Biological-Systems-Intelligence/dp/3540600752
Chapter 1. Frey, A. (1996). On the Nature of Electromagnetic Field Interactions with Biological Systems. Springer.

http://www.amazon.com/Electromagnetic-Interactions-Biological-Systems-Intelligence/dp/3540600752

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Published by: MA-Doc on Apr 24, 2013
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07/03/2013

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On the nature of electromagnetic field interactions with biologicalsystems.Allan H FreyChapter 1
 
OVERVIEW AND PERSPECTIVE
Allan H. Frey
 
In recent years, a body of data on the interactions of exogenousand endogenous electromagnetic fields with biological systems has beengathered which is profoundly changing our understanding of biologicalfunction.
 
This book is intended to provide the reader with: 1) anintegration of many of the findings from this research that bear on thenature of the interactions of electromagnetic fields with biologicalsystems, 2) a summarization of much of the cutting edge work on themechanisms and 3) an indication of its significance for biology.
 
The significance for biology can be understood if the readerconsiders that if one used electromagnetic energy sensors to view theworld from space 100 years ago, the world would have looked quitedim.
 
Now, the world glows with electromagnetic (em) energy emissions
 
at most frequencies of the nonionizing portion of the spectrum. It wouldbe incredible and beyond belief if these electromagnetic fields did notaffect the electrochemical systems we call living organisms.
 
And sinceliving organisms have only so recently found themselves immersed inthis new and increasingly ubiquitous environment, they have not hadopportunity to adapt to it.
 
This gives us, as biologists, the opportunity touse exogenous em fields as probes to study the functioning of livingsystems.
 
We now also have a new technology to study endogenous emfields.
 
This is exciting since new approaches to studying living systemsso often provides the means to make great leaps in science.
 
Specifically, living organisms are complex electrochemicalsystems that evolved over millions of years in a world with a relativelyweak magnetic field and with few electromagnetic energy emitters.
 
Asis characteristic of living organisms, they interacted with and adapted totheir environment of electric and magnetic fields.
 
One example of thisadaptation is the visual system, which is exquisitely sensitive toemissions in the very narrow portion of the em spectrum that we calllight.
 
Organisms, including humans, also adapted by using em energy toregulate various critical cellular systems; we see this in the complex of circadian rhythms.
 
Fish, birds, and higher animals developed systems to
 
use electromagnetic fields to sense prey and to navigate.
 
Electromagnetic fields are also involved in neural membrane function;even protein conformation involves the interactions of electrical fields.
 
But as has often been the case in the history of science, thoughthese were interesting observations, they were disconnected bits andpieces that made no real impact; they didn't fit the frame of reference of the time.
 
Further, the technology and techniques needed to do muchwith the information did not exist.
 
Thus, the very broad importance of the interactions of electromagnetic fields with biological systems wasnot really recognized.
 
But that was yesterday.
 
Now, as James Burke
1
 
might put it, is (figuratively) the day the Universe changed.
Organization of the chapters
 
In the next chapter, the second, I integrate many of the abovementioned disconnected bits and pieces and show how they areexpressions of a common theme.
 
In this way, I provide a context orstructure for viewing the information provided in the following chapters.
 
The third chapter is a review, from the biophysical standpoint, of databearing on cell mechanisms.
 
The authors of the fourth through sixthchapters provide models for mechanisms at the cell membrane, some

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