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V28N1_54-56_Baker

V28N1_54-56_Baker

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Published by: The Integrated and Well-Planned Campus on Apr 26, 2013
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NOTEWORTHY ARTICLES
Compiled
by
LaurieBaker
ACADEMIC
Hossler,
D.
1999.
Using the Internet in Col-
lege
Admission: Strategic Choices.
Journal
of
College
Admission
(No.
162): 12-19.
Reviews
some
of
the
ways
the Internet
and
CD-ROM
technology
have
affected
recruitment
efforts,
and
considers
somepotential
benefits
and
drawbacks
of their
increased use.
McCabe,
D.,
L.
Klebe
Trevino,
and
K.
Butterfield.
1999.
Academic Integrity inHonor Code and Non-Honor Code Envi-ronments: A Qualitative Investigation.
Journal
of
Higher
Education
70(2): 211-34.Compares institutions with, without,
and
in
the
process
of
implementing
honor
codes;discusses differences
in
students' views
of
academic honesty;
and
suggests
potential
barriers
to
the
success
of
such codes.Neely,
P.
1999.
The
Threats to Liberal ArtsColleges.
Daedalus
128(1):
27--45.
Examines some
of the
threats
to
the
educa-tional aims,
and
perhaps even the existence,ofliberal arts colleges
as
we know them.Talbott,
S.
1999.
Who's Killing Higher
Educa-
tion?
Educom
Review
34 (2): 26-33.Considers effects
of new
technologies
on
curriculum
and
instructional design
in
theInformation
Age.Wagschal,
P.
1998.
Distance Education Comesto the Academy: But Are
We
Asking theRight Questions?
Internet
and
Higher
Edu-cation
1(2): 125-30.
Critiques
the
rush
to
embrace
and
imple-
ment
instructional
technologies
without
considering
whether
they
are appropriate
to
the
curriculum
or
vice versa.
ADMINISTRATIVE
Baird,
L.,
P.
Holland, and
S.
Deacon.
1999.
Learning from Action: Imbedding MoreLearning Into the Performance
Process Fast
Enough to Make a Difference.
Organiza-
tional
Dynamics
27
(4
):
19-32.Discusses
the
U.S. Army's use
ofthe
After
Action
Review, a learn-as-you-go
model
of
performance
that
eschews
the
separa-
tion
of
learning
and
doing.Dass,
P.,
and
B.
Parker.
1999.
Strategies forManaging
Human
Resource Diversity:From Resistance to Learning.
Academy
of
Management
Executive
13(2):
68-80.
Contends
that
organizational approaches
to
diversity
management
depend
on
suchfactors as pressure for,
type
of,
and
atti-tudes toward
diversity,
and
proposes
a
framework
for
developing institution-
specific diversity
management
strategies.Fried,].
1999.
Two
Steps
to
Creative CampusCollaboration.
American Association
for
Higher
Education Bulletin
51(7): 10-12.
Suggests
some
ways faculty
and student
affairs professionals
can join
forces
to
im-prove
student
learning. Service-learning
programs
and
leadership
education
are
cited
as
just two examples.
54
VOLUME
28,
FALL
1999
 
Give,
M.
de, and
S.
Olswang. 1999.
The
Mak-ing
of
a Branch Campus System: A State-wide Strategy ofCoalition Building.
Review
of
Higher
Education
22(3): 287-313.
Delineates
thecreation
of
five
branch
campuses
of
Washington'stwo state uni-
versities, focusing
on
the
coalition-build-
ingefforts
undertaken
at
the
local,
regional,
andstate
levels.Julius, D.,
J.Y.
Baldridge, and
J.
Pfeffer. 1999.A
Memo
From
Machiavelli.
Journal
of
Higher
Education
70(2): 113-33.
In
a
"memo" from Machiavelli,
ten
rulesfor
improving
leadership effectiveness
are
outlined
and
discussed.
FACILITIES
Binsacca,
R.
1999. Battling Water Above and
Below.
Architectural
Record
187(6): 179-86.Reviews five types
of
waterproofing
mate-
rials
and
some
issues
to
consider
when
selecting
among
them.
Mendez, R. 1999. Music Box.
Architectural
Review
205(1226): 68-71.
Highlights
Princeton
University's
new
music
library, a
"modestly spectacular"building
that
successfully
blends
study,rehearsal,
and
office space.Penning-Rowsell,
A.
1999. New Landscapes ofLearning.
Landscape Design
(No.
280):
32-34.
Considers
ways
institutions
can
use
land-scaping
to
revitalize
campus
spaces
evenwhen
resources for
doing
so
are
scarce.Van Cleef,
C.
1999. Earth Science.
Architec-
tural
Review
205(1225): 58-61.
Features
the
new
geophysics
building
at
Utrecht
University,
notable
for
the
archi-
tects'
inventive
use
of
materials
and
sen-
sitivity
to
the
structure's surroundings.Wright, G. 1999. Keeping Facades Safe.
Build-ing Design
and
Construction
40(3): 48-50.
Advocates
the
use
of
hands-on inspection
of
building
facades,
and
discusses
the
supplemental
use
of
a
new robotic
inspec-
tion
method.
FINANCIAL
Ehrenberg,
R.
1999.
No
Longer Forced Out.
Academe
85(3): 35-39.
Examines
the
new
faculty
retirement
pro-
gram
developed
at
Cornell
University
and
some lessons
other
institutions
might
draw
from
its
approach.
Irby,
A.
1999. Postbaccalaureate Certificates:
Higher Education's
Growth
Market.
Change
31(2): 36-41.Considers
the
most
common
types
of
cer-tificate programs, factors influencing
their
growth,
and
some potential possibilities
and
pitfalls for
both
students and
institutions.McPherson,
M.,
and M.O. Schapiro.
1999.
TheFuture Economic Challenges
for
the LiberalArts Colleges.
Daedalus
128(1): 47-75.
Highlights
some difficulties liberal arts
colleges
currently
face
in
terms
of
pricing,
marketing,
and
fiscal
management.
St. John,
E.
1999. Evaluating State
Student
Grant
Programs:
A
Case
Study of
Washington's
Grant
Program.
Research
in
Higher
Education
40(2): 149-69.Examines
the
effects
ofan
increase
in
statefunding
on
students
attending
public four-
year
colleges
and
universities
in the
state
of
Washington,
as well as
the
possibilitiesfor
conducting
similar
studies elsewhere.
PLANNING
FOR
HIGHER EDUCATION
55

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