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Movie Speak

Movie Speak

Ratings:

4.91

(211)
|Views: 6,151 |Likes:
Published by Workman Publishing
When is "groucho" not a comedian? A "seagull" not a bird? A "banana" not a fruit, and a "taco cart" not a food stand? What's the "Castle rock rule" and when should you call for a "buff & puff"? And why expect trouble when the A.D. (assistant director) knowingly mumbles "Gone With the Wind in the morning, Dukes of Hazzard after lunch"? An oral tradition gathered and passed down for more than a hundred years, the language of moviemaking, like other secret lexicons, is the only accepted way of communicating on a set—and is all but unknown to the outside world. Technical, odd, colorful, mysterious, the working language of movies sheds light not only on the hugely complex process of making a film, but on the invisible hierarchies of a set, the unspoken etiquette between cast and crew, and the evolution of a process that's endlessly fascinating.

Movie Speak is a book about language, but through language also a book about what it’s really like to be a director or a producer or an actor or a crew member. An Oscarwinning producer (The Sting), actor (who worked with Spielberg, Coppola, and Sydney Pollock), and director (Five Corners, Flyboys, My Bodyguard, and more), Tony Bill has been on sets for more than 30 years and brings a writer's love of language to this collection of hundreds of film terms. A futz. A cowboy. A Brodkin and a double Brodkin (a.k.a. screamer). Streaks ’n tips, a Lewinsky, Green Acres, rhubarb, a peanut, a Gary Coleman, snot tape, twin buttes, manmaker (and why you can yell for one if needed for a grip, but must whisper if it's for Tom Cruise)—these are the tricks of the trade.
When is "groucho" not a comedian? A "seagull" not a bird? A "banana" not a fruit, and a "taco cart" not a food stand? What's the "Castle rock rule" and when should you call for a "buff & puff"? And why expect trouble when the A.D. (assistant director) knowingly mumbles "Gone With the Wind in the morning, Dukes of Hazzard after lunch"? An oral tradition gathered and passed down for more than a hundred years, the language of moviemaking, like other secret lexicons, is the only accepted way of communicating on a set—and is all but unknown to the outside world. Technical, odd, colorful, mysterious, the working language of movies sheds light not only on the hugely complex process of making a film, but on the invisible hierarchies of a set, the unspoken etiquette between cast and crew, and the evolution of a process that's endlessly fascinating.

Movie Speak is a book about language, but through language also a book about what it’s really like to be a director or a producer or an actor or a crew member. An Oscarwinning producer (The Sting), actor (who worked with Spielberg, Coppola, and Sydney Pollock), and director (Five Corners, Flyboys, My Bodyguard, and more), Tony Bill has been on sets for more than 30 years and brings a writer's love of language to this collection of hundreds of film terms. A futz. A cowboy. A Brodkin and a double Brodkin (a.k.a. screamer). Streaks ’n tips, a Lewinsky, Green Acres, rhubarb, a peanut, a Gary Coleman, snot tape, twin buttes, manmaker (and why you can yell for one if needed for a grip, but must whisper if it's for Tom Cruise)—these are the tricks of the trade.

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Publish date: Jan 8, 2009
Added to Scribd: Mar 30, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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08/21/2013

 
Block-shootLewinskysThe CastleRock RuleCook theOperaBreak itsNeck EastwoodRuleKnock itDownGo Withthe MoneyBuff & PuffGullysuckerDo-si-doMeat AxeSlam CutC47
Banana
 
 Movie Speak
won’t guarantee you a job, but having a knowledge of the industry terms willfool everyone into thinking you own the place.”
 
–Steven Spielberg 
MovieSpeak
How to Talk Like YouBelong on a Film Set
Block-shootLewinskysThe CastleRock RuleBuff & PuffCook theOperaBreak itsNeck Slam CutC47EastwoodRuleKnock itDownGullysuckerDo-si-doMeat AxeGo Withthe MoneyBanana
By Tony Bill
OScar-Winning PrOducer Of 
The STing
 
ConTEnTS
Introduction: Lights! Camera! Diction!
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Glossary
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Baby(spot)—Duvetyne
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21–59
Ear—“Itiswhatitis”
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66–89
JackLord—Muscolight
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Navajoblanket—Sweeten
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Tabletop—Writer
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178–195
Xcopy—Thezone
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Essays
TheDeathoActing
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AskingorDirection
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Intermission
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MailingItIn
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AFew(Kind)WordsonSetiquette
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TheWritingStuf
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Recommended Reading 
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Acknowledgments
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About the Author
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Introduction
Lights!
 
Camera! Diction!
A
little over
a hundred years ago, in 1895, acouple of guys who spoke only French inventedthe movies. Two brothers named Louis and AugusteLumière forever changed the way pictures were lookedat. It happened in a small, dark basement in Paris, wheresome thirty-ve people had been attracted by a sign onthe street that read “Lumière Cinématographe.” No onein the room had any idea of what was about to takeplace. When the lights went down and the screen startedto icker, the people were astounded. They’d never seenanything like it. A dozen years later, in 1907, a lm crew steppedoff a train in downtown Los Angeles. These invadersconsisted of Francis Boggs, the director, and ThomasPersons, who was the cameraman, propman, businessmanager, assistant director, and whatever else wasrequired. They had already shot the interiors of theirlm in Chicago. Now, despite the minor technicality of an entire change of cast, they were to lm the restof it in California. A year later, they nished it—a full

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