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Military Resistance 11D11: Rats Flee

Military Resistance 11D11: Rats Flee

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Published by paola pisi
It’s a street like most others in the commercial core of this capital: not really a street at all but a bowl of mud soup thickened with mounds of dirt and gravel. Drivers, accustomed to years of navigating Kabul’s wretched roads, splash through puddles and slalom around potholes.Although the United States and its international partners shoveled billions of dollars into Kabul’s coffers for 11 years, Shah Bobo Jan Street is unpaved — just
one small stretch of more than 900 miles of city roads and alleys that remain
largely dirt. That’s the equivalent of a straightaway running from Washington to Des Moines. For many Kabul residents, that provides reason for even more cynicism about a U.S.-led nation-building venture. In their eyes, it has created a corrupt and indifferent government that leaves thecommon people literally in the dirt — with roads that generate choking dust in the
summer and rivers of muck during winter’s snow melt and heavy rain ...
It’s a street like most others in the commercial core of this capital: not really a street at all but a bowl of mud soup thickened with mounds of dirt and gravel. Drivers, accustomed to years of navigating Kabul’s wretched roads, splash through puddles and slalom around potholes.Although the United States and its international partners shoveled billions of dollars into Kabul’s coffers for 11 years, Shah Bobo Jan Street is unpaved — just
one small stretch of more than 900 miles of city roads and alleys that remain
largely dirt. That’s the equivalent of a straightaway running from Washington to Des Moines. For many Kabul residents, that provides reason for even more cynicism about a U.S.-led nation-building venture. In their eyes, it has created a corrupt and indifferent government that leaves thecommon people literally in the dirt — with roads that generate choking dust in the
summer and rivers of muck during winter’s snow melt and heavy rain ...

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Published by: paola pisi on Apr 24, 2013
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11/05/2013

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Military Resistance:thomasfbarton@earthlink.net 4.21.13
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Military Resistance 11D11
 
[Black Agenda Report]
 AFGHANISTAN WAR REPORTS
Rats Flee The Sinking Shit:
Wealthy Are Buying SecondHomes Abroad And Moving Huge Amounts Of Money Out Of  Afghanistan, Fearing That SecurityWill Deteriorate
Members Of The Elite Scramble ToMove Their Families And Assets OutOf The Country
 
As Many As 40% Of Afghan DiplomatsDon't Return From Overseas Postings
 April 2, 2013 By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times [Excerpts]. Special correspondentHashmat Baktash contributed to this report.KABUL, Afghanistan — Nabil Ahmad was at his desk at a logistics support firm lastspring when an explosion ripped through the office.Windows shattered. The ceiling collapsed. "I thought it was an earthquake — or theend of the world," the Kabul native said. At 26, Ahmad, who favors Western suits and now works for a cellphone service provider,has never known a time when his country was not at war. But he's a father now, with a2-year-old and an infant to think about."I don't want to put my sons in the position that I was growing up," he said."I want to get my family out."
The wealthy are buying second homes abroad and moving huge amounts of money out of Afghanistan, fearing that security will deteriorate and the economywill collapse.Others are applying to study overseas, seeking invitations from relatives abroador risking their lives trying to get into countries illegally.
Some travel agents say they can arrange invitation letters from families in far-off countries to support visa applications. Others claim to have embassy contacts who willissue visas under the table. But it's expensive and they don't always deliver.For the first time in a decade, officials with the International Organization for Migrationbelieve that more Afghans left their country last year than moved back.
Prices for high-end real estate in Kabul have plummeted by as much as 50% asmembers of the business and political elite scramble to move their families andassets out of the country.
"Everything has stopped," said Elyas Faizi of Blue House Real Estate. "No one can sell.No one is buying."Some of his clients are snapping up apartments and villas in Dubai on the Persian Gulf,where wealthy Afghans have long sought sanctuary. The number of Afghans buyingproperty there jumped in 2011 and 2012, many paying in cash, according to localbrokers."I think they wanted to have a Plan B in place," said Parvees Gafur, chief executive of Propsquare Real Estate in the United Arab Emirates.
 
 At least $4.6 billion in cash, the equivalent of about a quarter of Afghanistan'sannual economic output, was carried out of the country on flights to Dubai andelsewhere in 2011, according to the central bank.The government believes that some of the money was diverted from foreignassistance or was the product of illicit drug deals.
It now limits to $20,000 the amount passengers can carry.But officials have also noted an increase in overseas bank transfers, said central bankGov. Noorullah Delawari.
No one knows how much more is leaving the country without being declared.
In one of Kabul's new shopping malls, Hajrat, who like many Afghans uses only onename, has been running a cosmetics store since high school. Now in his early 20s, hemakes enough money to pay for a car and expensive holidays in Dubai.He would seem to have every reason to stay. But he plans to invest his savings inanother country, one where he doesn't have to "worry about suicide attacks all the time."
 As many as 40% of Afghan diplomats don't return from overseas postings,according to the parliament's Commission on International Affairs.
Students, athletes and others who travel in an official capacity have also failed to return.The number of Afghan asylum applications to 44 industrialized countries surpassed36,600 in 2012, according to provisional figures from the United Nations refugee agency,more than at any time since 2001.Many were trying to enter Europe, with Germany and Sweden among the most sought-after destinations. There were just 204 applications to the United States, which is muchfarther away and viewed as a more difficult place to obtain asylum.
Enterprising fraudsters sell fake letters purporting to contain threats from theTaliban to bolster asylum requests.
But many Afghans don't qualify for refugee status, said International Organization for Migration spokeswoman Aanchal Khurana. So they look for other ways out, both legaland illegal.Mohammad Nasir, a 25-year-old Kabul travel agent, fields frequent inquiries — 10 or 20a week — from would-be migrants.Most of those seeking Nasir's help are young men hoping for a ticket to a new life in theWest.Nasir said his agency won't do anything illegal, but can help clients obtain visas to Indiaand Pakistan, where they may hire smugglers to get them to Australia, usually viaMalaysia and Indonesia. Others, he said, fly to Turkey or Russia and try to sneak intothe European Union.

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