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Derby St. Baldrick's Event

Derby St. Baldrick's Event

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Published by ValleyIndyDotOrg
Derby St. Baldrick's Event
Derby St. Baldrick's Event

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Published by: ValleyIndyDotOrg on Apr 30, 2013
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Why We Exist
Our Mission
The St. Baldrick’s Foundation is a volunteer-driven charity committed to unding the most promisingresearch to fnd cures or childhood cancers and give survivors long and healthy lives.
Childhood Cancer ResearchHow are childhood cancers dierent?
•
Childhood cancers are not related to liestyle actors, and little can be done to prevent them.
•
Many adult cancers can be diagnosed early. In 80% o kids, cancer has already spread to other areaso the body by the time it is diagnosed.
•
Some cancers almost never strike ater the age o 5; others occur most oten in teenagers. Even whenkids get cancers that adults get – like lymphoma – they must be treated dierently.
Children are notsimply smaller adults!
Funding Gap
In 2011, the National Cancer Institute budget was $5.196 billion. Together, all childhood cancers received only3.7% o that.
Media Contact:
 
Traci Shirk, Media & PR Specialist, Media@StBaldricks.org or 626.792.8247 x50
United States...
1 in 5 children diagnosed will
not survive.
O those who survive...
2 out o 3 will suer long-termeects rom treatment.
Emily is a leukemiasurvivor becauseresearch made hertreatments moreeective and lesstoxic. Without moreresearch, many otherswill not survive.Worldwide...
Every 3 minutes a child isdiagnosed with cancer.
Age Impact
There are over a dozenmajor types o childhoodcancers, and countlesssubtypes. Most aredierent rom adultcancers and requireunique treatment.
Research is a child’sbest hope or a cure.
•
One childhood cancerhas a cure rate o 90%
•
Little, i any, progress hasbeen made in many otherchildhood cancers
Research is thedierence. Specializedresearch works, butmore is needed to giveevery child a cure and ahealthy uture.
Inants & ToddlersChildrenTeensYoung Adults
All our groups can get
childhood cancers.
More research is needed togive every child a cure and ahealthy uture.
Emily, 8, St. Baldrick’s 2012 Ambassador 
 
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The ve St. Baldrick’s Foundation 2013 Ambassadors represent the 175,000 children worldwide diagnosedwith childhood cancer each year. Coming rom dierent areas o the U.S. and varying in age, disease type andtreatment status, the Ambassadors are a reminder that childhood cancer doesn’t discriminate and that one in vekids diagnosed in the U.S. each year will not survive.
Matthias, 4, Indiana |Bilateral retinoblastoma, cancer ree
Diagnosed with retinoblastoma in both eyes at 3 ½ months old, Matthias underwent sixmonths o chemotherapy and other treatment therapies. Near the end o his treatment,doctors discovered his main tumors were growing again, along with many seed tumors,orcing doctors to remove Matthias’ eyes beore his rst birthday. Matthias is now a happyand healthy boy who enjoys swimming, climbing and learning to play the piano.
Luke,7, Michigan |Embryonal rhabdomysarcoma, cancer ree
At just 3 years old, Luke was diagnosed with stage IV embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma,a rare cancer o the muscles. He endured nearly 70 weeks o aggressive treatments,including multiple rounds o chemotherapy and daily radiation. Through it all, Lukeremained positive and strong. Today Luke is cancer ree and thriving in rst grade! Hisdays are lled with school, playing Legos and creating Star Wars-related art projects. Thissuperhero’s wish or all kids diagnosed with cancer: “May the Force be with you!”
Avery,9, Nevada |Brain tumor, in treatment
Avery is a spirited and courageous girl who loves to draw, sing, play the piano and createart projects. In June 2011, she was diagnosed with pilocytic astrocytoma, a childhoodbrain tumor. Although Avery is currently undergoing aggressive treatments and has lostperipheral vision, her can-do attitude and tenacity have helped her remain strong. I all goeswell, Avery will complete treatment in the spring o 2013.
Emily,16, Caliornia |Osteosarcoma, in treatment
Dec. 12, 2011, at the age o 15, Emily was diagnosed with chondroblastic osteosarcoma,a cancerous bone tumor. Emily bravely endured more than a year o medical treatment,including 18 rounds o chemotherapy and surgery to remove seven inches o her right tibia.She will be in a wheelchair until March 2013, but her prognosis is positive and she looksorward to being an example to newly diagnosed teens.
Jordan, Forever 17 (11/14/1991 – 11/9/2009), Maryland |Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma
Jordan enjoyed sports, video games and hanging out with his riends. He was also anaccomplished cross-country and track runner. On Jan. 11, 2008, at the age o 16, Jordan’slie changed orever when he was diagnosed with stage IV alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma,a highly malignant sot-tissue cancer in the muscle cells. Despite aggressive treatments,Jordan passed away ve days shy o his 18
th
birthday. Jordan’s positive outlook on lieremains an inspiration to his amily, riends and worldwide network o supporters.Learn more about the 2013 Ambassadors atStBaldricks.org/kids.
Media Contact: 
Traci Shirk, Media & PR Specialist, Media@StBaldricks.org or 626.792.8247 x50
2013 Ambassadors
 
