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Business Trends_May 2013

Business Trends_May 2013

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Published by: elauwit on Apr 25, 2013
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04/25/2013

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MAY 2013
BITS & BYTES
How to become a zero TV home or office.
PAGE 6
COACH’S CORNER
Lessons from a Girl Scout.
PAGE 2
HEALTH-CARE TRENDS
Can’t stand the heat; get in the office.
PAGE 4
www.sibiztrends.com
STEVE WHITE/Business Trends
The Home Improvement Contractors of Staten Island hosted their second annual Home Show in Center Courtat the Staten Island Mall. Pictured during a ceremonial ribbon-cutting to open the show are, from left, CliffSiegel, Nina Shea, Congressman Michael Grimm, Lana Ruggiero-Seidman, Dave Mangan and Peter Monzi.
HIC’s annual Home Show
Around the Island
Check out photos from recent eventsaround Staten Island.
PAGE 13
By TIM RONALDSON
 Business Trends
Trees are becoming a pain in the bark forStaten Island builders.Onerous regulations and pricey fees for re-moving city-owned trees have made abuilder’s job difficult, at best, and impossible,at worst, according to Michael Schaeffer, aprincipal of Island Engineering Associatesand a board member for the Building Indus-try Association of New York.But perhaps the biggest challenge buildersare facing is the fact that they often have no
 please see
TREES, page 20
Builders have an arboreal problem
By HENRYK J. BEHNKE
The Staten Island Museum
Having recently attended aBloomberg Philanthropies-hostedtwo-day social media workshopby Vayner Media for small- tomedium-sized not-for-profit or-ganizations, I had time to reflecton the topic that is on every mar-keting professional’s mind thesedays: What is the return of ourinvestment in social media - inmy case for a general interest mu-seum?To answer this question, weneed to think of the goals of oursocial media strategy, which formany organizations is to increaseattendance, participation and fi-nancial support. These goals de-termine how we use social media.All too often, we broadcast ourprograms and fundraising ap-peals in the traditional “push” ap-proach, perhaps even using thesame text as in our print materi-als. The result is that the recipi-ents will not “like” us and will not“follow” us.At the Staten Island Museum,the primary goal in social mediais to raise awareness and engagenew audiences. This is in linewith what the team of VaynerMedia pointed out: To succeed insocial media, you want to engagewith your Facebook friends andTwitter community, share inter-
Thedilemmaof socialmedia
 please see
SOCIAL, page 17
 
2
BUSINESS TRENDS — MAY 2013
DOORS ACTING UP?
 WE CAN HELP!(718) 447-7338
Doors Repaired • Door Closers Repaired/ReplacedLocks Installed • Home or BusinessLicensed, bonded, fully insured
Frank-Key Services
97 Quintard Street • Staten Island, NY 10305
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w  i  t  h   s  e  r  v  i  c  e   &   t  h  e  m  e  n  t  i  o  n   o  f    t  h  i  s   a  d  
By BILLY SPARKLE
I recently watched as a clientwas distributing Girl Scout cook-ies to members of his office whohad recently ordered them fromhis daughter. It reminded me of astory I once heard while workingfor Tony Robbins about a girl whohad set the world record for sell-ing the most Girl Scout Cookies. Iwanted to share this story withmy client as accurately as I could,so I went to the Internet to see if Icould find the details. While Icouldn’t locate that particularstory, I did stumble across a fasci-nating article on the LittleBrownie Bakers website (www.lit-tlebrowniebakers.com/girls/how-to-sell-more). This article con-tained the Top Ten Cookie Cus-tomer Facts and proposed thatwhen you know more, you cansell more. In other words, a girlscout – who knew these facts – could increase her capacity to sellmore cookies.I wondered if, by reading thisarticle, my clients and I couldsimilarly increase our capacity toincrease our businesses. Andwhile I won’t be setting forth allthe facts from this article, I willtouch on a couple to see if theyhave an impact.Fact 1: The number one reasonpeople don’t buy Girl Scout cook-ies is that they were never asked!How often have we found our-selves talking to a potential clientabout our products or servicesand never actually got around toasking them to take an action? Itwas almost as if we were waitingfor them to cut us off in the mid-dle of our conversation and say,“I’ll tell you what; give me twentyof those widgets,” or “Let’s startworking together right now.”Here are some specific actionsyou may want to practice askingpeople to take action: schedulinga meeting with you so they canlearn more about what it is youhave to offer; making a commit-ment and actually buying some of your product or hiring you oryour company’s services; intro-ducing you to somebody that theyknow whom they believe couldbenefit from the kind of work youprovide.So remember, the next timeyou’re in front of a potentialclient: Ask them to take an action.The number one reason peopledidn’t is that they simply werenever asked.Fact 2: Customers buy cookiesbecause they love the taste.Give your potential clients a“taste.” Give away your best ideasfor free. That’s what one of my
Lessons from a Girl Scout
COACH’S CORNER
 please see
COACH, page 16

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