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Report of Faculty Senate Assessment Task Force, Final (1)

Report of Faculty Senate Assessment Task Force, Final (1)

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Published by: samtlevin on Apr 30, 2013
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08/08/2013

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Report of the Faculty Senate Assessment Task Force
April 24, 2013
 
2
Table of Contents
Task Force Mission ……………………………………………… 1Methods ………………………………………………………….. 1Preamble ………………………………………………………….. 2Executive Summary ……………………………………………… 3Detailed Report …………………………………………………... 6Appendices ….…………………………………………………... 27
 
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Report of Faculty Senate Assessment Task Force
Task Force Mission:
To “identify and provide supporting evidence concerning:(1) Experiences of the various academic units of the university stemming from policies,actions, or inactions implemented by the President or the [former] Vice President for Academic Affairs;(2) Issues related to management of the University’s fiscal resources; and(3) Additional experiences of the faculty and examples of management of the University.”
Methods.
The purpose of this report is to fulfill the mission given to the task force by theFaculty Senate. The methods used to collect evidence reflect this purpose. The scope of thereport is limited to topics and issues that fall within the task force’s charge. It does not include ageneral assessment of the University.The report is based on interviews with Assessment Task Force members in every school andcollege, with faculty and staff in several schools and in Madrid, and with current and former executive staff. In addition, we reviewed news reports and earlier reports and surveys from theFaculty Evidence Committee. We requested legal, financial, and accreditation documents fromthe Administration, but the Administration did not respond to our request. Most of our findingsrelate to recent events, although some people interviewed recalled incidents that go back to 2007.Because our report describes an institutional culture, it draws on both qualitative and quantitativesources of evidence, as is common in analyzing culture. Surveys allow researchers to take anempirical snapshot of a larger population. In this report, the survey data we report come from asample of all SLU faculty to assess, for example, whether faculty think it is time for SLU tochoose a new president, and samples of Arts and Sciences faculty and all SLU staff and to assesswhether people fear retaliation against individuals or academic units for actions deemedoppositional by the President. These survey data support the claims that most faculty think it istime for a new president and that there is widespread fear of retaliation.Interviews, by contrast, provide specific examples of the kind of retaliation faculty fear or aremotivated to avoid—whether that is loss of employment, denial of a sabbatical leave request,denial of resources, or appointment of a dean or chair without faculty input. These examples of how faculty respond to intimidation reflect the fact that there is differential distribution of power and knowledge across the University. Depending upon the unit in which they work, their tenureor non-tenured status, the nature of their duties to the University and other factors, facultyexperience fear of retaliation in different ways. Interview data provide a more nuanced pictureof these experiences than survey data can. Moreover, they give voice to those who may nototherwise have it, which is particularly important for assessing the organizational culture of aJesuit university that emphasizes the dignity of individuals and the importance of educating thewhole person.Both interview and survey data are empirical; they provide complementary sets of evidence. They are statements of fact, the kind of fact upon which news reporters, historians,and qualitative social scientists rely to piece together the meaning of events.

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