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See the Impact
Childhood Cancer Research Funding
•
St. Baldrick’s has committed more than 103 million USD to liesaving research since 2005.
•
St. Baldrick’s donors and volunteers made possible more than 25 million USD in unding or childhoodcancer research in 2012.
•
In addition to unding the research o pediatric cancer experts, St. Baldrick’s also helps make it possible orthe best and brightest young doctors to pursue childhood cancer research.
•
St. Baldrick’s unds local institutions as well as cooperative research on a national scale to help doctors worktogether to develop the best treatments or all children with cancer.
Grant Review Process
Applications rom childhood cancer researchers are reviewed and rated by the Foundation’s panel o expert scienticadvisors, who make unding recommendations. Final decisions are made by the Foundation’s board o directors.
Grant Types
Benefciary Outside the U.S.
– Funds raised by St. Baldrick’s events held outside the U.S. are granted to achildhood cancer beneciary in the country o the event.
Consortium Research Grant
– Granted to a group o researchers at multiple institutions. This new undingcategory was created to und more researchers who are banding together to work on exciting projects with greatpromise. The grant is made to one institution, which manages the unds to be used by all consortium members.
Cooperative Research Grant (COG)
- A multi-million dollar grant to the Children’s Oncology Group, a cooperativeresearch group with approximately 200 member institutions across the U.S. and beyond. Each institution receivesa portion o this grant, distributed based on the number o patients at each institution who are treated on COGclinical trials, their best hope or a cure. In this way, the St. Baldrick’s Foundation unds virtually every institutionqualied to treat childhood cancers.
Inrastructure Grant
– Funding to help institutions treat more children on clinical trials, which may be their besthope or a cure, or or resources to make more research possible.
Research Grant
– Funding or research to nd new and better cures or childhood cancer. Some ocus on a singledisease type, and others will help children and teens with broader categories or even all types o childhoodcancers.
St. Baldrick’s Fellow
– A new doctor training to specialize in pediatric oncology research. St. Baldrick’s Fellows areunded or two years, with an optional third year or those needing more time to complete a promising researchproject.
St. Baldrick’s Scholar
– A young proessional pursuing exciting research, unded or 3 years or more. Becausegrant unds are scarce, it is dicult or those early in their careers to compete with more established researchers.These grants keep new researchers ocused on childhood cancer.
St. Baldrick’s Summer Fellow
– Funding or students to work in a pediatric oncology research lab or the summerater their rst year o medical school. Students conduct a research project and the experience may encouragethem to choose childhood cancer research as a specialty.

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