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V27N4_09-17_Parkyn

V27N4_09-17_Parkyn

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Published by: The Integrated and Well-Planned Campus on Apr 26, 2013
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10/14/2013

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A
small,
rural
college
and
a
large,
urban
university
join
forces
to create
an
innovative
environment
for
learning.
THE
SATEllITE
CAMPUS:
A
COLlABORATIVE
MODEL
David
Lee
P
arkyn
A
college
or
university
cannot
be allthings to all people.
The
small collegecannot entertain the diverse curricular andculturalprogramsofthelargeuniversity; thelarge university cannot extend the sense ofcommunity
and
family-like relationshipsoffered
by
a small college.
The
rural campus
offers
plenty of open space and the quiet
of
the countryside, but the urban campus pro-vides
the
vibrant, eclectic life
of
the
cityboth
day
and night.
The
private college canmaintain strong heritage and kinship tradi-tions; the public university can enhance
its
name recognition through nationally
prominent athletic programs.
Each
institution
has
its
inherent
strengths
and
weaknesses.
Through
mar-keting strategies, colleges and universitiesemphasize their strengths and try to mini-mize
or
even
hide
their
limitations.
At
other
times, however, schools recognizetheir limitations and seek
ways
to respondeffectively to them.
David
Lee
Parkyn
is
executive
assistant
to
the
president and professor
of
religious studies
at
Mes-
siahCollege.
He
holds
a
Ph.D.
from
Boston
College,
an
MDiv. from Gordon-Conwell Theo-logical Seminary,
and
a bachelor's from MessiahCollege.
He
has
been
a faculty member
at
Mes-
siah
since
1981.
The
author
thanks Donald
Wingert, director
ofthe
Philadelphia campus, forhis assistance
in
preparing this article.
One
approach to compensating forcertain campus limitations
is
to
establisha cooperative affiliation with
another
in-stitution.
This
model
is
widely applied
in
study-abroad programs. Rather
than
estab-lish independent programs, institutions inthe United States link with universities in
other
countries to develop study-abroadprograms
that
make use
of the
facilitiesand resources
of
a school in the host coun-try.
Another
example
of
this cooperative
approach
is
the
affiliation
between
se-lected liberal arts colleges and professionalschools
at
major universities. In this ap-proach, students attend the liberal arts col-lege for three years
and
then
transfer fortwo additional years to
the
university
to
complete
an
applied course
of
study, such
as
engineering.
The
students
in
this kind
of
program benefit from study at a liberalarts college
but
also satisfy
their
goal
of
attaining
an
undergraduate degree
inan
applied field.
In
both
of
these examples,
the
affiliation
is
developed
withoutthe
exchange
of
faculty or the construction
of
dedicated facilities.
Another
approach, one that
is
far
less
common, brings together two institutions
when one
school
establishes a satellitecampus
adjacent to and
in
cooperation
with
the other
school.
Since the late
1960s, this collaborative satellite campusmodel has been applied
on
a domestic
basis
PLANNING
FOR
HIGHER EDUCATION
9
 
