Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Joseph Attacked by the Archers.

Joseph Attacked by the Archers.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2 |Likes:
Published by glennpease

BY CHARLES H. SPURGEON


*• Thi uxjhers have sorely giieved him, and shot at him, and hated him;
bat his kow abode in strength ; and the arms of his hands were made strong
by the i ands of the mighty God of Jacob ; from thence is the shepherd,
the sto) e of Isi-ael."— Genesis xlix: 23, 24.

BY CHARLES H. SPURGEON


*• Thi uxjhers have sorely giieved him, and shot at him, and hated him;
bat his kow abode in strength ; and the arms of his hands were made strong
by the i ands of the mighty God of Jacob ; from thence is the shepherd,
the sto) e of Isi-ael."— Genesis xlix: 23, 24.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Apr 27, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/18/2013

pdf

text

original

 
JOSEPH ATTACKED BY THE ARCHERS.BY CHARLES H. SPURGEO*• Thi uxjhers have sorely giieved him, and shot at him, and hated him;bat his kow abode in strength ; and the arms of his hands were made strongby the i ands of the mighty God of Jacob ; from thence is the shepherd,the sto) e of Isi-ael."— Genesis xlix: 23, 24.It must have been a fine sight to see the hoary-headed Jacob sitting up in his bed whilst he bestowedhis parting benediction upon his twelve sons. He hadbeen n ible in many instances during his life — at thesleeping place of Bethel, the brook of Jabbok, and thehalting of Peniel. He had been a glorious old man;one before whom we might bow down with reverence,and truly say, "There were giants in those days." Buthis closing scene was the best. I think if ever he stoodout more illustrious than at any other time, if his headwas at any one season more than another, encircledwith a halo of glory, it was when he came to die. Likethe sun at setting, he seemed then to be the greater inbrilliance, tinging the clouds of bis weakness. with theglory of grace within. Like good wine, which runsclear to the very bottom, unalloyed by dregs, so didJacob till his dying hour continue to sing of love, of mercy, and of goodness, past and future. Like the(192)JOSEPH ATTACKED BY THE ARCHEB8. 193swan, which (as old writers say) singeth not all itslife until it comes to die, so the old patriarch re-mained silent as a songster for many years ; but whenhe stretched himself on his last couch of rest, he stayedbiimself up in his bed, turned his burning eye from oneto another, and although with a hoarse and falteringvoice, he sang a sonnet upon each of his offspring, suchas earthly poets, uninspired, cannot attempt to imitate.Lookhig upon his sou Reuben, a tear was in his eye,for he recollected Reuben's sin ; he passed over Simeonand Levi, giving some slight rebuke; upon the othershe sung a verse of praise, as his eyes saw into the fu^
 
ture history of the tribes. By-and-by his voice failedhim, and the good old man, with long-drawn breath,with eyes pregnant with celestial fire, and heart bigwith heaven, lifted his voice to God, and said, ''I havewaited for thy salvation, O God," rested a moment onhis pillow, and then again sitting up, recommenced thestrain, passing briefly by the names of each. But ohlwhen he came to Joseph, his youngest son but one— when he looked on him, I picture that old man as thetears ran down his cheeks. There stood Joseph, withall his mother Rachel in his eyes — that dear-loved wifeof his — there he stood, the boy for whom that motherhad prayed with all the eagerness of an Eastern wife.For a long twenty years she had tarried a barren wo-man and kept no house, but then she was a joyfulmother, and she called her son "Increase." Oh! howshe loved the boy; and for that mother's sake, thoughshe had been buried for some years, and hidden underthe cold sod, old Jacob loved him too. But more thanthat, he loved him for his troubles. He was partedfrom him to be sold into Egypt. His father recollected1T4 SERMOS.Joseph's trials in the round-house and the dungeon,and remembered his royal dignity as prince of Egypt;and now, with a full burst of harmony, as if the musicof heaven had united with his own, as when thewidened river meets the sea, and the tide coming updoth amalgamate with the stream that cometh down,and swelleth into a broad expanse, so did the glory of heaven meet the rapture of his earthly feelings, andgiving vent to his soul, he sung, "Joseph is a fruitfulbough, even a fruitful bough by a well; whose branchesn;n over the wall; the archers have sorely grieved him,and shot at Mm^ and hated him; but his bow abode instrength, and the arms of his hands were made strongby the hands of the mighty God of Jacob ; (from thenceis the shepherd, the stone of Israel) ; even by the Godof thy father, who shall help thee; and by the Al-mighty, who shall bless thee with blessings of heavenabove, blessings of the deep that lieth under, blessingsof the breasts, and of the womb; the blessings of thyfather have prevailed above the blessings of my pro-genitors, unto the utmost bound of the everlasting
 
hills; they shall be on the head of Joseph, and on thecrown of the head of him that was separate from hisbrethren." What a splendid stanza with which toclose! He has only one more blessing to give; butsurely this was the richest which he conferred on Joseph.Joseph is dead, but the Lord has his Josephs now.There are some still who understand by experience — -and that is the best kind of understanding — the mean-ing of this passage, "The archers have sorely grievedhim, and shot at him, and hated him; but his bowabode in strength, and the arms of his hands were madestrong by the hands of the mighty God of Jacob."JOSEPH ATTACKED BY THE ABCHEBS. 195There are four things for us to consider this morn-ing. First of all, the cruel attack — **the archers havesorely grieved him, and shot at him, and hated him;"secondly, the shielded warrior — ''but his bow abodein strength;" thirdly, his secret strength — ''the armsof his hands were made strong by the mighty powerof the God of Jacob;" and fourthly, the glorious par-allel drawn between Joseph and Christ — "from thenceis the shepherd, the stone of Israel."I. First, then, we commence with the crtiel attcuck."The archers have sorely grieved him." Joseph's en-emies were archers. The original has it, "masters of the arrows; " that is, men who were well skilled in theuse of the arrow. Though all weapons are alike ap-proved by the warrior in his thirst for blood, there seemssomething more cowardly in the attack of the archerthan in that of the swordsman. The sword^nan plantshimself near you, foot to foot, and lets you defendyourself, and deal your blows against him; but thearcher stands at a distance, hides himseK in ambuscade,and, without your knowing it, the arrow comes whiz-zing through the air, and perhaps penetrates your heart.Just so are the enemies of God's people. They veryseldom come foot to foot with us; they will not showtheir faces before us; they hate the light, they lovedarkness ; they dare not come and openly accuse us toour face, for then we could reply; but they shoot thebow from a distance, so that we cannot answer them;cowardly and dastardly as they are, they forge their

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->