Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
My comments to Phil Morris' column on welcoming immigrants to Cleveland

My comments to Phil Morris' column on welcoming immigrants to Cleveland

Ratings: (0)|Views: 17 |Likes:
my comments posted on Clevleand.com to Phil Morris' column on welcoming immigrants to Cleveland: http://www.cleveland.com/morris/index.ssf/2013/04/new_immigrant_talent_will_be_a.html#incart_river_default

"Great column. There are hundreds of stories like Babu's percolating below the surface, waiting to be shared.
In the City of Cleveland, there is increasing recognition of the economic and cultural contributions of immigrants --- and how a multicultural community that values diversity and inclusion is more competitive in a global economy.
This is good.
We need to push further --- in looking at how we can leverage our diversity assets to emerge as a Global City, harvest the fruits of globalization and equitably share this with all Clevelanders.
Personally, I think Cleveland’s sweet spot is to work towards the goal of becoming the “Hotlanta of the North” --- a destination city, like Atlanta, that is known for rich African American AND Immigrant American entrepreneurship and culture. There is room for all --- and we will need the talents of all to stake a position in the hyper-competitive global market.
In fact, John Sibley Butler, Ph.D., the director of entrepreneurship at University of Texas, Austin, an expert in both African American entrepreneurship and Immigrant American Entrepreneurship, has eloquently written that immigrants and African Americans have much in common --- both in suffering from exclusion, and in enjoying a rich tradition in entrepreneurship (did you know that in the early 20th century, the #1 ethnic/racial group in terms of business ownership per capita was African Americans?”).
Why is this important? Because the research demonstrates that startups --- companies less than 5 years old account for nearly all net job creation in American since 1985.
For Cleveland to become an engine of job-creation, and therefore repopulate, we need to re-animate a spirit of entrepreneurship in all of our current and future residents. We need to make heroes of the entrepreneurs. It takes tremendous courage, perseverance and pain to start a business, and make it work.
We will also have to go global (nearly 90% of the world's economic growth in the near future will occur outside the U.S.). We will need to build intercultural and global alliances to sell abroad and invite investment here.
Dr. Butler also writes that he does not but into the notion that immigrants are “takers” and also believes that the urban core of older American cities will be rebuilt by both African American AND immigrant talent.
Btw, for those who still have reservations on the economic contributions of immigrants and how we can leverage immigration as part of our strategy to reboot Cleveland’s economy, check some of this data out:
http://www.renewoureconomy.org/sites/all/themes/pn...
http://www.renewoureconomy.org/sites/all/themes/pn...
http://www.renewoureconomy.org/sites/all/themes/pn...

I suggest that Cleveland leaders contact Dr. Butler, ask him to come to Cleveland (his wife is from here) and help lead this discussion and strategy session.
Time for Clevelanders to unite, work together, and take action."
my comments posted on Clevleand.com to Phil Morris' column on welcoming immigrants to Cleveland: http://www.cleveland.com/morris/index.ssf/2013/04/new_immigrant_talent_will_be_a.html#incart_river_default

"Great column. There are hundreds of stories like Babu's percolating below the surface, waiting to be shared.
In the City of Cleveland, there is increasing recognition of the economic and cultural contributions of immigrants --- and how a multicultural community that values diversity and inclusion is more competitive in a global economy.
This is good.
We need to push further --- in looking at how we can leverage our diversity assets to emerge as a Global City, harvest the fruits of globalization and equitably share this with all Clevelanders.
Personally, I think Cleveland’s sweet spot is to work towards the goal of becoming the “Hotlanta of the North” --- a destination city, like Atlanta, that is known for rich African American AND Immigrant American entrepreneurship and culture. There is room for all --- and we will need the talents of all to stake a position in the hyper-competitive global market.
In fact, John Sibley Butler, Ph.D., the director of entrepreneurship at University of Texas, Austin, an expert in both African American entrepreneurship and Immigrant American Entrepreneurship, has eloquently written that immigrants and African Americans have much in common --- both in suffering from exclusion, and in enjoying a rich tradition in entrepreneurship (did you know that in the early 20th century, the #1 ethnic/racial group in terms of business ownership per capita was African Americans?”).
Why is this important? Because the research demonstrates that startups --- companies less than 5 years old account for nearly all net job creation in American since 1985.
For Cleveland to become an engine of job-creation, and therefore repopulate, we need to re-animate a spirit of entrepreneurship in all of our current and future residents. We need to make heroes of the entrepreneurs. It takes tremendous courage, perseverance and pain to start a business, and make it work.
We will also have to go global (nearly 90% of the world's economic growth in the near future will occur outside the U.S.). We will need to build intercultural and global alliances to sell abroad and invite investment here.
Dr. Butler also writes that he does not but into the notion that immigrants are “takers” and also believes that the urban core of older American cities will be rebuilt by both African American AND immigrant talent.
Btw, for those who still have reservations on the economic contributions of immigrants and how we can leverage immigration as part of our strategy to reboot Cleveland’s economy, check some of this data out:
http://www.renewoureconomy.org/sites/all/themes/pn...
http://www.renewoureconomy.org/sites/all/themes/pn...
http://www.renewoureconomy.org/sites/all/themes/pn...

I suggest that Cleveland leaders contact Dr. Butler, ask him to come to Cleveland (his wife is from here) and help lead this discussion and strategy session.
Time for Clevelanders to unite, work together, and take action."

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Richard Herman, Cleveland Immigration Lawyer on Apr 28, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOCX, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/30/2013

pdf

text

original

 
my comments posted on Clevleand.com to Phil Morris' column on welcoming immigrants to Cleveland:http://www.cleveland.com/morris/index.ssf/2013/04/new_immigrant_talent_will_be_a.html#incart_river_default"Great column. There are hundreds of stories like Babu's percolating below the surface, waiting to beshared.In the City of Cleveland, there is increasing recognition of the economic and cultural contributions of immigrants --- and how a multicultural community that values diversity and inclusion is morecompetitive in a global economy.This is good.We need to push further --- in looking at how we can leverage our diversity assets to emerge as a GlobalCity, harvest the fruits of globalization and equitably share this with all Clevelanders.
Personally, I think Cleveland’s sweet spot is to work towards the goal of becoming the “Hotlanta of theNorth”
--- a destination city, like Atlanta, that is known for rich African American AND ImmigrantAmerican entrepreneurship and culture. There is room for all --- and we will need the talents of all tostake a position in the hyper-competitive global market.In fact, John Sibley Butler, Ph.D., the director of entrepreneurship at University of Texas, Austin, anexpert in both African American entrepreneurship and Immigrant American Entrepreneurship, haseloquently written that immigrants and African Americans have much in common --- both in sufferingfrom exclusion, and in enjoying a rich tradition in entrepreneurship (did you know that in the early 20th
century, the #1 ethnic/racial group in terms of business ownership per capita was African Americans?”).
Why is this important? Because the research demonstrates that startups --- companies less than 5 yearsold account for nearly all net job creation in American since 1985.For Cleveland to become an engine of job-creation, and therefore repopulate, we need to re-animate aspirit of entrepreneurship in all of our current and future residents. We need to make heroes of theentrepreneurs. It takes tremendous courage, perseverance and pain to start a business, and make itwork.We will also have to go global (nearly 90% of the world's economic growth in the near future will occuroutside the U.S.). We will need to build intercultural and global alliances to sell abroad and inviteinvestment here.
Dr. Butler also writes that he does not but into the notion that immigrants are “takers” and also believes
that the urban core of older American cities will be rebuilt by both African American AND immigranttalent.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->