by
two Pennsylvania institutions: MessiahCollege, a small, private, rural college, andTemple University, a large, public, urbanuniversity. Now celebrating its
30th
anni-versary, this program merits considerationby
other
colleges
and
universities as ameans to make accessible to students
on
Students
benef-t
from
thebest
0/
both
worlds-the
private
and
the public, theurban
and
the
rural,
and
thesmall
and
the
large_
either campus
the
best of
both
worlds-
the
private and
the
public,
the
urban andthe rural, and
the
small and
the
large.Messiah College
is
a private, church-
related
liberal arts college
located in
southern central Pennsylvania.
The
col-lege enrolls nearly 2,700 undergraduatestudents, most of whom come from ethni-cally homogeneous small towns composedoverwhelmingly of middle-class families.Temple University
is
a public universitylocated in
the
heart of Philadelphia.
The
university enrolls more
than
28,000 stu-dents who collectively reflect
the
ethnic
diversity of this country's urban popula-tion.
It
is
hard to describe two schools thatare more different from each
otherthan
Messiah and Temple.Since 1968, Messiah has operated asatellite campus in Philadelphia adjacent
to
and
in cooperation
with
Temple.
Launched
as
a means to expand the cur-ricular opportunities available to students
on
the college's small campus, this programhas challenged, transformed, and equippedmore
than
1,400
of
Messiah's alumni andalumnae during these years.
The
Philadel-phia program brings together the opportu-nities offered by a small
community
of
scholars and
the
educational context of amajor state university. This program pre-sents a viable model for linking two dis-tinct types of campuses and locations.
The
program also provides a model
for
develop-ing approaches to education that encour-age
students to
cross demographic
and
cultural boundaries to study in settings thatoften are considerably different from thoseto which they are accustomed.
The
Satellite
Campus
The
Philadelphia campus of Messiah Col-lege
was
the brainchild of three individu-
als:
President
D.
Ray Hostetter ofMessiah;
Dr.
Albert
J.
Myer, a Mennonite educator;
and the
late Dr. Ernest
L.
Boyer Sr.,
an
alumnus and member
of
Messiah's board
of
trustees
and
then
chancellor of
the
State
University
of
New
York.
When
itwas
initiated in
1968, this cooperativeprogram "was
the
first such arrangementbetween a church-related college
and
asecular
state university
inthe United
States" (Sider 1974).
At
that
time
Messiah
was a verysmall school,
enrolling
fewer
than
500students
on
its main campus, which
is
lo-
cated in
the
village
of
Grantham,
100
miles west
of
Philadelphia.
Messiah
planned to
grow,
however,
on
both
cam-
puses.
By
the early 1970s, the Philadelphiacampus was projected
to
accommodate
one-fourth of
Messiah's
student
body.Long-range plans envisioned a total stu-
dent
body of 1,250 students, with 350 ofthese students housed in a high-rise facil-ity
at the
Philadelphia
campus. Today,total enrollment
at
Messiah has risen tonearly 2,700 full-time undergraduates, but
only
85
of these students
study
at the
Philadelphia campus in any single semes-ter. Clearly, Messiah has grown beyond
the
expectations of
the
early 1970s,
butenrollment at the
satellite campus has
been
morelimited.
Nonetheless,the
Philadelphia campus has been
an
impor-
tant
part
of
Messiah for 30 years.
10
VOLUME
27,
SUMMER
1999
 
 
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.
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Figure
1:
This map
of
the Temple University
main
campus showsthe location
of
theMessiah Collegesatellite campus (see
JEFFERSON
STREET
_
circle
at
upper left).
Messiah initiated
the
collaborative To address its second concern, to in-program
with
Temple University
in
re-crease undergraduate enrollment, Messiahsponse to two particular concerns. First, realized
that
it would need to expand
the
Messiah realized that it needed to prepare college's curriculum. A satellite campus
as-
students to live in a complex world
that
sociated with a major university provided
was
becoming increasingly urban. Most the opportunity
for
this small college
to
es-
students who enrolled at Messiah, however, tablish new academic majors
and
intro-came from rural or small-town settings, and duce new disciplines
to
the
curriculum
Messiah's campus
was
locatedin
a more rapidly and aggressively
than
other-semirural area in Pennsylvania. Might it be wise would have been possible. Throughpossible, leaders at the college wondered, to
the
affiliation with Temple, students en-establish a second campus
that
could di-rolled
at
Messiah could complete selectedrectly address this
issue?
Donald Wingert,
majors
by
studying
for
two years
at
the current
director
of the
Philadelphia Messiah's main campus and
then
take thecampus,
suggests
that the vision
was
to cre-final two years at the Philadelphia campusate "an option which would allow various with a curriculum primarily comprised of'worlds'
toconverge
in
a
combination
courses offered
by
Temple.
The
college in-rarely offered to college
students-the
troduced new majors in areas such
as
busi-small college setting placed within
a'text-
ness administration, computer science,book case'
of
inner-city depression
and
philosophy, psychology, sociology, theater,urban renewal efforts" (Wingert 1994).
modern
languages, and engineering. As
PLANNING
FOR
HIGHEREDUCATION
11

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