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THREE
FIVE
SEVEN
EIGHT
NINE
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EIGHTEEN
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The Same Stuff as Stars

The Same Stuff as Stars

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4.12

(37)
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2013 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award

Angel Morgan needs help. Daddy is in jail, and Mama has abandoned her and her little brother, leaving them with their great-grandmother. Grandma is aged and poor, and doesn’t make any attempt to care for the children—that’s left up to Angel, even though she is not yet twelve. The only bright spot in Angel’s existence is the Star Man, a mysterious stranger who appears on clear nights and teaches her all about the stars and planets and constellations. “We’re made out of the same stuff as the stars,” he tells her.

Eventually, Grandma warms to the children and the three begin to cobble together a makeshift family. Then events in Angel’s life take yet another downturn, and she must once again find a way to persevere.

Katherine Paterson’s keen sensitivity and penetrating sense of drama bring us a moving story of throwaway children, reminding us of the incredible resilience of childhood and the unquenchable spirit that, in spite of loss, struggles to new beginnings.
2013 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award

Angel Morgan needs help. Daddy is in jail, and Mama has abandoned her and her little brother, leaving them with their great-grandmother. Grandma is aged and poor, and doesn’t make any attempt to care for the children—that’s left up to Angel, even though she is not yet twelve. The only bright spot in Angel’s existence is the Star Man, a mysterious stranger who appears on clear nights and teaches her all about the stars and planets and constellations. “We’re made out of the same stuff as the stars,” he tells her.

Eventually, Grandma warms to the children and the three begin to cobble together a makeshift family. Then events in Angel’s life take yet another downturn, and she must once again find a way to persevere.

Katherine Paterson’s keen sensitivity and penetrating sense of drama bring us a moving story of throwaway children, reminding us of the incredible resilience of childhood and the unquenchable spirit that, in spite of loss, struggles to new beginnings.

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Publish date: Sep 23, 2002
Added to Scribd: May 01, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780547533001
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03/27/2014

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9780547533001

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whisper1_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Katherine Paterson has the distinct honor of receiving two Newbery medals, one in 1981 for Jacob I Have Loved and another in 1978 for Bridge to Terabithia. In 1979 she received a Newbery honor for The Great Gilly Hopkins.This is a writer who creates unique characters. Paterson brings clarity of emotion and poignancy to each page. The Same Stuff as Stars deals with the heartbreaking topic of child neglect.Angel is twelve and spent most of her young life shouldering the burden in the role parents should perform. With a father in jail and a mother who slaps instead of hugs, who shouts instead of whispers, who cares only about herself instead of others, and who flits from man to man, Angel is left to care for her mother, herself and her little brother Bernie.Overwhelmed with even the most simple task, dysfunctional Mamma Verna decides it is time to unburden herself of two unwanted children. She abandons them with their great grandmother. Leaving them with a feeble and frail older woman, Verna speeds away from the trailer park faster than her broken down truck can spin its tires.Paterson gracefully shows the range of emotions Angel experiences. Blaming herself for her parent's abuse, Angel justifies the abandonment. Gradually Angel realizes that she should not be the adult and the cards dealt her are not a full deck.Odds stacked against her, Angel moves forward, finding a friend in the local librarian and an unlikely friend whom her grandmother refers to as Santa Clause."Santa Clause" shows her the beauty of the night sky and provides a steady reference of encouragement.The librarian opens a world of knowledge and love of books. Her Great Grandmother is spunky and does the best she can to provide for Angel and Bernie.Realistically portraying the strength and fortitude of Angel and her ability to survive despite all odds, I'm guessing this author has personal knowledge of abandonment and neglect.Highly recommended.Five Stars
mslangdon reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Part D FamilyPaterson, K. (2002). The same stuff as stars. New York: Clarion Books.A father in jail, a careless mother, and a seven-year-old brother is what Angel Morgan knows about family, until her mother abandons her and her brother with their 80-year-old great-grandmother who can barely care for herself. At only eleven, Angel is a mother figure to both her brother and her grandmother. She buys the groceries and makes sure they have proper nutrition, making sure to have the five major food groups. She enrolls them into school. In addition to all of her responsibilities, she worries that social services is going to figure out that their mom left them and will put her and her brother into foster care. She wonders when her mom will return and if her dad will ever get out of jail. But, in all of the chaos and worries, she finds stability, friends, and her family. Angel Morgan’s loneliness and worries don’t bring her down. Her optimistic attitude and strength add to the inspiring story of family and the struggles of life. Paterson’s depiction of Angel Morgan and her life experiences exemplifies the possible life of many young children in today’s world that may not have a strong family structure. Ages 9-12.
abbylibrarian_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Angel Morgan knows that she has to be careful. She has to look out for her younger brother because she can't count on her mom to do it. She has to make sure that they eat balanced meals and that Bernie always wears his seatbelt. Their mom is unpredictable and little things set her off, so Angel is not very surprised when her mom tells her that they're moving. They have an hour or so to pack one suitcase apiece and then they're off to Angel's great-grandma's house in the country. But when Angel's mom leaves them there and doesn't come back, Angel has to face the fact that she's all Bernie has. She has to learn to live with a crotchety great-grandma who's barely able to care for herself. And she realizes that she's stronger than she ever thought she was. The audiobook of this novel was really great. Narrator Alyssa Bresnahan does a great job with different voices and it was really interesting to listen to. It's a great story, a bit sad sometimes, but ultimately uplifting, with great characters that I came to love.
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