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ArnoldOn: Wellness

ArnoldOn: Wellness

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Published by Arnold Worldwide
If you have read a newspaper, turned on the television, or visited a gym or grocery store in the past year, chances are you have heard the word “wellness” more times than you can count. Yesterday’s wellness referred to the management of chronic diseases and the absence of sickness. Today, wellness increasingly refers to a broader and more
ambiguous state of physical and mental well-being – a presence of positivity if you will.
For some, wellness evokes the need to eat better, exercise or refrain from harmful habits
such as smoking. For others, wellness is associated with “alternative” pursuits such as
meditation, yoga or massage. The wellness section of any large bookstore today includes
books on such disparate subjects as meditation, new age spirituality, career transitions, losing weight, social relationships and wealth accrual. With wellness encompassing so much today, we might well wonder if the term still holds any real meaning at all.

For this issue of Arnold On, we conducted a global study to understand how consumers
think about wellness today. We have also taken a closer look at emerging manifestations of wellness in the U.S. Based on our research, we have identified several universal themes around how consumers perceive wellness, a set of requirements for making wellness work and a number of ways in which marketers can tap into wellness.
If you have read a newspaper, turned on the television, or visited a gym or grocery store in the past year, chances are you have heard the word “wellness” more times than you can count. Yesterday’s wellness referred to the management of chronic diseases and the absence of sickness. Today, wellness increasingly refers to a broader and more
ambiguous state of physical and mental well-being – a presence of positivity if you will.
For some, wellness evokes the need to eat better, exercise or refrain from harmful habits
such as smoking. For others, wellness is associated with “alternative” pursuits such as
meditation, yoga or massage. The wellness section of any large bookstore today includes
books on such disparate subjects as meditation, new age spirituality, career transitions, losing weight, social relationships and wealth accrual. With wellness encompassing so much today, we might well wonder if the term still holds any real meaning at all.

For this issue of Arnold On, we conducted a global study to understand how consumers
think about wellness today. We have also taken a closer look at emerging manifestations of wellness in the U.S. Based on our research, we have identified several universal themes around how consumers perceive wellness, a set of requirements for making wellness work and a number of ways in which marketers can tap into wellness.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Arnold Worldwide on Apr 30, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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04/30/2013

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WELLNESS
 
 ARNOLD ON 
EXPLORES CULTURAL, SOCIAL
AND CONSUMER TRENDS THAT ARE
DIRECTLY IMPACTING BUSINESSES TODAY.
THROUGH A COMBINATION OF CULTURAL
OBSERVATION AND PROPRIETARY QUALITATIVE
AND QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH, WE AIM TOUNCOVER MEANINGFUL SHIFTS IN CONSUMERATTITUDES AND BEHAVIORS AND PROVIDEMARKETERS WITH WAYS TO HARNESSTHESE TRENDS TO BENEFIT THEIRBRANDS AND BUSINESSES.
 
If you have read a newspaper, turned on the television, or visited a gym or grocery store in the past year, chances are you have heard the word “wellness” more times than you can count. Yesterday’s wellness referred to the management of chronic diseases andthe absence of sickness. Today, wellness increasingly refers to a broader and moreambiguous state of physical and mental well-being – a presence of positivity if you will.For some, wellness evokes the need to eat better, exercise or refrain from harmful habitssuch as smoking. For others, wellness is associated with “alternative” pursuits such asmeditation, yoga or massage. The wellness section of any large bookstore today includesbooks on such disparate subjects as meditation, new age spirituality, career transitions,losing weight, social relationships and wealth accrual. With wellness encompassing somuch today, we might well wonder if the term still holds any real meaning at all.For this issue of 
 Arnold On
, we conducted a global study to understand how consumersthink about wellness today. We have also taken a closer look at emerging manifestationsof wellness in the U.S. Based on our research, we have identied several universal themesaround how consumers perceive wellness, a set of requirements for making wellness work and a number of ways in which marketers can tap into wellness.

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